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I'm having trouble setting fixed widths on columns which use colspan.

It seems that neither IE8, Firefox or Chrome can figure out how to correctly size columns with colspan.

Try the following code to see the problem in action:

<h2>One table with colspans, incorrect cell dimensions</h2>
<table border="1">
<tr>
    <td style="width:20px;">20</td>
    <td style="width:50px;" colspan="2">50</td>
    <td>a</td>
    <td>a</td></tr>
<tr>
    <td style="width:50px;" colspan="2">50</td>
    <td style="width:20px;">20</td>
    <td>a</td>
    <td>a</td></tr>
</table>

<h2>Split tables, correct cell dimensions</h2>
<table border="1">
<tr>
    <td style="width:20px;">20</td>
    <td style="width:50px;">50</td>
    <td>a</td>
    <td>a</td></tr>
</table>
<table border="1">
<tr>
    <td style="width:50px;">50</td>
    <td style="width:20px;">20</td>
    <td>a</td>
    <td>a</td></tr>
</table>

Can anyone explain why this might be happening, and if there is a workaround.

Thanks.

EDIT:

have tried doctypes

<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN">
<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Strict//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-strict.dtd">
share|improve this question
1  
Most probably irrelevant, but just to be sure: What doctype are you using? –  thirtydot Mar 21 '11 at 4:47
    
I can't quite place my finger on it, but you're using colspan incorrectly. colspan is used to "merge" n cells in a row into one "single cell". You can't use it in the way you're trying to. See: reference.sitepoint.com/html/td/colspan –  thirtydot Mar 21 '11 at 4:59
    
i am merging n cells in a row into one single cell. it's just that i'm doing it differently in the next row also. it's really not a complex construct. the total width of the first 3 cells (ie 1x1+2x1 or 2x1+1x1) in both rows is 70. imagine there is a 3rd row with widths 20,30,20. in-fact if you create the 3rd row, it magically lines up correctly. –  pstanton Mar 21 '11 at 5:06

2 Answers 2

up vote 20 down vote accepted

Because your column widths are contradicting. In row 1 you have columns widths 20, 50/2; in row 2 you have column widths 50/2, 20.

Row 1, Column 1 is defined as 20.
Row 1, Column 2 is defined as 50.
Row 2, Column 1 is defined as 50.
Row 2, Column 2 is defined as 20.

You can't have overlapping colspans of different widths, the table cells need to line up. You're trying to draw this table:

|-----|----------|
|----------|-----|

Which is not valid since the columns don't line up. In order to do this you need to add more columns:

|-----|----.-----|
|-----.----|-----|

Where "." is a column that is hidden by the column span. Try this HTML:

<!DOCTYPE HTML>

<html>
    <head>
        <title>Test</title>
    </head>
    <body>
        <table border="1" style="table-layout: fixed;">
            <col style="width: 20px;"/>
            <col style="width: 30px;"/>
            <col style="width: 20px;"/>
            <tbody>
                <tr>
                    <td>20</td>
                    <td colspan="2">50</td>
                </tr>
                <tr>
                    <td colspan="2">50</td>
                    <td>20</td>
                </tr>
            </tbody>
        </table>
    </body>
</html>
share|improve this answer
    
i understand what you are trying to tell me, however i don't think i'm wrong to expect the browser(s) to figure out what i'm telling it to do. see my comment (comment 3 of question). they are not contradicting, since they both total 70. –  pstanton Mar 21 '11 at 5:08
    
I've updated my answer with a better explanation and example. –  Josh M. Mar 21 '11 at 5:24
    
ahh! thanks :) that is better. –  pstanton Mar 21 '11 at 5:32
    
You're welcome. –  Josh M. Mar 21 '11 at 5:41
    
Lovely hack :-) –  Kamran Ahmed Mar 9 at 13:28

It has to do with the way browsers calculate the widths for each column. Tables require more overhead because of their flexible nature and more than 1 pass depending on what dimensions you set and content.

To make a long story short, colspan on the first row when you want to set column widths on subsequent rows gums up the works. There are plenty of good ways to fix it, a bad way, however easy would be to have the very first row with 1 pixel of height setting the trend for the column widths.

share|improve this answer
3  
What would be a "good" way - can you provide an example? –  Bostone Jul 26 '13 at 2:51

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