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I've a file containing all the environmental variables needed for an application to run in the following format...

setenv DISPLAY invest7@example.com
setenv HOST example.com
setenv HOSTNAME sk
...

How would I set the env. variables in bash using the above file? Is there a way to somehow use setenv command in bash?

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1  
It seems a silly question, but you got a very good answer, so well done. –  dmckee Mar 21 '11 at 21:24

3 Answers 3

You can define a function named setenv:

function setenv() { export "$1=$2"; }

To set the envariables, source the file:

. your_file
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thank you so much!!! it worked wonders :) –  Santhana Kumar Mar 21 '11 at 20:22
2  
The eval isn't necessary and avoiding it reduces some security risks: setenv() { export "$1=$2"; }. –  Dennis Williamson Mar 22 '11 at 1:16
    
@Dennis: good point, updated –  eugene y Mar 22 '11 at 8:20

This is an improved version.

# Mimic csh/tsch setenv
function setenv()
{
    if [ $# = 2 ]; then
        export $1=$2;
    else
        echo "Usage: setenv [NAME] [VALUE]";
    fi
}

You're welcome ;)

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Here is a more complete version for ksh/bash. It behaves like csh/tcsh setenv regardless of the number of arguments.

setenv () {
    if (( $# == 0 )); then
        env
        return 0
    fi

    if [[ $1 == *[!A-Za-z0-9_]* ]]; then
        printf 'setenv: not a valid identifier -- %s\n' "$1" >&2
        return 1
    fi

    case $# in
        1)
            export "$1"
            ;;
        2)
            export "$1=$2"
            ;;
        *)
            printf 'Usage: setenv [VARIABLE [VALUE]]\n' >&2
            return 1
    esac
}
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