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I have written a debugging macro and wished to include the time in it, in this case my function gettimestr() accepts a small buffer (always 8 in length, because its sprintf pads to 00:00:00) and include that with the fprintf within. My macro looks like the following:

#define _DEBUGPRINT(...)    fprintf(stderr, __VA_ARGS__);
#ifndef NDEBUG
#  define WHERESTR  "[[%s] file %s, line %d]: "
#  define WHEREARG  timebufstr_0, __FILE__, __LINE__
#  define DEBUGPRINT(_fmt, ...) \
          char timebufstr_0[8]; \
          gettimestr( timebufstr_0 );\
          _DEBUGPRINT(WHERESTR _fmt, WHEREARG, __VA_ARGS__)
#else
#  define DEBUGPRINT(_fmt, ...)  /**/
#endif

My first attempt was to have gettimestr return a const char*, but that is hard to free memory of so I went ahead and used a buffer if you can see.

Unfortunately the buffer cannot be used twice (two DEBUGPRINTs will give a redeclaration error) and also I believe it won't free the memory because it will disappear when main returns, as it is not in a function?

My questions are:

  • Should I malloc() 8 bytes (or 9 if for \0, I am unaware if that is required now) instead of [8] so I can free it on demand in the heap?
  • How should I be able to create the buffer, destroy references, and reuse it in another macro call to fix my problem where I could not call it twice?
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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted
#define _DEBUGPRINT(...)    fprintf(stderr, __VA_ARGS__);
#ifndef NDEBUG
#  define WHERESTR  "[[%s] file %s, line %d]: "
#  define WHEREARG  timebufstr_0, __FILE__, __LINE__
#  define DEBUGPRINT(_fmt, ...) \
   do { \
      char timebufstr_0[8]; \
      gettimestr( timebufstr_0 );\
      _DEBUGPRINT(WHERESTR _fmt, WHEREARG, __VA_ARGS__) \
   } while (0);
#else
#  define DEBUGPRINT(_fmt, ...)  /**/
#endif

Will allow multiple uses and deallocate the buffer after each use.

share|improve this answer
    
Well, to be accurate, the buffer probably won't be deallocated, but it will probably be reused by the next call with any halfway reasonable compiler. The buffer space will be reclaimed when the function exits. –  Richard Pennington Mar 21 '11 at 11:49
    
This works excellently, and now I've written my first useful complex macro! –  Tim N. Mar 21 '11 at 12:36
    
One note, you forgot to put a closing bracket before the while } while (0); –  Tim N. Mar 21 '11 at 12:36
1  
The do { ... } while(0) should not have a trailing ;, since it should be possible to use it as if (foo) DEBUGPRINT(...); else .... –  Lindydancer Mar 21 '11 at 14:43
1  
@Lindydancer: You're right. I usually leave off the trailing ;. In his example it looked as if he expected the semicolon as part of the macro. –  Richard Pennington Mar 21 '11 at 14:50

You should allocate 9 bytes for including the '\0' byte. The best way is to make it via a an array as posted in your code. For overcomming the problems of double-definition, you can enclose it in {}, e.g.:

#define _DEBUGPRINT(...)    fprintf(stderr, __VA_ARGS__);
#ifndef NDEBUG
#  define WHERESTR  "[[%s] file %s, line %d]: "
#  define WHEREARG  timebufstr_0, __FILE__, __LINE__
#  define DEBUGPRINT(_fmt, ...) \
          {\ // <---------
          char timebufstr_0[9]; \
          gettimestr( timebufstr_0 );\
          _DEBUGPRINT(WHERESTR _fmt, WHEREARG, __VA_ARGS__)\
          } // <---------
#else
#  define DEBUGPRINT(_fmt, ...)  /**/
#endif
share|improve this answer
1  
You really need do { ... } while (0) for this kind of macro, otherwise it will break when used between an if and an else. –  Paul R Mar 21 '11 at 11:55
    
Thank you for warning me about the null byte and a bit more about the idea! –  Tim N. Mar 21 '11 at 12:35

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