Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

How can I create a singleton class in Objective C?

share|improve this question
    
Possible Duplicate: stackoverflow.com/questions/3911042/… –  Richard J. Ross III Mar 21 '11 at 17:10
    
See : Objective-c singleton –  malinois Mar 21 '11 at 17:11

8 Answers 8

up vote 29 down vote accepted

Okay appDev, you will probably find quite a few different techniques to do this on the web. However, for iOS app development, I think the most convenient way is to do the following:

  • Write your method(s) for getting the singleton object. (Recommendation: use dispatch_once thread and GCD for this).

  • Wrap your method(s) in a macro and add it to your $Project$-Prefix.pch file.

  • Call the one line macro whenever you need singleton object for a class.

Example:

CommonMacros.h:

#define SINGLETON_FOR_CLASS(classname)\
+ (id) shared##classname {\
    static dispatch_once_t pred = 0;\
    __strong static id _sharedObject = nil;\
    dispatch_once(&pred, ^{\
        _sharedObject = [[self alloc] init];\
    });\
    return _sharedObject;\
}

YourProject-Prefix.pch:

...
#import "CommonMacros.h"
...

YourSingletonClass.m:

...
SINGLETON_FOR_CLASS(YourSingletonClass)
...
share|improve this answer
2  

Check out this link for the original source - http://getsetgames.com/2009/08/30/the-objective-c-singleton/

@implementation MySingleton
static MySingleton* _sharedMySingleton = nil;

+(MySingleton*)sharedMySingleton
{
    @synchronized([MySingleton class])
    {
        if (!_sharedMySingleton)
            [[self alloc] init];

        return _sharedMySingleton;
    }

    return nil;
}
share|improve this answer
3  
This is nice, but the assignment is missing: _sharedDataModel = [[self alloc] init]; –  Chuck H Jul 22 '13 at 4:34
    
@ChuckH: Doesn't self represent _sharedMySingleton? –  Chandu May 14 at 18:14
    
@Chandu: In the example above, self does not refer to an instance of the MySingleton class, it refers to to the MySingleton class object. If compiled as-is, the compiler will give a warning that the result of the [[self alloc] init] expression is not used. However, the above example only works because the link to the original source also included an alloc class method which ended up doing the needed assignment. I think it would be much easier to eliminate the alloc class method and do the static variable assignment directly with the results of the alloc/init of the singleton instance. –  Chuck H May 14 at 22:31

You can implement a singleton class in Objective-C .

+ (id)sharedManager {
    static MyManager *sharedMyManager = nil;
    static dispatch_once_t onceToken;
    dispatch_once(&onceToken, ^{
        sharedMyManager = [[self alloc] init];
    });
    return sharedMyManager;
}

- (id)init {
  if (self = [super init]) {
      someProperty = [[NSString alloc] initWithString:@"Default Property Value"];
  }
  return self;
}

http://www.galloway.me.uk/tutorials/singleton-classes/

share|improve this answer
1  
Note that link-only answers are discouraged, SO answers should be the end-point of a search for a solution (vs. yet another stopover of references, which tend to get stale over time). Please consider adding a stand-alone synopsis here, keeping the link as a reference. –  kleopatra Oct 16 '13 at 9:53

I do think this is how we can truly achieve singleton behavior :

@interface SampleSingletonClass : NSObject

+ sharedSampleSingletonClass;

@end


@implementation SampleSingletonClass
static SampleSingletonClass *singletonObject = nil;

+ (id) sharedSampleSingletonClass
{
    if (! singletonObject) {

        singletonObject = [[SampleSingletonClass alloc] init];
    }
    return singletonObject;
}

- (id)init
{
    if (! singletonObject) {

        singletonObject = [super init];
    // Uncomment the following line to see how many times is the init method of the class is called
    // NSLog(@"%s", __PRETTY_FUNCTION__);
    }
    return singletonObject;
}

@end

Here even if one calls init method instead of the intended + (id) SampleSingletonClass; method the actual object is formed just once throughout the app's lifecycle.

share|improve this answer

This is my personal favourite way to do it:

+ (instancetype)sharedObject {
    static id instance;
    static dispatch_once_t onceToken;
    dispatch_once(&onceToken, ^{
        instance = [[self alloc] init];
    });
    return instance;
}
share|improve this answer
    static DBHandler* sDBHandler = nil;

- (id)init
{
    self = [super init];
    if (self) {
        [self checkAndCreateDatabase];
    }
    return self;
}

+(id)sharedDBHandler
{
    @synchronized (self) {
        if (sDBHandler == nil) {
            sDBHandler = [self new];
        }
    }
    return sDBHandler;
}
share|improve this answer

Try this

Singalton class .h file

#import <Foundation/Foundation.h>

@interface GlobleDirector : NSObject
+(GlobleDirector*)shareManager;
@end

Singalton class .m file

#import "GlobleDirector.h"

@implementation GlobleDirector


+(GlobleDirector*)shareManager{

static GlobleDirector *sharedInstance=nil;
static dispatch_once_t  oncePredecate;

dispatch_once(&oncePredecate,^{
    sharedInstance=[[GlobleDirector alloc] init];

 });
return sharedInstance;
}



@end
share|improve this answer

I know it is supposed visitors know what is a singleton but in order to help those they don't, I propose this simple little example with shared data.

The object is used to shared data classes instances or class(es) instances.

@interface SharedData : NSObject {
    id data;
}
- (void)setData:(id)data_;
- (id)data;
@end

@implementation SharedData
//>> singleton
static SharedData *sharedData=nil;
+ (SharedData*)sharedData {
    @synchronized (self) {
        if (sharedData==nil) sharedData=[[self alloc]init];
    }
    return sharedData;
}
//<<
- (void)setData:(id)data_ {
    data=data_;
}
- (id)data {
    return data;
}
@end

... The 1st call (+ sharedData) instantiate the object basing his reference on static (locale shared) variable that it returns as instance ref. The next call only returns reference to the static variable.

The data can be set/get at any time with embedded accessor.

It results a relative simplification to share an object but it is possible to process "manually" by reference sharing.

@synchronized is just needed for multithreading. For simple class(es) instances sharing it's not needed.

An extended explanation here: http://www.galloway.me.uk/tutorials/singleton-classes/

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.