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I'm trying to figure out which of these interfaces I need to implement. They both essentially do the same thing. When would I use one over the other?

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7 Answers 7

up vote 45 down vote accepted

Well they are not quite the same thing as IComparer<T> is implemented on a type that is capable of comparing two different objects while IComparable<T> is implemented on types that are able to compare themselves with other instances of the same type.

I tend to use IComparable<T> for times when I need to know how another instance relates to this instance. IComparer<T> is useful for sorting collections as the IComparer<T> stands outside of the comparison.

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5  
IComparer<T> also allows you to have a class for each type of sort you want. Example; PersonLastFirstNameComparer, PersonFirstLastNameComparer, or PersonAgeComparer. –  eschneider Mar 18 '10 at 21:32
    
Is there an easy way you use to remember them? I tend to have to look it up each time. –  amadib Mar 7 '12 at 21:06
15  
@amadib think IComparable as I'm comparable. which means I can be compared to something else. And read IComparer as I'm a comparer, I simply compare which means I compare some things. –  nawfal Dec 6 '12 at 20:02

Use IComparable<T> when the class has an intrinsic comparison.

Use IComparer<T> when you want a comparison method other than the class' intrinsic comparison, if it has one.

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It depends on the entity. For example following for a class like "Student", it will make sense to have IComparable based on Name.

class Student : IComparable 
{
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public int MathScore { get; set; }
    public int EnglishScore { get; set; }

    public int TotalScore 
    {
        get
        {
            return this.MathScore + this.EnglishScore; 
        }
    }

    public int CompareTo(object obj)
    {
        return CompareTo(obj as Student);  
    }

    public int CompareTo(Student other)
    {
        if (other == null)
        {
            return 1;
        }
        return this.Name.CompareTo(other.Name);  
    }
}

But if a teacher 'A' wants to compare students based on MathScore, and teacher 'B' wants to compare students based on EnglishScore. It will be good idea to implement IComparer separately. (More like a strategy pattern)

class CompareByMathScore : IComparer<Student>
{
    public int Compare(Student x, Student y)
    {
        if (x.MathScore > y.MathScore)
          return 1;
        if (x.MathScore < y.MathScore)
          return -1;
        else
          return 0;
    }
}
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It all depends on whether your type is mutable or not. You should only implement IComparable on non-mutable types. Note that if you implement IComparable, you must override Equals, along with the ==, !=, < and > operators (see Code Analysis warning CA1036).

Quoting Dave G from this blog post:

But the correct answer is to implement IComparer instead of IComparable if your objects are mutable, and pass an instance of the IComparer to sorting functions when necessary.

Since the IComparer is just a disposable object used for sorting at that point in time, your object can have any mutable semantics you desire. Furthermore, it doesn't require or even suggest using Equals, GetHashCode, or == - you're free to define it in any way you please.

Finally, you can define multiple IComparer's for your type for sorting on different fields or with different rules. This is much more flexible than being stuck with one definition.

In short: Use IComparable for value types and IComparer for reference types.

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2  
Love your avatar! –  jpierson Aug 4 '11 at 3:40

As others have said, they don't do the same thing.

In any case, these days I tend not to use IComparer. Why would I? Its responsibility (an external entity used to compare two objects) can be handled much cleaner with a lambda expression, similar to how most of LINQ's methods work. Write a quick lambda which takes the objects to compare as arguments, and returns a bool. And if the object defines its own intrinsic compare operation, it can implement IComparable instead.

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1  
-1: returning a bool is not equivalent to IComparer. IComparer returns a value that can be less than zero/zero/greater than zero and is typically used for sorting. –  Joe Feb 11 '09 at 20:17
    
And when that is what you need, you return an int (or better still, an enum) instead. Is that really a big deal? –  jalf Feb 11 '09 at 20:51
2  
You can even return a bool, since less than is the only operation you need in order to sort a sequence. –  jalf Feb 11 '09 at 20:56
    
an IComparer implementation only needs to be defined once, if you need to use the sorting logic in more places, then the lambda expression will need to be written more times. –  oɔɯǝɹ Feb 6 '10 at 12:26
    
oɔɯǝɹ - Then you can store a reference to the delegate that was written as a lambda expression are reuse it as well. –  jpierson Aug 4 '11 at 3:54

IComparable says an object can be compared with another. IComparer is an object that can compare any two items.

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I would recommend reading http://support.microsoft.com/kb/320727 from Microsoft, it gives extensive explanation and examples.

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