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I'm creating my own JavaScript Array-like object and I have methods that call closures. I was just wondering where was the most efficient place to define a closure.

For example, imagine I have a map function and a chop function:

MyObject.prototype = 
{
  map: function(fn) { ... applies fn to each element ... };

  chop: function() 
  { this.map( 
    function(element) 
    {
      ... chop off last character ... 
    } 
  )};
}

Is it more efficient to do this instead?

MyObject.prototype = 
{
  map: function(fn) { ... applies fn to each element ... };

  __chop: function(element) 
  {
    ... chop off last character ... 
  }

  chop: function() 
  { this.map(this.__chop) };
}
share|improve this question
    
shouldn't the calls to map() read this.map(this.__chop)? –  Christoph Feb 11 '09 at 19:14
    
right, my mistake, I'll edit it –  cdmckay Feb 11 '09 at 19:40
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4 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The second one is more efficient. This

  chop: function() 
  { map( 
    function(element) 
    {
      ... chop off last character ... 
    } 
  )}

will create a new function object on each call to chop() with the respective runtime and memory overhead. As there won't be any lingering references to the new object, it can be immediately gargage collected, but it's still bad practice to create more objects than necessary.

I'd suggest the following pattern:

MyObject.prototype = (function() {

    function map(fn) { ... }

    function chopElement(element) { ... }

    function chop() {
    	this.map(chopElement);
    }

    return {
    	map : map,
    	chop : chop
    };

})();
share|improve this answer
    
I like this approach since it doesn't pollute the "array"'s public interface and it still breaks chopElement out. –  Allain Lalonde Feb 11 '09 at 19:17
    
I upvoted this, but I would be reluctant to add a new pattern for negligible improvements. Could be premature optimization. If this came back to bite me, I would fix just the bottle necks by applying this pattern. –  Juan Mendes Sep 21 '11 at 18:33
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Neither creating the function, nor looking it up are costly operations in JavaScript, so if you have an "array" with a decent # of elements in it, the difference between either method will be negligible.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 better explanation :) –  Andrew Hare Feb 11 '09 at 19:04
    
-1: the overhead of function creation may be small, but you'll get it an each call to chop() –  Christoph Feb 11 '09 at 19:06
    
agreed, still negligible. –  Allain Lalonde Feb 11 '09 at 19:16
    
Yeah but I was looking more for something like Christoph was saying... I know they are negligible but I'm still curious which one is more efficient, however slightly. –  cdmckay Feb 11 '09 at 19:18
1  
@Allain: you can only know if something is negligible or not after benchmarking your application; might be chop() will be called millions of times, meaning millions of unnecesarry function objects have to be created (and garbage collected) –  Christoph Feb 11 '09 at 19:47
show 2 more comments

They are effectively the same thing - go with whichever one is more readable. For what its worth I prefer the second one.

share|improve this answer
    
So there's no difference in terms of how the interpreter deals with those cases? –  cdmckay Feb 11 '09 at 19:01
    
Not really - Allain explains it pretty well in his answer. –  Andrew Hare Feb 11 '09 at 19:04
    
-1: see my answer –  Christoph Feb 11 '09 at 19:07
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Trading a function closure, for another function closure doesn't lead to a more efficient code. The most memory efficient one would be one that does not use closures at all.

__proto__ = {
  map: function(){},
  _chop: function(str){
    return str.slice( str.length, -1 );
  },
  chop: function(arr){ 
    this.map(this._chop, arr);
  }
}

This question rates very high on google for "closure memory usage", I don't think it qualifies. This is a problem that is difficult to diagnose though.

The answer here is more an example of hiding functionality within a closure, but it adds the cost of maintaining that memory space to store those private variables.

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