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i am trying to use the !isset on the '$class' variable to see if it has a value or not, and then base the mysql_query function on that. but it's a no go. see anything wrong?

<?php session_start();  
    $heyyou = $_SESSION['usern'];
    $points = $_SESSION['points']; 
    $school = $_SESSION['school'];
    $class = $_POST['class'];
    $prof = $_POST['prof'];
    $date = $_POST['dater'];
    $fname = $_FILES['fileToUpload']["name"];

     ?>




          <div id='contenttext' class='contenttext'>
        <?php 

@mysql_select_db($database) or die( "Unable to select database");
$query = "INSERT INTO uploadedfiles (usename, filename, date, teacher, class) VALUES ('$heyyou', '$fname', '$date', '$prof', '$class')";

if (!isset($class)){
echo 'You need to pick a class for the content'; }
else{
mysql_query($query); }
    mysql_close(); 

     ?>


<?php 
if (($_FILES["fileToUpload"]["type"] == "image/gif" || $_FILES["fileToUpload"]["type"] == "image/jpeg" || $_FILES["fileToUpload"]["type"] == "image/png") && $_FILES["fileToUpload"]["size"] < 10000000)
  {
  move_uploaded_file($_FILES["fileToUpload"]["tmp_name"],
    "upload/" . $_FILES["fileToUpload"]["name"]);
    echo "Your file has successfully been uploaded, and is awaiting moderator approval for points." . "<html><br><a href='uploadfile.php'>Upload more.</a>";
  }
else
  {
  echo "Files must be either JPEG, GIF, or PNG and less than 10,000 kb";
  }
?>

        </div>
</body>
</html>
share|improve this question
    
whats the problem? probs best not to post your DB details up ;) –  Chimoo Mar 21 '11 at 18:26

6 Answers 6

Two major security problems with your code:

  1. You're wide open to SQL injection attacks (see: http://bobby-tables.com/)
  2. You're blindly trusting the user is not malicious for the file upload. The ['type'] and ['name'] fields are completely under user control, and it's trivial to hack the upload to say it's a gif while still uploading a PHP script. You then use the user-supplied filename, WHICH CAN CONTAIN PATH INFORMATION, and dump it directly to your server. This leaves the door wide open to a malicious user uploading any file they want, anywhere on the server.

Minor point #3:

You don't check if the database query succeeds. Never assume a query succeeds. Even if the SQL statement is perfectly valid, there's far too many other reasons that could make it fail anyways. Always check the query call with ... = mysql_query(...) or die(mysql_error()) as a bare minimum error handler.

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Probably because $class is being set, by you. Try if (empty($class)){

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i see, i was kinda going after it wrong. thanks for the new function –  Shawn Mar 21 '11 at 18:28

I maybe wrong but class is a reserved word try another name and $class != ""

http://www.php.net/manual/en/reserved.keywords.php

BTW remove you DB Conect info please we me be nice but some of the people reading this may not be. ;-)

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1  
While you can't create a constant or function with a reserved keyword, you can create a variable with the same name as a keyword. –  Charles Mar 21 '11 at 18:40
    
Thanks for the clarification. –  webLacky3rdClass Mar 21 '11 at 18:47

Try this, first initialize all your variables and then assign the POST values. Eg:

 $class='';
 $class = $_POST['class'];
 if (!isset($class)){
    echo 'You need to pick a class for the content'; 
 }
share|improve this answer
    
That's a useless step. A variable's created when it's first assigned to. All you're doing is creating then trashing an empty string. –  Marc B Mar 21 '11 at 18:49

You can not use $class since class is a keyword reserved. This may work too:

$query = "INSERT INTO uploadedfiles (usename, filename, date, teacher, class) VALUES ($heyyou, $fname, $date, $prof, $class)";

Since double quote can understand variables when they inside it. Another think is date is a keyword too reserved by MySQL. Finlly try to see what $_POST['class']; content like this: echo $_POST['class']; Because perhaps you forget to give a name to your html element.

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The variable $class is always set because of $class = $_POST['class']. so isset($class) will always be true regardless of class posted value. notice the difference in below statements:

$class = '';
if (isset($class)) {
    echo 'a';
}

if($class) {
    echo 'b';
}

the output is: a


//replace this:
if (!isset($class)){
    echo 'You need to pick a class for the content'; }
else{
    mysql_query($query); 
}

//with this:
if (isset($class) && $class){
    mysql_query($query); 
else{
    echo 'You need to pick a class for the content'; }
}    
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