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I have the following item in preferences.xml:

    <ListPreference android:key="pref_movies_min_imdb"
        android:title="@string/pref_movies_min_imdb" 
        android:summary="@string/pref_movies_min_imdb_summary"
        android:entries="@array/pref_movies_min_imdb_array_entries"
        android:entryValues="@array/pref_movies_min_imdb_array_values" 
        android:defaultValue="0"/>

array.xml:

<string-array name="pref_movies_min_imdb_array_entries">
    <item>n/a</item>
    <item>1</item>
    <item>2</item>
    <item>3</item>
    <item>4</item>
    <item>5</item>
    <item>6</item>
    <item>7</item>
    <item>8</item>
    <item>9</item>
    <item>10</item>
</string-array>
<string-array name="pref_movies_min_imdb_array_values">
    <item>0</item>
    <item>1</item>
    <item>2</item>
    <item>3</item>
    <item>4</item>
    <item>5</item>
    <item>6</item>
    <item>7</item>
    <item>8</item>
    <item>9</item>
    <item>10</item>
</string-array>

User hasn't chosen any value in the preferences yet. But in the following code *imdb_rating_min* is added to url:

String minIMDB = prefs.getString("pref_movies_min_imdb", "0");
if (minIMDB != "0"){
    url += "&imdb_rating_min=" + minIMDB;
}

Debugger shows that minIMDB = 0, url = "&imdb_rating_min=0"

Why does it happen so?

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1 Answer

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Use !minIMDB.equals("0") instead of !=:

if (!minIMDB.equals("0")){
    url += "&imdb_rating_min=" + minIMDB;
}

== and != compare memory positions. .equals method compare content of the Strings.

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Strangely in test code two strings may sometimes compare. The compiler can put constant strings at the same location in memory. In general you almost always want .equals unless it's a numeric type or you want to see if two variables are exactly the same object (to see if modifying one will modify the other). –  Bill K Mar 21 '11 at 18:38
    
It's just a matter of performance... the compiler will see if there are two declared strings with the same content, if so, it will put that string in the same memory position. Thus, in those case, you can compare with the == operator. AFAIK, compiler tries to imitate the FlyWeight pattern. –  Cristian Mar 21 '11 at 18:53
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