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How can I calculate division and modulo for integer numbers in c#?

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9  
This might be too basic, but it is a real question... –  Aryabhatta Mar 21 '11 at 20:26

4 Answers 4

up vote 47 down vote accepted

Before asking questions of this kind, please check MSDN documentation.

When you divide two integers, the result is always an integer. For example, the result of 5 / 2 is 2. To determine the remainder of 5 / 2, use the modulo operator (%).

int a = 5;
int b = 3;

int div = a / b; //div is 1
int mod = a % b; //mod is 2
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2  
% returns the remainder, not the modulus (as you point out). They arent the same thing, and can cause problems when dealing with unusual cases (e.g. negative indexes). However, it can be used like the modulus operator when just looking for, e.g., every 10th iteration of a weakly positive indexer. Perhaps you could explain how to calculate the real modulus? –  Cor_Blimey Sep 12 '12 at 23:14
1  
True, I read posts like this, and I had problems in my application :) –  zgnilec Apr 1 '13 at 14:39
1  
...What exactly is the point of declaring a and b if you aren't going to use them? :D –  aboveyou00 Apr 27 '13 at 16:54
    
@aboveyou00: fixed that for you! –  Sir Crispalot Oct 3 '13 at 11:40
    
@Cor_Blimey: The simplest, safest, and most readable way to calculate the modulus is probably to calculate the remainder and--if it's negative, add the base. If the code is ported to a platform which includes a real modulus operator, the adjust-if-negative code may be redundant, but harmless. If one needs both the quotient and real modulus, the safe approach would be to use / for the division, multiply and subtract to yield the remainder of whatever form, and if it's necessary to adjust the remainder, adjust the quotient as well. That will work regardless of what the language does for "/". –  supercat Jan 31 '14 at 17:36

There is also Math.DivRem

quotient = Math.DivRem(dividend, divisor, out remainder);
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Division is performed using the / operator:

result = a / b;

Modulo division is done using the % operator:

result = a % b;
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1  
+1: Conveniently leaving out the type makes it a better answer :-) I believe this works with System.Numeric.BigInteger in 4.0 too. –  Aryabhatta Mar 21 '11 at 20:15
2  
% --> as Cor_Blimey said, it returns remainder not the modulus. For example: (-5 % 3) == -2 [C#], -5 mod 3 = 1 [wolframalpha.com]. –  zgnilec Apr 1 '13 at 14:35

Fun fact!

The 'modulus' operation is defined as:

a % n ==> a - (a/n) * n

Ref:Modular Arithmetic

So you could roll your own, although it will be FAR slower than the built in % operator:

public static int Mod(int a, int n)
{
    return a - (int)((double)a / n) * n;
}

Edit: wow, misspoke rather badly here originally, thanks @joren for catching me

Now here I'm relying on the fact that division + cast-to-int in C# is equivalent to Math.Floor (i.e., it drops the fraction), but a "true" implementation would instead be something like:

public static int Mod(int a, int n)
{
    return a - (int)Math.Floor((double)a / n) * n;
}

In fact, you can see the differences between % and "true modulus" with the following:

var modTest =
    from a in Enumerable.Range(-3, 6)
    from b in Enumerable.Range(-3, 6)
    where b != 0
    let op = (a % b)
    let mod = Mod(a,b)
    let areSame = op == mod
    select new 
    { 
        A = a,
        B = b,
        Operator = op, 
        Mod = mod, 
        Same = areSame
    };
Console.WriteLine("A      B     A%B   Mod(A,B)   Equal?");
Console.WriteLine("-----------------------------------");
foreach (var result in modTest)
{
    Console.WriteLine(
        "{0,-3} | {1,-3} | {2,-5} | {3,-10} | {4,-6}", 
        result.A,
        result.B,
        result.Operator, 
        result.Mod, 
        result.Same);
}

Results:

A      B     A%B   Mod(A,B)   Equal?
-----------------------------------
-3  | -3  | 0     | 0          | True  
-3  | -2  | -1    | -1         | True  
-3  | -1  | 0     | 0          | True  
-3  | 1   | 0     | 0          | True  
-3  | 2   | -1    | 1          | False 
-2  | -3  | -2    | -2         | True  
-2  | -2  | 0     | 0          | True  
-2  | -1  | 0     | 0          | True  
-2  | 1   | 0     | 0          | True  
-2  | 2   | 0     | 0          | True  
-1  | -3  | -1    | -1         | True  
-1  | -2  | -1    | -1         | True  
-1  | -1  | 0     | 0          | True  
-1  | 1   | 0     | 0          | True  
-1  | 2   | -1    | 1          | False 
0   | -3  | 0     | 0          | True  
0   | -2  | 0     | 0          | True  
0   | -1  | 0     | 0          | True  
0   | 1   | 0     | 0          | True  
0   | 2   | 0     | 0          | True  
1   | -3  | 1     | -2         | False 
1   | -2  | 1     | -1         | False 
1   | -1  | 0     | 0          | True  
1   | 1   | 0     | 0          | True  
1   | 2   | 1     | 1          | True  
2   | -3  | 2     | -1         | False 
2   | -2  | 0     | 0          | True  
2   | -1  | 0     | 0          | True  
2   | 1   | 0     | 0          | True  
2   | 2   | 0     | 0          | True  
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"Now here I'm relying on the fact that integer division in C# is equivalent to Math.Floor (i.e., it drops the fraction)" - But it's not. Integer divison rounds towards zero, Math.Floor rounds towards negative infinity. –  Joren Mar 19 '13 at 14:09
    
@Joren Sorry, but no - try running this: Enumerable.Range(0, 10).Select(x => (double)x / 10.0).Select(x => (int)x).ToList().ForEach(x => Console.WriteLine(x)); - all 0's –  JerKimball Mar 19 '13 at 14:26
1  
First, I'm talking about integer division. What happens if you do a floating-point division and then cast to integer is irrelevant (even though it gives the same result). Second, I'm not sure why you would expect integers between 0 and 9 to give anything other than 0 after dividing by 10 and truncating to the integer part. If that resulted in 1 that would be rounding away from zero or towards positive infinity. Third, there is no difference whatsoever between rounding towards zero and rounding towards negative infinity for positive numbers, so you're not even addressing the issue. –  Joren Mar 19 '13 at 16:02
    
Math.Floor(-10.0 / 3.0) and -10 / 3 are not the same thing. –  Joren Mar 19 '13 at 16:07
    
@joren ah, I see the disconnect here - no, I'm not performing integer division, I'm performing double division, then casting the result to integer - very different. –  JerKimball Mar 19 '13 at 16:12

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