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im unit testing my home controller. This test worked fine until I added a new feature which saves images.

The method that’s causing the issue is this below.

    public static void SaveStarCarCAPImage(int capID)
    {
        byte[] capBinary = Motorpoint2011Data.RetrieveCapImageData(capID);

        if (capBinary != null)
        {
            MemoryStream ioStream = new MemoryStream();
            ioStream = new MemoryStream(capBinary);

            // save the memory stream as an image
            // Read in the data but do not close, before using the stream.

            using (Stream originalBinaryDataStream = ioStream)
            {
                var path = HttpContext.Current.Server.MapPath("/StarVehiclesImages");
                path = System.IO.Path.Combine(path, capID + ".jpg");
                Image image = Image.FromStream(originalBinaryDataStream);
                Image resize = image.GetThumbnailImage(500, 375, null, new IntPtr());
                resize.Save(path, System.Drawing.Imaging.ImageFormat.Jpeg);
            }
        }
    }

As the call is coming from a unit test, HttpContext.Current is null and throws an exception. After reading about Moq and some of the tutorials about using Moq with sessions, im sure it can be done.

so far this the unit test code have come up with, but the issue is HTTPContext.Current is always null, and still throws the exception.

    protected ControllerContext CreateStubControllerContext(Controller controller)
    {
        var httpContextStub = new Mock<HttpContextBase>
        {
            DefaultValue = DefaultValue.Mock
        };

        return new ControllerContext(httpContextStub.Object, new RouteData(), controller);
    }

    [TestMethod]
    public void Index()
    {
        // Arrange
        HomeController controller = new HomeController();            
        controller.SetFakeControllerContext();

        var context = controller.HttpContext;

        Mock.Get(context).Setup(s => s.Server.MapPath("/StarVehiclesImages")).Returns("My Path");

        // Act
        ViewResult result = controller.Index() as ViewResult;

        // Assert
        HomePageModel model = (HomePageModel)result.Model;
        Assert.AreEqual("Welcome to ASP.NET MVC!", model.Message);
        Assert.AreEqual(typeof(List<Vehicle>), model.VehicleMakes.GetType());
        Assert.IsTrue(model.VehicleMakes.Exists(x => x.Make.Trim().Equals("Ford", StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase)));
    }
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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

HttpContext.Current is something that you should absolutely never use if you ever expect your code to be unit tested. It is a static method which simply returns null if there is no web context which is the case of a unit test and cannot be mocked. So one way to refactor your code would be the following:

public static void SaveStarCarCAPImage(int capID, string path)
{
    byte[] capBinary = Motorpoint2011Data.RetrieveCapImageData(capID, path);

    if (capBinary != null)
    {
        MemoryStream ioStream = new MemoryStream();
        ioStream = new MemoryStream(capBinary);

        // save the memory stream as an image
        // Read in the data but do not close, before using the stream.

        using (Stream originalBinaryDataStream = ioStream)
        {
            path = System.IO.Path.Combine(path, capID + ".jpg");
            Image image = Image.FromStream(originalBinaryDataStream);
            Image resize = image.GetThumbnailImage(500, 375, null, new IntPtr());
            resize.Save(path, System.Drawing.Imaging.ImageFormat.Jpeg);
        }
    }
}

You see, now this method no longer depends on any web context and can be tested in isolation. It will be the responsibility of the caller to pass the correct path.

share|improve this answer
    
good suggestion, but Moq appears to have the option of mocking the with "Mock.Get(context).Setup()" does this not work or is it best practise to avoid HttpContext in testing methods all together? –  JGilmartin Mar 21 '11 at 15:30
1  
@Truegilly, avoid HttpContext.Current. It's just good practice. –  Darin Dimitrov Mar 21 '11 at 15:47
    
ok ill do that from now on :) –  JGilmartin Mar 21 '11 at 15:49

I actually agree with the Darin´s answer but if you really need to moq the Server.MapPath funcion you could do something like this

//...
var serverMock = new Mock<HttpServerUtilityBase>(MockBehavior.Loose);
serverMock.Setup(i => i.MapPath(It.IsAny<String>()))
   .Returns((String a) => a.Replace("~/", @"C:\testserverdir\").Replace("/",@"\"));
//...

Preforming this, the mock will simply replace the ~/ with the c:\testserverdir\ function

Hope it helps!

share|improve this answer
    
Am I missing something? I am still not able to mock that part of HttpContext because context.Server has no setter. So I see no way to actually use your HttpServerUtilityBase mock with HttpContext –  buddybubble Aug 8 '13 at 9:36

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