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I am working on some reports that were created before I started in my current job. One of these reports is based on a view (SQL Server 2005).

This view is incredibly large and unwieldy, and for now, I won't post it because I think it's just too big. I'm not sure how it was produced - I'm guessing that it was produced in the designer because I can't see someone actually writing stuff like this. It's several pages long, and references 5 other views. Bottom line - it's complicated, and needs to be refactored/redesigned, but until we get time for that we're stuck with it.

Anyway, I have to make some minor non-functional changes to it in order to move it to a different database and schema. In order to make sure I'm not changing what it actually returns, I'm amending a second version of the view. Let's call the first view vw_Data1 and my new view vw_Data2. Now, if I write:

SELECT Count(*) FROM
(
SELECT * FROM vw_Data1
UNION
SELECT * FROM vw_Data2
)

then I should get back the same number as if I just did

SELECT Count(*) FROM vw_Data1

as long as vw_Data1 and vw_Data2 return identical rows (which is what I want to check).

However, what I am finding is if I run the UNION query above several times, I get DIFFERENT RESULTS EACH TIME.

So, just to be clear, if I run:

SELECT Count(*) FROM
(
SELECT * FROM vw_Data1
UNION
SELECT * FROM vw_Data2
)

more than once, then I get different results each time.

As I say, I'm not posting the actual code yet, because the first thing I want to ask is simply this - how on earth can a query return different results?

There is one non-deterministic function used, and that is as part of the following (horrible) join:

LEFT OUTER JOIN dbo.vwuniversalreportingdata_budget 
     ON 



CASE
    WHEN dbo.f_tasks.ta_category = 'Reactive' THEN
        CAST(dbo.f_tasks.ta_fkey_fc_seq AS VARCHAR(10)) 
            + ' | ' 
                + CAST(dbo.f_tasks.ta_fkey_fcc_seq AS VARCHAR(10)) 
                    + ' | ' 
                        + CAST(YEAR(DATEADD(MONTH, -3, dbo.f_tasks.ta_sched_date)) AS VARCHAR(10))
    WHEN dbo.f_tasks.ta_category = 'Planned' THEN
        CAST(dbo.f_tasks.ta_fkey_fc_seq AS VARCHAR(10)) 
            + ' | ' 
                + CAST(dbo.f_tasks.ta_fkey_fcc_seq AS VARCHAR(10)) 
                    + ' | ' 
                        + CAST(YEAR(DATEADD(MONTH, -3, dbo.f_tasks.ta_est_date)) AS VARCHAR(10))
    WHEN dbo.f_tasks.ta_category = 'Periodic' THEN
        CAST(dbo.f_tasks.ta_fkey_fc_seq AS VARCHAR(10)) 
            + ' | ' 
                + CAST(dbo.f_tasks.ta_fkey_fcc_seq AS VARCHAR(10)) 
                    + ' | ' 
                        + CAST(YEAR(DATEADD(MONTH, -3, dbo.f_tasks.ta_est_date)) AS VARCHAR(10))
END
= dbo.vwuniversalreportingdata_budget.id 

The whole query is pretty disgusting like this. Anyway, any thoughts on how this could happen would be gratefully received. Is it something to do with the union, perhaps? I don't know. Help!

share|improve this question
1  
Two obvious reasons you probably already investigated. The current datetime is different and affects the results. The source data has been updated between runs. –  Mikael Eriksson Mar 21 '11 at 10:00
1  
If it's reproducable like you say, remove the select count(*) and diff the different outputs. –  Lieven Keersmaekers Mar 21 '11 at 11:05
    
Agree with Lieven. Full join the two and output only WHERE vw_Data1.ID IS NOT NULL OR vw_Data2.ID IS NOT NULL. –  Andriy M Mar 21 '11 at 13:14
    
Hi guys. Ok, so the datetime thing occurred to me - more on that below. Re: the source data changing, that's definitely not happening cos I'm working on a development server that no one else is accessing. Lieven, unfortunately, the views don't have unique ids, so I can't do the check like you say - however, I've done something slightly different - see below. –  brundlefly Mar 22 '11 at 13:56
    
I've since had the same problem again. This time I've whittled it down to something more manageable. So, the following query SHOULD NOT RETURN ANYTHING: SELECT SUM(paid_amt) FROM f_payments INNER JOIN f_po_head poh ON paid_fkey_poh_seq = poh_seq INNER JOIN fsupply sup ON poh_fkey_sup_seq = sup_seq GROUP BY paid_invoice_numbr EXCEPT SELECT SUM(paid_amt) FROM f_payments pay INNER JOIN f_po_head poh ON paid_fkey_poh_seq = poh_seq INNER JOIN fsupply sup ON poh_fkey_sup_seq = sup_seq GROUP BY paid_invoice_numbr –  brundlefly Mar 22 '11 at 13:58

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