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I'm trying to use the CSS3 :not pseudo class as defined in the specification. According to the spec:

The negation pseudo-class, :not(X), is a functional notation taking a simple selector (excluding the negation pseudo-class itself) as an argument. It represents an element that is not represented by its argument

So I would expect to be able to do something like this:

p:not(.class1, .class2)

But it does not seem to work in Safari or Firefox, which are supposed to have FULL support for this selector.

It does work when the argument is a single selector, for example:

Here is an example showing the issue: jsFiddle Example

p:not(.class1)

According to this blog post, this author suggests that you should be able to specify multiple selectors as the argument.

Also according to this CSS3 SitePoint Reference, Firefox, Safari and Chrome have FULL support for the :not selector.

Am I misinterpreting the specification or do browsers actually only have partial support for this selector?

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2  
.class1, .class2 is not a simple selector, and by definition :not(X) only accepts simple selectors as arguments. –  Šime Vidas Mar 21 '11 at 14:22
1  
That blog post is wrong. If Firefox supported multiple selectors in a single negation, it doesn't anymore, and that behavior was a bug. –  BoltClock Mar 21 '11 at 14:30
    
@BoltClock Correct - tried it out in FF3.6 and FF4 and it won't work so the guy must be wrong, also blog date is 25 August 2008 when css3 was still a baby. –  easwee Mar 21 '11 at 14:41

3 Answers 3

up vote 10 down vote accepted

In CSS the comma (,) separates selectors. It's not a selector itself so it can't be used inside a selector. So depending of if you want to apply the rule to

  • paragraphs that are not .class1 and paragraphs that are not .class2,
  • paragraphs that have neither .class1 nor class2 or
  • paragraphs that don't have .class1 and .class2

it's

p:not(.class1), p:not(.class2) {
}

or

p:not(.class1):not(.class2) {
}

or

p:not(.class1.class2) {
}

BTW, IMHO it's better to avoid :not if possible and in this case, for example, have a general rule that applies to all ps (with the properties you want to set in the :notrule) and one that applies to ones with the class and overrides the properties of the first rule if necessary.

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1  
p:not(.class1.class2) will not work. That is not valid markup. –  easwee Mar 21 '11 at 14:34
2  
@easwee: Well, it's not markup either :P –  BoltClock Mar 21 '11 at 14:35
    
@BoltClock Yeah syntax/code/whatever - I tend to confuse the terms often. English not my native language :) –  easwee Mar 21 '11 at 14:38
    
Still does not seem to work, see: jsfiddle.net/yw3fE - I want all P tags that have either .po or .no to be excluded. –  Camsoft Mar 21 '11 at 14:54
    
Ok it seems that your second example has the desired effect. –  Camsoft Mar 21 '11 at 14:57

Be careful with:

p:not(.class1), p:not(.class2) {
}

Because, it is same as calling p {} (when you separate by ",", it means union). The first effected tags set (the p tags without the class1 class) unions with the second effected tags set (p tags without the class2 class).

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You can chain them (listing them didn't work for me either)...

p:not(.class1):not(.class2) {
  ...  
}

jsFiddle.

Works for me in Chrome 10.

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