Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm hoping to write a program to help me optimize on a 2d grid. In this grid, there are "blocks" which have a range that determines its area of effect. Many blocks can be placed on the grid. Each block may take up more than 1 tile, but is always square. I want to find out the maximum amount of times the area of effect can overlap a single XY position.

I need to figure this out for 36 combinations (4 block types - 1x1, 2x2, 3x3, and 4x4, and ranges 1-9)

The area of effect is always in a square pattern. In the example below, the letters are the blocks, and the numbers are where the area of effect is. A is a 1x1 block that has an area of effect of 1. B is a 1x1 block with an area of effect of 2. And C is a 2x2 block with an area of effect of 1.

X X X X X
X 1 1 1 X
X 1 A 1 X
X 1 1 1 X
X X X X X

X X X X X X X
X 2 2 2 2 2 X
X 2 2 2 2 2 X
X 2 2 B 2 2 X
X 2 2 2 2 2 X
X 2 2 2 2 2 X
X X X X X X X

X X X X X X
X 1 1 1 1 X
X 1 C C 1 X
X 1 C C 1 X
X 1 1 1 1 X
X X X X X X

I can put as many blocks on the grid as I want, and I want to find out how many times the area of effect overlaps a target tile. For example, if I have an A tile (1x1 with 1 range), I maximize the area of effect by surround the target T. So the answer here would be 8.

X X X X X
X A A A X
X A T A X
X A A A X
X X X X X

Anyone know how I can figure this out for the other combinations? Thanks!

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

What you need is some form of spatial partitioning so that it is easy to find the blocks that affect a particular position. Googling 'tree algorithms' should give you an idea on the various ways to partition the space, but the general idea is:

for each block
  addblock (root, block)

addblock (node, block)
  if block fits inside node
    if there are child nodes
      for each child
        addblock (child, block)
    else
      add block to node by dividing into area occupied by block and areas not occupied by block, moving any blocks at this node into all new child nodes
  else
    if there are child nodes
      for each child
        addblock (child, block)
    else
      add block to node block list

Then, to find the number of blocks covering a square, search the tree for the node covering the given square and then see how many blocks are in that node.

share|improve this answer

What you want is a space-filling-curve like a Z-Curve or a Hilbert-Curve and then instead to compute the index convert it to a quadtree-key for each tile. A sfc reduce the 2D-problem to a 1D problem. Then with the new key you want to perform a DFS or BFS to look for overlapping tiles. I've wrote a class for sfc in php at phpclasses.org ( hilbert-curve ). You are welcome to download.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.