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I know from reading the MSDN documentation that the "primary" use of the IDisposable interface is to clean up unmanaged resources.

To me, "unmanaged" means things like database connections, sockets, window handles, etc. But, I've seen code where the Dispose method is implemented to free managed resources, which seems redundant to me, since the garbage collector should take care of that for you.

For example:

public class MyCollection : IDisposable
{
    private List<String> _theList = new List<String>();
    private Dictionary<String, Point> _theDict = new Dictionary<String, Point>();

    // Die, clear it up! (free unmanaged resources)
    public void Dispose()
    {
        _theList.clear();
        _theDict.clear();
        _theList = null;
        _theDict = null;
    }

My question is, does this make the garbage collector free memory used by MyCollection any faster than it normally would?

edit: So far people have posted some good examples of using IDisposable to clean up unmanaged resources such as database connections and bitmaps. But suppose that _theList in the above code contained a million strings, and you wanted to free that memory now, rather than waiting for the garbage collector. Would the above code accomplish that?

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9  
Its amazing how much confusion this has caused over the years (die pig dog die!) –  James Westgate May 26 '10 at 21:31
11  
I like the accepted answer because it tell you the correct 'pattern' of using IDisposable, but like the OP said in his edit, it does not answer his intended question. IDisposable does not 'call' the GC, it just 'marks' an object as destroyable. But what is the real way to free memory 'right now' instead of waiting for GC to kick in? I think this question deserves more discussion. –  desigeek Oct 1 '10 at 17:15
11  
IDisposable doesn't mark anything. The Dispose method does what it has to do to clean up resources used by the instance. This has nothing to do with GC. –  John Saunders Oct 1 '10 at 19:37
1  
@John. I do understand IDisposable. And which is why I said that the accepted answer does not answer the OP's intended question(and follow-up edit) about whether IDisposable will help in <i>freeing memory</i>. Since IDisposable has nothing to do with freeing memory, only resources, then like you said, there is no need to set the managed references to null at all which is what OP was doing in his example. So, the correct answer to his question is "No, it does not help free memory any faster. In fact, it does not help free memory at all, only resources". But anyway, thanks for your input. –  desigeek Oct 7 '10 at 15:17
6  
@desigeek: if this is the case, then you should not have said "IDisposable does not 'call' the GC, it just 'marks' an object as destroyable" –  John Saunders Oct 7 '10 at 15:31

15 Answers 15

up vote 1192 down vote accepted

The point of Dispose is to free unmanaged resources. It needs to be done at some point, otherwise they will never be cleaned up. The garbage collector doesn't know how to call DeleteHandle() on a variable of type IntPtr, it doesn't know whether or not it needs to call DeleteHandle().

Note: What is an unmanaged resource? If you found it in the Microsoft .NET Framework: it's managed. If you went poking around MSDN yourself, it's unmanaged. Anything you've used P/Invoke calls to get outside of the nice comfy world of everything available to you in the .NET Framwork is unmanaged – and you're now responsible for cleaning it up.

The object that you've created needs to expose some method, that the outside world can call, in order to clean up unmanaged resources. There is even a standardized name for this method:

public void Dispose()

There was even an interface created, IDisposable, that has just that one method:

public interface IDisposable
{
   void Dispose()
}

So you make your object expose the IDisposable interface, and that way you promise that you've written that single method to clean up your unmanaged resources:

public void Dispose()
{
   Win32.DestroyHandle(this.gdiCursorBitmapStreamFileHandle);
}

And you're done. Except you can do better.


What if your object has allocated a 250MB System.Drawing.Bitmap (i.e. the .NET managed Bitmap class) as some sort of frame buffer? Sure, this is a managed .NET object, and the garbage collector will free it. But do you really want to leave 250MB of memory just sitting there – waiting for the garbage collector to eventually come along and free it? What if there's an open database connection? Surely we don't want that connection sitting open, waiting for the GC to finalize the object.

If the user has called Dispose() (meaning they no longer plan to use the object) why not get rid of those wasteful bitmaps and database connections?

So now we will:

  • get rid of unmanaged resources (because we have to), and
  • get rid of managed resources (because we want to be helpful)

So let's update our Dispose() method to get rid of those managed objects:

public void Dispose()
{
   //Free unmanaged resources
   Win32.DestroyHandle(this.gdiCursorBitmapStreamFileHandle);

   //Free managed resources too
   if (this.databaseConnection != null)
   {
      this.databaseConnection.Dispose();
      this.databaseConnection = null;
   }
   if (this.frameBufferImage != null)
   {
      this.frameBufferImage.Dispose();
      this.frameBufferImage = null;
   }
}

And all is good, except you can do better!


What if the person forgot to call Dispose() on your object? Then they would leak some unmanaged resources!

Note: They won't leak managed resources, because eventually the garbage collector is going to run, on a background thread, and free the memory associated with any unused objects. This will include your object, and any managed objects you use (e.g. the Bitmap and the DbConnection).

If the person forgot to call Dispose(), we can still save their bacon! We still have a way to call it for them: when the garbage collector finally gets around to freeing (i.e. finalizing) our object.

Note: The garbage collector will eventually free all managed objects. When it does, it calls the Finalize method on the object. The GC doesn't know, or care, about your Dispose method. That was just a name we chose for a method we call when we want to get rid of unmanaged stuff.

The destruction of our object by the Garbage collector is the perfect time to free those pesky unmanaged resources. We do this by overriding the Finalize() method.

Note: In C#, you don't explicitly override the Finalize() method. You write a method that looks like a C++ destructor, and the compiler takes that to be your implementation of the Finalize() method:

~MyObject()
{
    //we're being finalized (i.e. destroyed), call Dispose in case the user forgot to
    Dispose(); //<--Warning: subtle bug! Keep reading!
}

But there's a bug in that code. You see, the garbage collector runs on a background thread; you don't know the order in which two objects are destroyed. It is entirely possible that in your Dispose() code, the managed object you're trying to get rid of (because you wanted to be helpful) is no longer there:

public void Dispose()
{
   //Free unmanaged resources
   Win32.DestroyHandle(this.gdiCursorBitmapStreamFileHandle);

   //Free managed resources too
   if (this.databaseConnection != null)
   {
      this.databaseConnection.Dispose(); <-- crash, GC already destroyed it
      this.databaseConnection = null;
   }
   if (this.frameBufferImage != null)
   {
      this.frameBufferImage.Dispose(); <-- crash, GC already destroyed it
      this.frameBufferImage = null;
   }
}

So what you need is a way for Finalize() to tell Dispose() that it should not touch any managed resources (because they might not be there anymore), while still freeing unmanaged resources.

The standard pattern to do this is to have Finalize() and Dispose() both call a third(!) method; where you pass a Boolean saying if you're calling it from Dispose() (as opposed to Finalize()), meaning it's safe to free managed resources.

This internal method could be given some arbitrary name like "CoreDispose", or "MyInternalDispose", but is tradition to call it Dispose(Boolean):

protected void Dispose(Boolean disposing)

But a more helpful parameter name might be:

protected void Dispose(Boolean itIsSafeToAlsoFreeManagedObjects)
{
   //Free unmanaged resources
   Win32.DestroyHandle(this.gdiCursorBitmapStreamFileHandle);

   //Free managed resources too, but only if I'm being called from Dispose
   //(If I'm being called from Finalize then the objects might not exist
   //anymore
   if (itIsSafeToAlsoFreeManagedObjects)  
   {    
      if (this.databaseConnection != null)
      {
         this.databaseConnection.Dispose();
         this.databaseConnection = null;
      }
      if (this.frameBufferImage != null)
      {
         this.frameBufferImage.Dispose();
         this.frameBufferImage = null;
      }
   }
}

And you change your implementation of the IDisposable.Dipose() method to:

public void Dispose()
{
   Dispose(true); //I am calling you from Dispose, it's safe
}

and your finalizer to:

~MyObject()
{
   Dispose(false); //I am *not* calling you from Dispose, it's *not* safe
}

Note: If your object descends from an object that implements Dispose, then don't forget to call their base Dispose method when you override Dispose:

public Dispose()
{
    try
    {
        Dispose(true); //true: safe to free managed resources
    }
    finally
    {
        base.Dispose();
    }
}

And all is good, except you can do better!


If the user calls Dispose() on your object, then everything has been cleaned up. Later on, when the garbage collector comes along and calls Finalize, it will then call Dispose again.

Not only is this wasteful, but if your object has junk references to objects you already disposed of from the last call to Dispose(), you'll try to dispose them again!

You'll notice in my code I was careful to remove references to objects that I've disposed, so I don't try to call Dispose on a junk object reference. But that didn't stop a subtle bug from creeping in.

When the user calls Dispose(): the handle gdiCursorBitmapStreamFileHandle is destroyed. Later when the garbage collector runs, it will try to destroy the same handle again.

protected void Dispose(Boolean iAmBeingCalledFromDisposeAndNotFinalize)
{
   //Free unmanaged resources
   Win32.DestroyHandle(this.gdiCursorBitmapStreamFileHandle); <--double destroy 
   ...
}

The way you fix this is tell the garbage collector that it doesn't need to bother finalizing the object – its resources have already been cleaned up, and no more work is needed. You do this by calling GC.SuppressFinalize() in the Dispose() method:

public void Dispose()
{
   Dispose(true); //I am calling you from Dispose, it's safe
   GC.SuppressFinalize(this); //Hey, GC: don't bother calling finalize later
}

Now that the user has called Dispose(), we have:

  • freed unmanaged resources
  • freed managed resources

There's no point in the GC running the finalizer – everything's taken care of.


To answer your original question: Why not release memory now, rather than for when the GC decides to do it? I have a facial recognition software that needs to get rid of 530 MB of internal images now, since they're no longer needed. When we don't: the machine grinds to a swapping halt.

Bonus Reading

For anyone who likes the style of this answer (explaining the why, so the how becomes obvious), I suggest you read Chapter One of Don Box's Essential COM:

In 35 pages he explains the problems of using binary objects, and invents COM before your eyes. Once you realize the why of COM, the remaining 300 pages are obvious, and just detail Microsoft's implementation.

I think every programmer who has ever dealt with objects or COM should, at the very least, read the first chapter. It is the best explanation of anything ever.

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337  
This answer melts faces. –  Sam Pearson Mar 30 '10 at 21:27
23  
@Daniel Earwicker: It's true. Microsoft would love for you to stop using Win32 altogether, and stick to nicely abstractable, portable, device independent .NET Framework calls. If you want to go poking around the operating system underneath; because you think you know what OS is running: you're taking your life in your own hands. Not every .NET app is running on Windows, or on a desktop. –  Ian Boyd Apr 2 '10 at 12:53
23  
I really wish I could upvote this more than once. Thanks so much. –  Andrew Koester May 26 '10 at 17:19
21  
This is a great answer but I think it would however benefit from a final code listing for a standard case and for a case where the the class derives from a baseclass that already implements Dispose. e.g having read here (msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa720161%28v=vs.71%29.aspx) as well I have got confused about what I should do when deriving from the class that already implements Dispose (hey I'm new to this). –  integra753 Feb 9 '12 at 12:42
33  
This answer is superb, not only for it's clear though detailed description but, for the use of "And all is good, except you can do better!". It was oddly but pleasingly suspenseful. –  Dan Lugg Oct 17 '12 at 12:43

IDisposable is often used to exploit the using statement and take advantage of an easy way to do deterministic cleanup of managed objects.

public class LoggingContext : IDisposable {
    public Finicky(string name) {
        Log.Write("Entering Log Context {0}", name);
        Log.Indent();
    }
    public void Dispose() {
        Log.Outdent();
    }

    public static void Main() {
        Log.Write("Some initial stuff.");
        try {
            using(new LoggingContext()) {
                Log.Write("Some stuff inside the context.");
                throw new Exception();
            }
        } catch {
            Log.Write("Man, that was a heavy exception caught from inside a child logging context!");
        } finally {
            Log.Write("Some final stuff.");
        }
    }
}
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1  
I like that, personally, but it doesn't really jive with the framework design guidelines. –  mquander Feb 11 '09 at 18:22
    
I would consider it proper design because it enables easy deterministic scopes and scope constructions/cleanups, especially when intermixed with exception-handling, locking, and unmanaged-resource using-blocks in complex ways. The language offers this as a first-class feature. –  yfeldblum Feb 11 '09 at 18:30
    
It doesn't exactly follow the rules specified in the FDG but it is certainly a valid use of the pattern as it is required in order to be used by the "using statement". –  Scott Dorman Feb 11 '09 at 18:44
    
As long as Log.Outdent doesn't throw, there's definitely nothing wrong with this. –  Daniel Earwicker Feb 11 '09 at 19:51

The purpose of the Dispose pattern is to provide a mechanism to clean up both managed and unmanaged resources and when that occurs depends on how the Dispose method is being called. In your example, the use of Dispose is not actually doing anything related to dispose, since clearing a list has no impact on that collection being disposed. Likewise, the calls to set the variables to null also have no impact on the GC.

You can take a look at this article for more details on how to implement the Dispose pattern, but it basically looks like this:

public class SimpleCleanup : IDisposable
{
    // some fields that require cleanup
    private SafeHandle handle;
    private bool disposed = false; // to detect redundant calls

    public SimpleCleanup()
    {
        this.handle = /*...*/;
    }

    protected virtual void Dispose(bool disposing)
    {
        if (!disposed)
        {
            if (disposing)
            {
                // Dispose managed resources.
                if (handle != null)
                {
                    handle.Dispose();
                }
            }

            // Dispose unmanaged managed resources.

            disposed = true;
        }
    }

    public void Dispose()
    {
        Dispose(true);
        GC.SuppressFinalize(this);
    }
}

The method that is the most important here is the Dispose(bool), which actually runs under two different circumstances:

  • disposing == true: the method has been called directly or indirectly by a user's code. Managed and unmanaged resources can be disposed.
  • disposing == false: the method has been called by the runtime from inside the finalizer, and you should not reference other objects. Only unmanaged resources can be disposed.

The problem with simply letting the GC take care of doing the cleanup is that you have no real control over when the GC will run a collection cycle (you can call GC.Collect(), but you really shouldn't) so resources may stay around longer than needed. Remember, calling Dispose() doesn't actually cause a collection cycle or in any way cause the GC to collect/free the object; it simply provides the means to more deterministicly cleanup the resources used and tell the GC that this cleanup has already been performed.

The whole point of IDisposable and the dispose pattern isn't about immediately freeing memory. The only time a call to Dispose will actually even have a chance of immediately freeing memory is when it is handling the disposing == false scenario and manipulating unmanaged resources. For managed code, the memory won't actually be reclaimed until the GC runs a collection cycle, which you really have no control over (other than calling GC.Collect(), which I've already mentioned is not a good idea).

Your scenario isn't really valid since strings in .NET don't use any unamanged resources and don't implement IDisposable, there is no way to force them to be "cleaned up."

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1  
Didn't you forget to implement finalizer? –  Budda Jul 2 '11 at 5:19
    
@Budda: No, he is using a SafeHandle. No need for a destructor. –  Henk Holterman Nov 2 '11 at 11:16
7  
+1 for adding the safety net for multiple calls to Dispose(). The spec says multiple calls should be safe. Too many Microsoft classes fail to implement that, and you get the annoying the ObjectDisposedException. –  Jesse Chisholm Aug 30 '12 at 23:34

If MyCollection is going to be garbage collected anyway, then you shouldn't need to dispose it. Doing so will just churn the CPU more than necessary, and may even invalidate some pre-calculated analysis that the garbage collector has already performed.

I use IDisposable to do things like ensure threads are disposed correctly, along with unmanaged resources.

EDIT In response to Scott's comment:

The only time the GC performance metrics are affected is when a call the [sic] GC.Collect() is made"

Conceptually, the GC maintains a view of the object reference graph, and all references to it from the stack frames of threads. This heap can be quite large and span many pages of memory. As an optimisation, the GC caches its analysis of pages that are unlikely to change very often to avoid rescanning the page unnecessarily. The GC receives notification from the kernel when data in a page changes, so it knows that the page is dirty and requires a rescan. If the collection is in Gen0 then it's likely that other things in the page are changing too, but this is less likely in Gen1 and Gen2. Anecdotally, these hooks were not available in Mac OS X for the team who ported the GC to Mac in order to get the Silverlight plug-in working on that platform.

Another point against unnecessary disposal of resources: imagine a situation where a process is unloading. Imagine also that the process has been running for some time. Chances are that many of that process's memory pages have been swapped to disk. At the very least they're no longer in L1 or L2 cache. In such a situation there is no point for an application that's unloading to swap all those data and code pages back into memory to 'release' resources that are going to be released by the operating system anyway when the process terminates. This applies to managed and even certain unmanaged resources. Only resources that keep non-background threads alive must be disposed, otherwise the process will remain alive.

Now, during normal execution there are ephemeral resources that must be cleaned up correctly (as @fezmonkey points out database connections, sockets, window handles) to avoid unmanaged memory leaks. These are the kinds of things that have to be disposed. If you create some class that owns a thread (and by owns I mean that it created it and therefore is responsible for ensuring it stops, at least by my coding style), then that class most likely must implement IDisposable and tear down the thread during Dispose.

The .NET framework uses the IDisposable interface as a signal, even warning, to developers that the this class must be disposed. I can't think of any types in the framework that implement IDisposable (excluding explicit interface implementations) where disposal is optional.

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Calling Dispose is perfectly valid, legal, and encouraged. Objects that implement IDisposable usually do so for a reason. The only time the GC performance metrics are affected is when a call the GC.Collect() is made. –  Scott Dorman Feb 11 '09 at 21:17
    
Scott, I replied at length in my original answer. Thanks for the down-vote :) –  Drew Noakes Feb 12 '09 at 9:35
    
For many .net classes, disposal is "somewhat" optional, meaning that abandoning instances "usually" won't cause any trouble so long as one doesn't go crazy creating new instances and abandoning them. For example, the compiler-generated code for controls seems to create fonts when the controls are instantiated and abandon them when the forms are disposed; if one creates and disposes thousands of controls , this could tie up thousands of GDI handles, but in most cases controls aren't created and destroyed that much. Nonetheless, one should still try to avoid such abandonment. –  supercat Aug 2 '11 at 15:14
1  
In the case of fonts, I suspect the problem is that Microsoft never really defined what entity is responsible for disposing the "font" object assigned to a control; in some cases, a controls may share a font with a longer-lived object, so having the control Dispose the font would be bad. In other cases, a font will be assigned to a control and nowhere else, so if the control doesn't dispose it nobody will. Incidentally, this difficulty with fonts could have been avoided had there been a separate non-disposable FontTemplate class, since controls don't seem to use the GDI handle of their Font. –  supercat Aug 2 '11 at 15:23

There should be no further calls to an object's methods after Dispose has been called on it (although an object should tolerate further calls to Dispose). Therefore the example in the question is silly. If Dispose is called, then the object itself can be discarded. So the user should just discard all references to that whole object (set them to null) and all the related objects internal to it will automatically get cleaned up.

As for the general question about managed/unmanaged and the discussion in other answers, I think any answer to this question has to start with a definition of an unmanaged resource.

What it boils down to is that there is a function you can call to put the system into a state, and there's another function you can call to bring it back out of that state. Now, in the typical example, the first one might be a function that returns a file handle, and the second one might be a call to CloseHandle.

But - and this is the key - they could be any matching pair of functions. One builds up a state, the other tears it down. If the state has been built but not torn down yet, then an instance of the resource exists. You have to arrange for the teardown to happen at the right time - the resource is not managed by the CLR. The only automatically managed resource type is memory. There are two kinds: the GC, and the stack. Value types are managed by the stack (or by hitching a ride inside reference types), and reference types are managed by the GC.

These functions may cause state changes that can be freely interleaved, or may need to be perfectly nested. The state changes may be threadsafe, or they might not.

Look at the example in Justice's question. Changes to the Log file's indentation must be perfectly nested, or it all goes wrong. Also they are unlikely to be threadsafe.

It is possible to hitch a ride with the garbage collector to get your unmanaged resources cleaned up. But only if the state change functions are threadsafe and two states can have lifetimes that overlap in any way. So Justice's example of a resource must NOT have a finalizer! It just wouldn't help anyone.

For those kinds of resources, you can just implement IDisposable, without a finalizer. The finalizer is absolutely optional - it has to be. This is glossed over or not even mentioned in many books.

You then have to use the using statement to have any chance of ensuring that Dispose is called. This is essentially like hitching a ride with the stack (so as finalizer is to the GC, using is to the stack).

The missing part is that you have to manually write Dispose and make it call onto your fields and your base class. C++/CLI programmers don't have to do that. The compiler writes it for them in most cases.

There is an alternative, which I prefer for states that nest perfectly and are not threadsafe (apart from anything else, avoiding IDisposable spares you the problem of having an argument with someone who can't resist adding a finalizer to every class that implements IDisposable).

Instead of writing a class, you write a function. The function accepts a delegate to call back to:

public static void Indented(this Log log, Action action)
{
    log.Indent();
    try
    {
        action();
    }
    finally
    {
        log.Outdent();
    }
}

And then a simple example would be:

Log.Write("Message at the top");
Log.Indented(() =>
{
    Log.Write("And this is indented");

    Log.Indented(() =>
    {
        Log.Write("This is even more indented");
    });
});
Log.Write("Back at the outermost level again");

The lambda being passed in serves as a code block, so it's like you make your own control structure to serve the same purpose as using, except that you no longer have any danger of the caller abusing it. There's no way they can fail to clean up the resource.

This technique is less useful if the resource is the kind that may have overlapping lifetimes, because then you want to be able to build resource A, then resource B, then kill resource A and then later kill resource B. You can't do that if you've forced the user to perfectly nest like this. But then you need to use IDisposable (but still without a finalizer, unless you have implemented threadsafety, which isn't free).

share|improve this answer
    
Your solution is the Ruby way. –  kizzx2 May 22 '11 at 14:38
    
re: "There should be no further calls to an object's methods after Dispose has been called on it". "Should" being the operative word. If you have asynchronous actions pending, they may come in after your object has been disposed. Causing an ObjectDisposedException. –  Jesse Chisholm Aug 30 '12 at 23:37
    
Yours seems to be the only answer other than mine which touches on the idea that unmanaged resources encapsulate state that the GC doesn't understand. A key aspect of an unmanaged resource, however, is that one or more entities whose state might need clean-up up its state can continue to exist even if the object that "owns" the resource does not. How do you like my definition? Pretty similar, but I think it makes the "resource" a little more noun-ish (it's the "agreement" by the outside object to alter its behavior, in exchange for notification of when its services are no longer needed) –  supercat Apr 26 '13 at 15:43
    
@supercat - if you're interested I wrote the following post a couple of days after I wrote the above answer: smellegantcode.wordpress.com/2009/02/13/… –  Daniel Earwicker Apr 26 '13 at 20:00
    
@DanielEarwicker: Interesting article, though I can think of at least one type of unmanaged resource you don't really cover: subscriptions to events from long-lived objects. Event subscriptions are fungible, but even if memory were unlimited failure to dispose of them could be costly. For example, an enumerator for a collection that allows modification during enumeration might need to subscribe to update notifications from the collection, and a collection may be updated many times in its lifetime. If the enumerators are abandoned without unsubscribing... –  supercat Apr 26 '13 at 21:12

Yep, that code is completely redundant and unnecessary and it doesn't make the garbage collector do anything it wouldn't otherwise do (once an instance of MyCollection goes out of scope, that is.) Especially the .Clear() calls.

Answer to your edit: Sort of. If I do this:

public void WasteMemory()
{
    var instance = new MyCollection(); // this one has no Dispose() method
    instance.FillItWithAMillionStrings();
}

// 1 million strings are in memory, but marked for reclamation by the GC

It's functionally identical to this for purposes of memory management:

public void WasteMemory()
{
    var instance = new MyCollection(); // this one has your Dispose()
    instance.FillItWithAMillionStrings();
    instance.Dispose();
}

// 1 million strings are in memory, but marked for reclamation by the GC

If you really really really need to free the memory this very instant, call GC.Collect(). There's no reason to do this here, though. The memory will be freed when it's needed.

share|improve this answer
    
re: "The memory will be freed when it's needed." Rather say, "when GC decides it's needed." You may see system performance issues before GC decides that memory is really needed. Freeing it up now may not be essential, but may be useful. –  Jesse Chisholm Aug 30 '12 at 23:40
    
There are some corner cases in which nulling out references within a collection may expedite garbage collection of the items referred to thereby. For example, if a large array is created and filled with references to smaller newly-created items, but it isn't needed for very long after that, abandoning the array may cause those items to be kept around until the next Level 2 GC, while zeroing it out first may make the items eligible for the next level 0 or level 1 GC. To be sure, having big short-lived objects on the Large Object Heap is icky anyway (I dislike the design) but... –  supercat Apr 26 '13 at 15:48
    
...zeroing out such arrays before abandoning them my sometimes lessen the GC impact. –  supercat Apr 26 '13 at 15:49

Scenarios I make use of IDisposable: clean up unmanaged resources, unsubscribe for events, close connections

The idiom I use for implementing IDisposable (not threadsafe):

class MyClass : IDisposable {
    // ...

    #region IDisposable Members and Helpers
    private bool disposed = false;

    public void Dispose() {
        Dispose(true);
        GC.SuppressFinalize(this);
    }

    private void Dispose(bool disposing) {
        if (!this.disposed) {
            if (disposing) {
                // cleanup code goes here
            }
            disposed = true;
        }
    }

    ~MyClass() {
        Dispose(false);
    }
    #endregion
}
share|improve this answer
    
Full pattern explanation can be found at msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/b1yfkh5e.aspx –  LicenseQ Feb 11 '09 at 20:41

I won't repeat the usual stuff about Using or freeing un-managed resources, that has all been covered. But I would like to point out what seems a common misconception.
Given the following code

Public Class LargeStuff
  Implements IDisposable
  Private _Large as string()

  'Some strange code that means _Large now contains several million long strings.

  Public Sub Dispose() Implements IDisposable.Dispose
    _Large=Nothing
  End Sub

I realise that the Disposable implementation does not follow current guidelines, but hopefully you all get the idea.
Now, when Dispose is called, how much memory gets freed?

Answer: None.
Calling Dispose can release unmanaged resources, it CANNOT reclaim managed memory, only the GC can do that. Thats not to say that the above isn't a good idea, following the above pattern is still a good idea in fact. Once Dispose has been run, there is nothing stopping the GC re-claiming the memory that was being used by _Large, even though the instance of LargeStuff may still be in scope. The strings in _Large may also be in gen 0 but the instance of LargeStuff might be gen 2, so again, memory would be re-claimed sooner.
There is no point in adding a finaliser to call the Dispose method shown above though. That will just DELAY the re-claiming of memory to allow the finaliser to run.

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If an instance of LargeStuff has been around long enough to make it to Generation 2, and if _Large holds a reference to a newly-created string which is in Generation 0, then if the the instance of LargeStuff is abandoned without nulling out _Large, then string referred to by _Large will be kept around until the next Gen2 collection. Zeroing out _Large may let the string get eliminated at the next Gen0 collection. In most cases, nulling out references is not helpful, but there are cases where it can offer some benefit. –  supercat May 9 '13 at 23:10

If anything, I'd expect the code to be less efficient than when leaving it out.

Calling the Clear() methods are unnecessary, and the GC probably wouldn't do that if the Dispose didn't do it...

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In the example you posted, it still doesn't "free the memory now". All memory is garbage collected, but it may allow the memory to be collected in an earlier generation. You'd have to run some tests to be sure.


The Framework Design Guidelines are guidelines, and not rules. They tell you what the interface is primarily for, when to use it, how to use it, and when not to use it.

I once read code that was a simple RollBack() on failure utilizing IDisposable. The MiniTx class below would check a flag on Dispose() and if the Commit call never happened it would then call Rollback on itself. It added a layer of indirection making the calling code a lot easier to understand and maintain. The result looked something like:

using( MiniTx tx = new MiniTx() )
{
    // code that might not work.

    tx.Commit();
}

I've also seen timing / logging code do the same thing. In this case the Dispose() method stopped the timer and logged that the block had exited.

using( LogTimer log = new LogTimer("MyCategory", "Some message") )
{
    // code to time...
}

So here are a couple of concrete examples that don't do any unmanaged resource cleanup, but do successfully used IDisposable to create cleaner code.

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There are things that the Dispose() operation does in the example code that might have an effect that would not occur due to a normal GC of the MyCollection object.

If the objects referenced by _theList or _theDict are referred to by other objects, then that List<> or Dictionary<> object will not be subject to collection but will suddenly have no contents. If there were no Dispose() operation as in the example, those collections would still contain their contents.

Of course, if this were the situation I would call it a broken design - I'm just pointing out (pedantically, I suppose) that the Dispose() operation might not be completely redundant, depending on whether there are other uses of the List<> or Dictionary<> that are not shown in the fragment.

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They're private fields, so I think it's fair to assume the OP isn't giving out references to them. –  mquander Feb 11 '09 at 21:20
    
1) the code fragment is just example code, so I'm just pointing out that there may be a side-effect that is easy to overlook; 2) private fields are often the target of a getter property/method - maybe too much (getter/setters are considered by some people to be a bit of an anti-pattern). –  Michael Burr Feb 11 '09 at 22:27

One problem with most discussions of "unmanaged resources" is that they don't really define the term, but seem to imply that it has something to do with unmanaged code. While it is true that many types of unmanaged resources do interface with unmanaged code, thinking of unmanaged resources in such terms isn't helpful.

Instead, one should recognize what all managed resources have in common: they all entail an object asking some outside 'thing' to do something on its behalf, to the detriment of some other 'things', and the other entity agreeing to do so until further notice. If the object were to be abandoned and vanish without a trace, nothing would ever tell that outside 'thing' that it no longer needed to alter its behavior on behalf of the object that no longer existed; consequently, the 'thing's usefulness would be permanently diminished.

An unmanaged resource, then, represents an agreement by some outside 'thing' to alter its behavior on behalf of an object, which would useless impair the usefulness of that outside 'thing' if the object were abandoned and ceased to exist. A managed resource is an object which is the beneficiary of such an agreement, but which has signed up to receive notification if it is abandoned, and which will use such notification to put its affairs in order before it is destroyed.

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Well, IMO, definition of unmanaged object is clear; any non-GC object. –  Eonil May 26 at 21:30
    
@Eonil: Unmanaged Object != Unmanaged Resource. Things like events can be implemented entirely using managed objects, but still constitute unmanaged resources because--at least in the case of short-lived objects subscribing to long-lived-objects' events--the GC knows nothing about how to clean them up. –  supercat May 27 at 13:35

If you want to delete right now, use unmanaged memory.

See:

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Apart from its primary use as a way to control the lifetime of system resources (completely covered by the awesome answer of Ian, kudos!), the IDisposable/using combo can also be used to scope the state change of (critical) global resources: the console, the threads, the process, any global object like an application instance.

I've written an article about this pattern: http://pragmateek.com/c-scope-your-global-state-changes-with-idisposable-and-the-using-statement/

It illustrates how you can protect some often used global state in a reusable and readable manner: console colors, current thread culture, Excel application object properties...

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IDisposable is good for unsubscribing from events.

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protected by Tats_innit Aug 19 '13 at 23:32

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