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I've been playing around a bit with the Tornado web server and have come to a point where I want to stop the web server (for example during unit testing). The following simple example exists on the Tornado web page:

import tornado.ioloop
import tornado.web

class MainHandler(tornado.web.RequestHandler):
    def get(self):
        self.write("Hello, world")

application = tornado.web.Application([
    (r"/", MainHandler),
])

if __name__ == "__main__":
    application.listen(8888)
    tornado.ioloop.IOLoop.instance().start()

Once tornado.ioloop.IOLoop.instance().start() is called, it blocks the program (or current thread). Reading the source code for the IOLoop object gives this example in the documentation for the stop function:

To use asynchronous methods from otherwise-synchronous code (such as
unit tests), you can start and stop the event loop like this:
  ioloop = IOLoop()
  async_method(ioloop=ioloop, callback=ioloop.stop)
  ioloop.start()
ioloop.start() will return after async_method has run its callback,
whether that callback was invoked before or after ioloop.start.

However, I have no idea how to integrate this into my program. I actually have a class that encapsulates the web server (having it's own start and stop functions), but as soon as I call start, the program (or tests) will of course block anyway.

I've tried to start the web server in another process (using the multiprocessing package). This is the class that is wrapping the web server:

class Server:
    def __init__(self, port=8888):
        self.application = tornado.web.Application([ (r"/", Handler) ])

        def server_thread(application, port):
            http_server = tornado.httpserver.HTTPServer(application)
            http_server.listen(port)
            tornado.ioloop.IOLoop.instance().start()

        self.process = Process(target=server_thread,
                               args=(self.application, port,))

    def start(self):
        self.process.start()

    def stop(self):
        ioloop = tornado.ioloop.IOLoop.instance()
        ioloop.add_callback(ioloop.stop)

However, stop does not seem to entirely stop the web server since it is still running in the next test, even with this test setup:

def setup_method(self, _function):
    self.server = Server()
    self.server.start()
    time.sleep(0.5)  # Wait for web server to start

def teardown_method(self, _function):
    self.kstore.stop()
    time.sleep(0.5)

How can I start and stop a Tornado web server from within a Python program?

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6 Answers 6

up vote 14 down vote accepted

I just ran into this and found this issue myself, and using info from this thread came up with the following. I simply took my working stand alone Tornado code (copied from all the examples) and moved the actual starting code into a function. I then called the function as a threading thread. My case different as the threading call was done from my existing code where I just imported the startTornado and stopTornado routines.

The suggestion above seemed to work great, so I figured I would supply the missing example code. I tested this code under Linux on a FC16 system (and fixed my initial type-o).

import tornado.ioloop, tornado.web

class Handler(tornado.web.RequestHandler):
    def get(self):
        self.write("Hello, world")

application = tornado.web.Application([ (r"/", Handler) ])

def startTornado():
    application.listen(8888)
    tornado.ioloop.IOLoop.instance().start()

def stopTornado():
    tornado.ioloop.IOLoop.instance().stop()

if __name__ == "__main__":
    import time, threading
    threading.Thread(target=startTornado).start()
    print "Your web server will self destruct in 2 minutes"
    time.sleep(120)
    stopTornado()

Hope this helps the next person.

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11  
This is not thread safe. Will probably work until one Friday evening when you are about to go to a five weeks vacation. –  Schildmeijer Jul 6 '12 at 20:41
    
This doesn't work with multiprocessing. The problem with the ioloop.instance.stop() method is that it only works if you're running it inside the thread that had the previous ioloop.instance(). If you're using multiprocessing to wrap this, it just doesn't work. –  Nisan.H Aug 3 '12 at 19:26
    
@Schildmeijer, Can you elaborate why and how it can break? Thanks! –  Zaar Hai Jun 10 '13 at 11:13
1  
This is not thread safe indded as Schilmeijer notes. I've posted a thread save answer below. –  Zaar Hai Jun 26 '13 at 16:08
    
@ZaarHai Can you elaborate on the difference between the thread-safe answer you posted and this one? You seem to have learned the answer. –  Shule Sep 13 '14 at 2:44

Here is the solution how to stop Torando from another thread. Schildmeijer provided a good hint, but it took me a while to actually figure the final example that works.

Please see below:

import threading
import tornado.ioloop
import tornado.web
import time


class MainHandler(tornado.web.RequestHandler):
    def get(self):
        self.write("Hello, world!\n")

def start_tornado(*args, **kwargs):
    application = tornado.web.Application([
        (r"/", MainHandler),
    ])
    application.listen(8888)
    print "Starting Torando"
    tornado.ioloop.IOLoop.instance().start()
    print "Tornado finished"

def stop_tornado():
    ioloop = tornado.ioloop.IOLoop.instance()
    ioloop.add_callback(lambda x: x.stop(), ioloop)
    print "Asked Tornado to exit"

def main():

    t = threading.Thread(target=start_tornado)  
    t.start()

    time.sleep(5)

    stop_tornado()
    t.join()

if __name__ == "__main__":
    main()
share|improve this answer

To stop the entire ioloop you simply invoke the ioloop.stop method when you have finished the unit test. (Remember that the only (documented) thread safe method is ioloop.add_callback, ie. if the unit tests is executed by another thread, you could wrap the stop invocation in a callback)

If its enough to stop the http web server you invoke the httpserver.stop() method

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1  
But calling ioloop.start() blocks, so how could I call ioloop.stop()? Should I run ioloop.start() in another thread? –  Adam Lindberg Mar 21 '11 at 18:32
    
Thats one solution. (remember to wrap the ioloop.stop in an ioloop callback to avoid concurrent modification). Another solution is to stop the the ioloop from the ioloop itself. –  Schildmeijer Mar 23 '11 at 8:16
    
This seems to work when running from the shell. Thanks! –  Adam Lindberg Mar 28 '11 at 10:11
1  
I am sorry to bother you, but i've faced the same problem (I run tornado in a thread, but i can not stop it). I read your answer and comments and i really didn't understand how to do it. Can you please post few lines of code to illustrate your approach? Thanks. –  Alik Jul 26 '11 at 14:47
    
@Konstantin I think Robert Anderson's answer below details an approximation of the solution I went for. Let me know if it's not enough. –  Adam Lindberg Jan 10 '12 at 16:32

If you need this behavior for unit testing, take a look at tornado.testing.AsyncTestCase.

By default, a new IOLoop is constructed for each test and is available as self.io_loop. This IOLoop should be used in the construction of HTTP clients/servers, etc. If the code being tested requires a global IOLoop, subclasses should override get_new_ioloop to return it.

If you need to start and stop an IOLoop for some other purpose and can't call ioloop.stop() from a callback for some reason, a multi-threaded implementation is possible. To avoid race conditions, however, you need to synchronize access to the ioloop, which is actually impossible. Something like the following will result in deadlock:

Thread 1:

with lock:
    ioloop.start()

Thread 2:

with lock:
    ioloop.stop()

because thread 1 will never release the lock (start() is blocking) and thread 2 will wait till the lock is released to stop the ioloop.

The only way to do it is for thread 2 to call ioloop.add_callback(ioloop.stop), which will call stop() on thread 1 in the event loop's next iteration. Rest assured, ioloop.add_callback() is thread-safe.

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Tornado's IOloop.instance() has trouble stopping from an external signal when run under multiprocessing.Process.

The only solution I came up with that works consistently, is by using Process.terminate():

import tornado.ioloop, tornado.web
import time
import multiprocessing

class Handler(tornado.web.RequestHandler):
    def get(self):
        self.write("Hello, world")

application = tornado.web.Application([ (r"/", Handler) ])

class TornadoStop(Exception):
    pass
def stop():
    raise TornadoStop
class worker(multiprocessing.Process):
    def __init__(self):
        multiprocessing.Process.__init__(self)
        application.listen(8888)
        self.ioloop = tornado.ioloop.IOLoop.instance()

    def run(self):
        self.ioloop.start()

    def stop(self, timeout = 0):
        self.ioloop.stop()
        time.sleep(timeout)
        self.terminate()



if __name__ == "__main__":

    w = worker()
    print 'starting server'
    w.start()
    t = 2
    print 'waiting {} seconds before stopping'.format(t)
    for i in range(t):
        time.sleep(1)
        print i
    print 'stopping'
    w.stop(1)
    print 'stopped'
share|improve this answer

Just add this before the start():

IOLoop.instance().add_timeout(10,IOLoop.instance().stop)

It will register the stop function as a callback in the loop and lauch it 10 second after the start

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