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I'm trying to find a regular expression that matches a word in a string (the exact word). The problem is when this word has special characters like '#' or anything else. The special characters could be any UTF-8 char, like ("áéíóúñ#@"), and it have to ignore punctuations marks.

I put some examples of what i'm looking for:

Searching:#myword

 Sentence: "I like the elephants when they say #myword" <- MATCH
 Sentence: "I like the elephants when they say #mywords" <- NO MATCH
 Sentence: "I like the elephants when they say myword" <-NO MATCH
 Sentence: "I don't like #mywords. its silly" <- NO MATCH
 Sentence: "I like #myword!! It's awesome" <- MATCH
 Sentence: "I like #myword It's awesome" <- MATCH

PHP Example code:

 $regexp= "#myword";
    if (preg_match("/(\w$regexp)/", "I like #myword!! It's awesome")) {
        echo "YES YES YES";
    } else {
        echo "NO NO NO ";
    }

Thank you!

Update: If I look for "myword" the word has to begin by "w" and not another char.

Sentence: "I like myword!! It's awesome" <- MATCH
Sentence: "I like #myword It's awesome" <-NO MATCH
share|improve this question
5  
How does the 2nd and 4th produces a match and non match? –  alex Mar 21 '11 at 13:47
    
the 2nd it's followed by an alphabetical character and 4th isn't –  LDK Mar 21 '11 at 13:51
    
try escaping special characters with \ –  Yaronius Mar 21 '11 at 13:57
    
Should both 'myword' and 'mywords' be matched? Your examples don't quite make sense. –  Mauritz Hansen Mar 21 '11 at 14:01
1  
Provide a piece of your code, and everything will become clear –  Yaronius Mar 21 '11 at 14:07
show 4 more comments

3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The solution below is produced when thinking about characters and boundaries separately. There could also be a viable approach to use word boundaries directly.

Code:

function search($strings,$search) {
        $regexp = "/(?:[[:space:]]|^)".$search."(?:[^\w]|$)/i";
        foreach ($strings as $string) {
                echo "Sentence: \"$string\" <- " . 
                     (preg_match($regexp,$string) ? "MATCH" : "NO MATCH") ."\n";
        }
}

$strings = array(
"I like the elephants when they say #myword",
"I like the elephants when they say #mywords",
"I like the elephants when they say myword",
"I don't like #mywords. its silly",
"I like #myword!! It's awesome",
"I like #mywOrd It's awesome",
);
echo "Example 1:\n";
search($strings,"#myword");

$strings = array(
"I like myword!! It's awesome",
"I like #myword It's awesome",
);
echo "Example 2:\n";
search($strings,"myword");

Output:

Example 1:
Sentence: "I like the elephants when they say #myword" <- MATCH
Sentence: "I like the elephants when they say #mywords" <- NO MATCH
Sentence: "I like the elephants when they say myword" <- NO MATCH
Sentence: "I don't like #mywords. its silly" <- NO MATCH
Sentence: "I like #myword!! It's awesome" <- MATCH
Sentence: "I like #mywOrd It's awesome" <- MATCH
Example 2:
Sentence: "I like myword!! It's awesome" <- MATCH
Sentence: "I like #myword It's awesome" <- NO MATCH
share|improve this answer
    
Wow! Thank you Peter :) –  LDK Mar 21 '11 at 14:31
    
NP, I was utterly confused at first, but when you cleaned up the question and examples it could be solved. :) –  Peter Lindqvist Mar 21 '11 at 14:31
    
It's nice : ) How can I add case insensitive? –  LDK Mar 21 '11 at 15:00
    
just add 'i' at the end of the regexp. –  Peter Lindqvist Mar 21 '11 at 15:27
    
If i look for "myword" without the hashtag it matches for "#myword" too and it mustn't, please check the new examples on the update –  LDK Mar 21 '11 at 15:33
show 1 more comment

You should search myword with wordboundary like this /\bmyword\b/.
# itself is also a wordboundary so /\b#myword\b/ dosen't work.
one idea was to escape unicode character with \X but this will create other problems.

/ #myword\b/
share|improve this answer
    
this expression matches with 3rd example and it mustn't –  LDK Mar 21 '11 at 14:28
    
@LDK true \X is not a good idea to escape the unicode charater –  bw_üezi Mar 21 '11 at 14:59
    
+1 It works! I missed the leading space when i tried it. –  Peter Lindqvist Mar 21 '11 at 15:56
add comment

This should do the trick (replace "myword" with whatever you want to find):

^.*#myword[^\w].*$

If the match is a success then your word was found - otherwise it wasn't.

share|improve this answer
    
This expression it's wrong :( preg_match(): Unknown modifier '\' –  LDK Mar 21 '11 at 14:14
    
Okay? Works fine for me (Expresso - .Net). So you can replace "\w" with the characters: [a-z][A-Z][0-9] –  Josh M. Mar 21 '11 at 14:17
    
Or maybe you just need to escape the slash ("\\" instead of "\" I don't know in PHP). –  Josh M. Mar 21 '11 at 14:18
    
It does not produce the desired result, but otherwise it should work when adding delimiters. –  Peter Lindqvist Mar 21 '11 at 14:30
    
Yeah, it works fine. It's expected that you may have to tailor it to your (LDK's) specific implementation. Like I said I don't know PHP. –  Josh M. Mar 21 '11 at 14:37
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