Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

If I have a string variable who's value is "john is 17 years old" how do I tokenize this using spaces as the delimeter? Would I use awk?

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 21 down vote accepted

Use the shell's automatic tokenization of unquoted variables:

$ string="john is 17 years old"
$ for word in $string; do echo "$word"; done
john
is
17
years
old

If you want to change the delimiter you can set the $IFS variable, which stands for internal field separator. The default value of $IFS is " \t\n" (space, tab, newline).

$ string="john_is_17_years_old"
$ (IFS='_'; for word in $string; do echo "$word"; done)
john
is
17
years
old

(Note that in this second example I added parentheses around the second line. This creates a sub-shell so that the change to $IFS doesn't persist. You generally don't want to permanently change $IFS as it can wreak havoc on unsuspecting shell commands.)

share|improve this answer
    
for your examples, how would you re-use the third token (17) for example? use the for loop and count tokens? –  kurumi Mar 22 '11 at 7:31
1  
@Allen, then i can do this IFS="_";set -- $string; echo $2. or directly set it to an array like what dtmilano did. There is no need to use a for loop isn't it? –  kurumi Mar 24 '11 at 5:40

you can try something like this :

#!/bin/bash
n=0
a=/home/file.txt
for i in `cat ${a} | tr ' ' '\n'` ; do
   str=${str},${i}
   let n=$n+1
   var=`echo "var${n}"`
   echo $var is ... ${i}
done
share|improve this answer
$ string="john is 17 years old"
$ tokens=( $string )
$ echo ${tokens[*]}
share|improve this answer
    
Very nice, feels much more like an array. –  Adam Eberlin Dec 21 '13 at 21:35
$ string="john is 17 years old"
$ set -- $string
$ echo $1
john
$ echo $2
is
$ echo $3
17
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.