Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Maybe this is a dumb question, but I can't find the answer: in the following xaml what does CommandParameter binding to? Or in general, what does "{Binding}" mean?

<Button Command="{Binding DataContext.DeleteCommand, ElementName=List}" 
        CommandParameter="{Binding}"/>
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 28 down vote accepted

{Binding ...} is a MarkupExtension.
In its usual form it takes a Path like {Binding Path=someProperty, ...} (or its short form {Binding someProperty, ...}).
So the path in {Binding} is empty which means the Binding is bound to whatever Source there is for the Binding. This might be a little easier to understand if you know, that {Binding} is actually the same as {Binding DataContext,RelativeSource={RelativeSource Self}}.

So in your case CommandParameter gets the value of the current DataContext of the Button.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, it's clear to me now. –  Bolu Mar 21 '11 at 13:46
    
@Robaticus I left out the closing bracket intentionally, to emphasize there are possibly more parameters... but either way I think one gets the point –  Markus Hütter Mar 21 '11 at 13:48
1  
sorry about that. It's one of those obsessions: when I see an open bracket, I feel compelled to close it. –  Robaticus Mar 21 '11 at 15:03

An Empty {Binding} will pass the current DataContext of the control to the Executed and CanExecute methods respectively.

Check the below links

http://www.developmentalmadness.com/archive/2009/08/26/xaml-binding-to-the-current-datacontext.aspx

http://www.wpfmentor.com/2009/01/how-to-add-binding-to-commandparameter.html

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, your links are very helpful. –  Bolu Mar 21 '11 at 13:46

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.