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what is the output of this code:

    char* f();

    main()
    {
        int *p=null;
        p= (int*)malloc(20 *sizeof(int));
        p=  f();
        cout<<p;

    }

    char *f()
    {
        char n[20];
        strcpy(n,"w");
    }
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closed as not a real question by Björn Pollex, sharptooth, Nawaz, Rob Kennedy, Prasoon Saurav Mar 21 '11 at 8:29

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

7  
Why don't you just compile and run it? Then you will see. –  Björn Pollex Mar 21 '11 at 8:08
3  
This is the second similar question that you ask within a few minutes. I would recommend that you get a C++ book (or at the very least a tutorial) read it, go over the examples, compile them... if you don't have a compiler available, install one, or use one of the available online: ideone. These are not proper questions, and you will probably not learn much by asking people to compile (or fail to) your programs. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Mar 21 '11 at 8:24

3 Answers 3

First of all, the line

  p= (int*)malloc(20 sizeof(int));

probably won't compile. I guess you mean

  p= (int*)malloc(20*sizeof(int));

?

I would write

char *f()
{
    char n[20];
    strcpy(n,"w");
    //explicit return:
    return n;
}

BUT THIS STILL PRODUCES UNDEFINED BEHAVIOR!

So the output of your program is undefined. It might output "w" but it might also output anything else.

If you're really using C++ you should make use of C++ techniques: new instead of malloc and std::string instead of char*.

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The output is undefined. It'll depend on your compiler, your compiler optimization level and your platform - since you do not return anything from f(). Very likely, on your platform, strcpy will return a value in a register, and this value will carry over as the return value of f() - giving you the address of n as output (you're passing an int * to cout - it'll print as an address).

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Newer compilers will complain, as the types don't match:

int *p="hello";
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