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Is it indeed possible to allocate multiple shared arrays in CUDA Fortran without having to resort to having just one shared array and using index offsetting?

Pointers don't work, the 'pointer' and 'target' attributes conflict with the 'shared' attribute.

This is what I want to acheive:

  attributes(global) subroutine shared_sub_arrays()

    integer :: i

    real, shared, dimension(*), target :: alldata
    real, shared, dimension(:), pointer :: left
    real, shared, dimension(:), pointer :: centre
    real, shared, dimension(:), pointer :: right

    i = threadIdx%x

    left   => alldata(1:3)
    centre => alldata(4:6)
    right  => alldata(7:9)    

    left(i) = 1.0
    centre(i) = 2.0
    right(i) = 3.0

  end subroutine shared_sub_arrays

Does anyone know of another way to do this?

Thanks in advance for the help

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Is the shared array size known at launch time? –  fabrizioM Mar 21 '11 at 17:26
    
I want to be able to launch multiple instances with different array sizes, so short of editing the source code for each array size, I need to use dynamic memory allocation –  Eddy Mar 24 '11 at 9:31

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

From the Portland CUDA Fortran manual:

These rules apply to device data:

  • Device variables and arrays may not have the Pointer or Target attributes.

So I guess that's just not possible. As for other ways to do it, you could manually keep track of the indices (which seems you don't want to do), or use a matrix with 3 columns, e.g.

real, shared, dimension(:,:) :: alldata
allocate(data(N,3))

! name indices
left=1
centre=2
right=3

! access the columns
alldata(i,left)
alldata(i,centre)
alldata(i,right)
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