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Does unreachable code within #ifdef and #endif get removed during compile/link time or kept in the executable even though it can not be reached?

#ifdef DEBUG
// some debug operations
#endif

Is the debug operation code still kept after compilation without DEBUG flag, and if it is will it affect the performance of release build?

EDIT:

If there were some modules used only in the debug operation, and if it is linked into the program, will this affect the performance?

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2 Answers

up vote 11 down vote accepted

The preprocessor will completely remove such code - the compiler doesn't even get to see it.

You can e.g. use g++ -E to have a look at what the preprocessor does, and what the compiler gets to see.

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If there were some modules used only in the debug operation, and if it is linked into the program, will this affect the performance? –  Atomble Mar 21 '11 at 15:24
    
@Atomble: Depends on your definition of modules, and how they're linked. An unneeded DLL would reduce application startup time by a very small amount of time. But code that isn't executed won't affect the run-time performance of your app. –  Erik Mar 21 '11 at 15:25
    
@Atomble: Assuming the debug modules aren't huge enough to cause memory to be swapped out, no. Linking in unused modules won't affect performance in the slightest. –  nmichaels Mar 21 '11 at 15:28
    
say that I have a unit test module, it was compiled into unittest.o and it was just static linked to main.o –  Atomble Mar 21 '11 at 15:29
    
@Atomble: If it's unused it's very likely that the linker completely removes it. Either way, it wouldn't matter for performance. –  Erik Mar 21 '11 at 15:30
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It's removed by the preprocessor (with an external preprocessor, blank lines are usually substituted).

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