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I need to measure CPU time of a function like following:

t <- getCPUTime
res <- callTheFunction input
t' <- getCPUTime
print $ t' - t

The problem comes from the laziness of Haskell. callTheFunction must be strictly evaluated. I've searched a lot and tried to use seq and $! but without success. I think this should be a quite common task. Anyway, I need some help. Thanks.

Update: Thanks for all the help, especially @FUZxxl. It reminds me the difference between WHNF (Weak Head Normal Form) and Normal Form. Haskell/Laziness helps understand the lazy evaluation of Haskell.

What I needed is one more step evaluation. Anyway $! or evaluate both works as long as only WHNF is needed for res:

t <- getCPUTime
res <- callTheFunction input
evaluate res  OR  return $! res
t' <- getCPUTime
print $ t' - t
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1  
This doesn't fix your strictness issue at all (use evaluate for that) but for the quick-and-dirty timings (i.e. simpler than criterion) you can just use the timeIt package: hackage.haskell.org/package/timeit –  sclv Mar 21 '11 at 18:22

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Use the function evaluate :: a -> IO a from Control.Exception. It evaluates its argument to WHNF when the corresponding IO-action is executed. You have to make sure that WHNF is sufficient for your function though.

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Note that WHNF is often not sufficient. As an example, WHNF of a list is only the first cons. –  John L Mar 21 '11 at 22:03
    
You could combine evaluate and enforcing than. –  FUZxxl Mar 22 '11 at 8:39

If you are trying to do benchmarks please use the excellent criterion library, which is on Hackage.

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If you're benchmarking then you should use Criterion. Otherwise use NFData (rnf) and bang patterns to force evaluation.

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The problem is, that especially in an IO context, seqand rnf often aren't strong enough to eval the expression to the desired grade. –  FUZxxl Mar 21 '11 at 16:24
    
@FUZxxl I'm not clear on what you're getting at. If you at any point (before or after the IO operation) have a value of type NFData a => a then bang patterns and rnf should be sufficient (certainly better than WHNF for many cases). –  Thomas M. DuBuisson Mar 21 '11 at 17:00
    
I just read about this. I'm quite unshure. –  FUZxxl Mar 21 '11 at 17:03

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