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I am trying to validate some information, so I added a validator and used @Valid in the parameter of the post method:

@Controller
@RequestMapping("/user.htm")
public class UserController {

    @Autowired
    private IUserService userService;

    @RequestMapping(method = RequestMethod.GET)
    public String userInfo(Model model) {
       ....
        return "user";
    }

    @RequestMapping(method = RequestMethod.POST)
    public String userInfoResult(@Valid @ModelAttribute UserForm userForm, BindingResult result, Model model ) {

        UserInfo stat = userService.getStatitisque(userForm.getSearchCritera());
        userForm.setListeExpediteur(listeExpediteur);

        userForm.setUserInfo(stat);
        model.addAttribute("userForm", userForm);
    }    
}

public class UserFormValidator implements Validator {

    @Override
    public boolean supports(Class<?> type) {
        return UserForm.class.equals(type);
    }

    @Override
    public void validate(Object o, Errors errors) {
        UserForm userForm = (User) o;
        ...
    }
}

When I debug, I never go in the UserFormValidator class.

Do I need to add something in these files?

  • web.xml
  • applicationContext.xml
  • dispatcher-servlet.xml
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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You need to add the validator in an @InitBinder method:

@InitBinder
protected void initBinder(WebDataBinder binder) {
    binder.setValidator(new FooValidator());
}

or globally via XML:

<mvc:annotation-driven validator="globalValidator"/>

Reference:

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I find it so odd that Spring requires you to manually add each of your validator classes to each of your controllers when it does pretty much everything else automatically. Is there any reason for this particular choice of API? –  LordOfThePigs Sep 1 '14 at 21:06

5.7.4.3 Configuring a JSR-303 Validator for use by Spring MVC

With JSR-303, a single javax.validation.Validator instance typically validates all model objects that declare validation constraints. To configure a JSR-303-backed Validator with Spring MVC, simply add a JSR-303 Provider, such as Hibernate Validator, to your classpath. Spring MVC will detect it and automatically enable JSR-303 support across all Controllers.

<mvc:annotation-driven/>

With this minimal configuration, anytime a @Valid @Controller input is encountered, it will be validated by the JSR-303 provider. JSR-303, in turn, will enforce any constraints declared against the input. Any ConstraintViolations will automatically be exposed as errors in the BindingResult renderable by standard Spring MVC form tags.

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@Controller
@RequestMapping("/user.htm")
public class UserController {
@Autowired
private IUserService userService;

@RequestMapping(method = RequestMethod.GET)
public String userInfo(Model model) {
   ....
    return "user";
}

@RequestMapping(method = RequestMethod.POST)
public String userInfoResult(Model model,
                             @Valid @ModelAttribute UserForm userForm,
                             BindingResult result) {
    /*
       add custom validation check to standard validation error
       (if not registry UserFormValidator in @InitBinder block)
    */
    new UserFormValidator().validate(userForm, error); 

    // check all validation errors   
    if (errors.hasErrors()) {
        // go back
        return userInfo(model);
    }

    ...
  } 
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is the third day but @InitBinder one is preferable among all possible ways to configure a custom Validator –  Amit Patel Jan 20 '12 at 11:15

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