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I have a following class

public class People
{
    public int id;
    public string nameHash;
    public string name;
}

I need to create a custom collection, consisting of objects of class People, that lets me retrieve elements by its id and nameHash. The collection must have the ability to iterate through its elements using foreach:

foreach (People person in PeopleCollection) { ... }

How do I do that? If you can not give a detailed answer, at least give a brief plan of action. Thanks in advance!

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1  
Please mark this as homework if it is. –  Adam Robinson Mar 21 '11 at 19:29
    
Added homework tag based off of OP comments below. Appears to have been a test question; not sure if school or job related –  Chris Lively Mar 21 '11 at 19:34
    
Yes, homework. Sorry, I am new here. –  Max Mar 21 '11 at 19:46

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you're talking about a large collection and you want faster lookups based on an integer Id or a string NameHash field while still supporting the foreach (Foo f in fooCollection) pattern, then you can roll your own collection that wraps a pair of dictionaries. Crude implementation, not thoroughly tested:

class Person
{
    public int Id { get; private set; }
    public string NameHash { get; private set; }
    public string Name { get; private set; }

    public Person(int id, string nameHash, string name)
    {
        Id = id;
        NameHash = nameHash;
        Name = name;
    }
}

class People : IEnumerable<Person>
{
    private Dictionary<int, Person> personDictionary = new Dictionary<int, Person>();
    private Dictionary<string, int> hashIdMap = new Dictionary<string, int>();

    public void Add(Person person)
    {
        if (person == null)
            throw new ArgumentNullException("person");

        if (personDictionary.ContainsKey(person.Id))
            throw new InvalidOperationException("person Id is already referenced in collection.");

        if (hashIdMap.ContainsKey(person.NameHash))
            throw new InvalidOperationException("person NameHash is already referenced in collection.");

        personDictionary.Add(person.Id, person);
        hashIdMap.Add(person.NameHash, person.Id);
    }

    public Person this[int id]
    {
        get
        {
            if (!personDictionary.ContainsKey(id))
                throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException("Id is not in the collection.");

            return personDictionary[id];
        }
    }

    public Person this[string nameHash]
    {
        get
        {
            if (!hashIdMap.ContainsKey(nameHash))
                throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException("NameHash is not in the collection.");

            return this[hashIdMap[nameHash]];
        }
    }

    public IEnumerator<Person> GetEnumerator()
    {
        foreach (KeyValuePair<int, Person> pair in personDictionary)
            yield return pair.Value;
    }

    IEnumerator IEnumerable.GetEnumerator()
    {
        return this.GetEnumerator();
    }
}

...

static void Main()
{
    Person personA = new Person(1, "A", "Apple");
    Person personB = new Person(2, "B", "Banana");
    Person personC = new Person(3, "C", "Cherry");

    People people = new People();
    people.Add(personA);
    people.Add(personB);
    people.Add(personC);

    Person foo = people[1];
    Person bar = people["C"];

    Debug.Assert(foo.Name == "Apple");
    Debug.Assert(bar.Name == "Cherry");

    foreach (Person person in people)
        Debug.WriteLine(person.Name);
}

Of course, if you're dealing with a small-ish collection, you could very well simply use a List<T> and utilize either LINQ or the Find methods already defined. Such as

Person personA = collection.FirstOrDefault(p => p.Id == 42);
Person personB = collection.Find(p => p.NameHash == "Blah");
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Fantastic, thank you very much for taking your time to write it! –  Max Mar 21 '11 at 20:12
class PeopleList : List<People> {

}

That's pretty much it. Just inherit from List<T> and you're set.

BTW, you should reconsider your naming conventions. 'People' is not a good name for a class that represents a single person. Name it 'Person' instead, and name your list 'People'.

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wow, -1. What the heck. –  kprobst Mar 21 '11 at 19:06
    
Are you leaving it up to him to use Linq / Find / other methods for retrieving items by either the id or nameHash fields? A custom collection could be crafted to support fast lookups for one or both of these pieces of information (depends upon his particular usage scenario as to what may be warranted). –  Anthony Pegram Mar 21 '11 at 19:11
    
There is no custom collection here to speak of, I just recommended he inherit from List<T>. –  kprobst Mar 21 '11 at 19:17
    
Yes, I agree about the naming, but that is an exam question that I was given –  Max Mar 21 '11 at 19:18

Is there a specific reason why it has to be a custom collection? Why not

List<People> PeopleCollection = new List<People>();

you can retrieve elements using id and nameHash and you can iterate over PeopleCollection

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1  
Are you leaving it up to him to use Linq / Find / other methods for retrieving items by either the id or nameHash fields? A custom collection could be crafted to support fast lookups for one or both of these pieces of information (depends upon his particular usage scenario as to what may be warranted). –  Anthony Pegram Mar 21 '11 at 19:10
    
Anthony, it is not a real life scenario, it is a test program that I have to write. It also mentions that "the access time to collection elements via id and nameHash is critical" - Max –  Max Mar 21 '11 at 19:14

You have two choices here:

  1. Inherit from an existing collection type, as shown in other answers.
  2. Implement the System.Collections.IEnumerable or System.Collections.Generic.IEnumerable<T> interface, which also means writing your own implementation of System.Collections.IEnumerator or System.Collections.Generic.IEnumerator<T>
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