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Hypothetical question - in order to understand licensing better. Not asking for legal advice. Please answer any parts of the question that you are comfortable with.

Suppose I want to build a program that is "proprietary" i.e., I do not wish to share the code with anyone and I do not wish people to distribute my program for free to any one else (just like Microsoft etc)

Lets say L is a library under GPL.

  1. Can I use tools like GCC to build my program?
  2. Can I use something like GIT as a version control for my code?
  3. I invoke a function in L but do not distribute L with my source code. I ask users to get their own software/library that has a similar function call. a) Is that allowed? b) Can I suggest that they use L?

Now let's suppose that tools A and B are under LGPL. And let there be a library L under LGPL.

  1. Can I use A to build my program?
  2. Can I use B as a version control for my code?
  3. I wish to invoke a function in L (without making any changes to it). a) Do I have to mention that I use L? b) Do I have to distribute L? c) Can I ask users to get their own software/library that has a similar function call. d) Can I suggest that they use L?

Understanding of GPL and source code "distribution".

Lets say that I sell a program under GPL. I know that I have to make sure that the source code is easily accessible. But lets say that distributing the source code on the same physical media is NOT possible.

  1. I can offer to distribute the source code for FREE but I can charge for distribution costs. Is my understanding correct reg. this?
  2. I think GPL 3 has a clause that I can make my source code available on a server. Does this apply to programs which have physical distributions or only to those made by a network?
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Using a GPL Library (by linking to its interface) makes your work GPL as far as I know. Ask the Developer if unsure. –  Stephan B Mar 21 '11 at 14:08
    
@Stephan.. I am a developer.. :D Was going through various licenses in order to get a better understanding so that I can answer management and clients. –  Neo Mar 21 '11 at 15:31
    
"Not asking for legal advice." You're asking for people to interpret a contract. How is that not legal advice? –  Wooble Mar 21 '11 at 17:50
    
Questions like this are usually answered with "IANAL" first. So I just wanted to tell everyone that I will not hold them accountable in case they have a different interpretation than what a court might interpret. And if you wish to get all techie about it, lwn.net/Articles/61292. FYI. :) –  Neo Mar 21 '11 at 19:30

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Lets say L is a library under GPL.

  • 1: yes
  • 2: yes
  • 3 a-c: There are conflicting interpretations here (so it's also very unclear how this would play out in court), but the FSF's view is that you're not allowed to link against L, period. That's what the LGPL is for.

Now let's suppose that tools A and B are under LGPL. And let there be a library L under LGPL.

1-3: yes, that's fine, that's what the LGPL is for.

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Thanks Michael. But for the LGPL part, you just yes for the 3rd question. So I am assuming you mean it is much more liberal than GPL and that I can link to it from proprietary code and NOT distribute it (the library L and its source). –  Neo Mar 21 '11 at 15:36
    
@CRK: It's yes for 1-3, for all three questions. –  Michael Borgwardt Mar 21 '11 at 15:40
    
@Michael - yeah, I got that. What I meant was question 3 had several sub questions. I was trying to ask if in case I link to a library L under LGPL from proprietary code and NOT distribute it (the library L and its source), is it still ok? –  Neo Mar 21 '11 at 15:44
    
I was just thinking about the whole "free" software philosophy. Lets say I sell GPL software for an ordinary price - lets say $5 for a well written game. One of my customers (lets call him Richard - ironic, I know :P) adds a print statement to my source code and sells my game for $2, under GPL. How is GPL protecting my hard work? Do I have to price all my software at exhorbitantly high prices in order to make a profit? Is Richard not leeching off me? –  Neo Mar 21 '11 at 15:45
    
@CRK: you don't have to mention that you use L, but I think that if you distribute it, you have to include a copy of the LGPL with it. You can of course also ask users to download it or an equivalent library for themselves. –  Michael Borgwardt Mar 21 '11 at 16:03

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