Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Using the async ctp from Microsoft for .NET, is it possible to catch an exception thrown by an async method in the calling method?

public async void Foo()
{
    var x = await DoSomethingAsync();
    /* Handle the result, but sometimes an exception might be thrown
       For example, DoSomethingAsync get's data from the network
       and the data is invalid... a ProtocolException might be thrown */
}

public void DoFoo()
{
    try
    {
        Foo();
    }
    catch (ProtocolException ex)
    {
          /* The exception will never be caught
             Instead when in debug mode, VS2010 will warn and continue
             when deployed the app will simply crash. */
    }
}

So basically I want the exception from the async code to bubble up in to my calling code if that is even possible at all.

share|improve this question
1  
Does this give you any help? social.msdn.microsoft.com/Forums/en/async/thread/… –  svrist Mar 21 '11 at 20:40
add comment

5 Answers 5

up vote 18 down vote accepted

It's somewhat weird to read (a mind f*** is how I'm finding it!) but yes, the exception will bubble up to the calling code - but it will only do so if you await the call to Foo

public async void DoFoo()
{
    try
    {
        await Foo();
    }
    catch (ProtocolException ex)
    {
          /* The exception will be caught because you've awaited the call. */
    }
}

This explanation http://www.interact-sw.co.uk/iangblog/2010/11/01/csharp5-async-exceptions is pretty good - it discusses the steps the compiler takes to achieve this magic.

share|improve this answer
    
Thnx for the quick reply, btw what do you mean it's weird, all suggestions are welcome, don't hold back , it's how I learn :p –  TimothyP Mar 21 '11 at 20:46
    
I actually mean it's straight-forward to read - whereas I know what's actually going on is really complicated - so my brain is telling me not to believe my eyes... –  Stuart Mar 21 '11 at 21:01
    
Exception propagation is one of my personal favorite parts of the design, in Async for C#/VB :-) Lambdas are nice for callbacks, but for chained async tasks, prior to C#/VB async there wasn't a clean way to unify exception handling. That's one of the really nice parts of baking it into the language. –  Theo Yaung Mar 22 '11 at 16:45
1  
Shouldn't DoFoo() be marked async here? –  zmb Nov 3 '13 at 14:47
1  
@Sornii it's good practice to return Task - as then callers can choose to wait or await if they want to - but it's not essential. –  Stuart Mar 26 at 7:58
show 6 more comments

Your code does not what you think. Async methods will return immediately after the method begins waiting for the async result. To see what is going on it is educational to add some tracing to see how the thread interaction is doing.

In the following example I do

  • Create 4 tasks
  • Each task will asynchronously increment a number and return the incremented number
  • When the async result has arrived it is traced.

    static TypeHashes _type = new TypeHashes(typeof(Program));        
    private void Run()
    {
        TracerConfig.Reset("debugoutput");
    
        using (Tracer t = new Tracer(_type, "Run"))
        {
            for (int i = 0; i < 4; i++)
            {
                DoSomeThingAsync(i);
            }
        }
        Application.Run();  // Start window message pump to prevent termination
    }
    
    
    private async void DoSomeThingAsync(int i)
    {
        using (Tracer t = new Tracer(_type, "DoSomeThingAsync"))
        {
            t.Info("Hi in DoSomething {0}",i);
    
            try
            {
                int result = await Calculate(i);
                t.Info("Got async result: {0}", result);
            }
            catch (ArgumentException ex)
            {
                t.Error("Got argument exception: {0}", ex);
            }
        }
    }
    
    
    Task<int> Calculate(int i)
    {
        var t = new Task<int>(() =>
        {
            using (Tracer t2 = new Tracer(_type, "Calculate"))
            {
                if( i % 2 == 0 )
                    throw new ArgumentException(String.Format("Even argument {0}", i));
                return i++;
            }
        });
        t.Start();
        return t;
    }
    

When you observe the traces

22:25:12.649  02172/02820 {          AsyncTest.Program.Run 
22:25:12.656  02172/02820 {          AsyncTest.Program.DoSomeThingAsync     
22:25:12.657  02172/02820 Information AsyncTest.Program.DoSomeThingAsync Hi in DoSomething 0    
22:25:12.658  02172/05220 {          AsyncTest.Program.Calculate    
22:25:12.659  02172/02820 {          AsyncTest.Program.DoSomeThingAsync     
22:25:12.659  02172/02820 Information AsyncTest.Program.DoSomeThingAsync Hi in DoSomething 1    
22:25:12.660  02172/02756 {          AsyncTest.Program.Calculate    
22:25:12.662  02172/02820 {          AsyncTest.Program.DoSomeThingAsync     
22:25:12.662  02172/02820 Information AsyncTest.Program.DoSomeThingAsync Hi in DoSomething 2    
22:25:12.662  02172/02820 {          AsyncTest.Program.DoSomeThingAsync     
22:25:12.662  02172/02820 Information AsyncTest.Program.DoSomeThingAsync Hi in DoSomething 3    
22:25:12.664  02172/02756          } AsyncTest.Program.Calculate Duration 4ms   
22:25:12.666  02172/02820          } AsyncTest.Program.Run Duration 17ms  ---- Run has completed. The async methods are now scheduled on different threads. 
22:25:12.667  02172/02756 Information AsyncTest.Program.DoSomeThingAsync Got async result: 1    
22:25:12.667  02172/02756          } AsyncTest.Program.DoSomeThingAsync Duration 8ms    
22:25:12.667  02172/02756 {          AsyncTest.Program.Calculate    
22:25:12.665  02172/05220 Exception   AsyncTest.Program.Calculate Exception thrown: System.ArgumentException: Even argument 0   
   at AsyncTest.Program.c__DisplayClassf.Calculateb__e() in C:\Source\AsyncTest\AsyncTest\Program.cs:line 124   
   at System.Threading.Tasks.Task`1.InvokeFuture(Object futureAsObj)    
   at System.Threading.Tasks.Task.InnerInvoke()     
   at System.Threading.Tasks.Task.Execute()     
22:25:12.668  02172/02756 Exception   AsyncTest.Program.Calculate Exception thrown: System.ArgumentException: Even argument 2   
   at AsyncTest.Program.c__DisplayClassf.Calculateb__e() in C:\Source\AsyncTest\AsyncTest\Program.cs:line 124   
   at System.Threading.Tasks.Task`1.InvokeFuture(Object futureAsObj)    
   at System.Threading.Tasks.Task.InnerInvoke()     
   at System.Threading.Tasks.Task.Execute()     
22:25:12.724  02172/05220          } AsyncTest.Program.Calculate Duration 66ms      
22:25:12.724  02172/02756          } AsyncTest.Program.Calculate Duration 57ms      
22:25:12.725  02172/05220 Error       AsyncTest.Program.DoSomeThingAsync Got argument exception: System.ArgumentException: Even argument 0  

Server stack trace:     
   at AsyncTest.Program.c__DisplayClassf.Calculateb__e() in C:\Source\AsyncTest\AsyncTest\Program.cs:line 124   
   at System.Threading.Tasks.Task`1.InvokeFuture(Object futureAsObj)    
   at System.Threading.Tasks.Task.InnerInvoke()     
   at System.Threading.Tasks.Task.Execute()     

Exception rethrown at [0]:      
   at System.Runtime.CompilerServices.TaskAwaiter.EndAwait()    
   at System.Runtime.CompilerServices.TaskAwaiter`1.EndAwait()  
   at AsyncTest.Program.DoSomeThingAsyncd__8.MoveNext() in C:\Source\AsyncTest\AsyncTest\Program.cs:line 106    
22:25:12.725  02172/02756 Error       AsyncTest.Program.DoSomeThingAsync Got argument exception: System.ArgumentException: Even argument 2  

Server stack trace:     
   at AsyncTest.Program.c__DisplayClassf.Calculateb__e() in C:\Source\AsyncTest\AsyncTest\Program.cs:line 124   
   at System.Threading.Tasks.Task`1.InvokeFuture(Object futureAsObj)    
   at System.Threading.Tasks.Task.InnerInvoke()     
   at System.Threading.Tasks.Task.Execute()     

Exception rethrown at [0]:      
   at System.Runtime.CompilerServices.TaskAwaiter.EndAwait()    
   at System.Runtime.CompilerServices.TaskAwaiter`1.EndAwait()  
   at AsyncTest.Program.DoSomeThingAsyncd__8.MoveNext() in C:\Source\AsyncTest\AsyncTest\Program.cs:line 0      
22:25:12.726  02172/05220          } AsyncTest.Program.DoSomeThingAsync Duration 70ms   
22:25:12.726  02172/02756          } AsyncTest.Program.DoSomeThingAsync Duration 64ms   
22:25:12.726  02172/05220 {          AsyncTest.Program.Calculate    
22:25:12.726  02172/05220          } AsyncTest.Program.Calculate Duration 0ms   
22:25:12.726  02172/05220 Information AsyncTest.Program.DoSomeThingAsync Got async result: 3    
22:25:12.726  02172/05220          } AsyncTest.Program.DoSomeThingAsync Duration 64ms   

You will notice that the Run method completes on thread 2880 while only one calculation has started on another thread. If you put a try/catch around your await method you can "catch" the exception in the usual way although your code is executed on another thread when the calculation task has finished and your contiuation is executed.

The calculation method traces the thrown exception automatically because I did use the ApiChange.Api.dll from the ApiChange tool. Tracing and Reflector helps a lot to understand what is going on. To get rid of threading you can create your own versions of GetAwaiter BeginAwait and EndAwait and wrap not a task but e.g. a Lazy and trace inside your own extension methods. Then you will get much better understanding what the compiler and what the TPL does.

Now you see that there is no way to get in a try/catch your exception back since there is no stack frame left for any exception to propagate from. Your code might be doing something totally different after you did initiate the async operations. It might call Thread.Sleep or even terminate. As long as there is one foreground thread left your application will happily continue to execute asynchronous tasks.


You can handle the exception inside the async method after your asynchronous operation did finish and call back into the UI thread. The recommended way to do this is with TaskScheduler.FromSynchronizationContext. That does only work if you have an UI thread and it is not very busy with other things.

Yours, Alois Kraus

share|improve this answer
add comment

The reason the exception is not caught is because the Foo() method has a void return type and so when await is called, it simply returns. As DoFoo() is not awaiting the completion of Foo, the exception handler cannot be used.

This opens up a simpler solution if you can change the method signatures - alter Foo() so that it returns type Task and then DoFoo() can await Foo(), as in this code:

public async Task Foo() {
    var x = await DoSomethingThatThrows();
}

public async void DoFoo() {
    try {
        await Foo();
    } catch (ProtocolException ex) {
        // This will catch exceptions from DoSomethingThatThrows
    }
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

The exception can be caught in the async function.

public async void Foo()
{
    try
    {
        var x = await DoSomethingAsync();
        /* Handle the result, but sometimes an exception might be thrown
           For example, DoSomethingAsync get's data from the network
           and the data is invalid... a ProtocolException might be thrown */
    }
    catch (ProtocolException ex)
    {
          /* The exception will be caught here */
    }
}

public void DoFoo()
{
    Foo();
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Hey, I know but I really need that information in DoFoo so I can display the information in the UI. In this case it's important for the UI to display the exception as it is not an end user tool but a tool to debug a communication protocol –  TimothyP Mar 21 '11 at 21:01
    
In that case, callbacks make a lot of sense.(good old async delegates) –  Sanjeevakumar Hiremath Mar 21 '11 at 21:03
    
@Tim: Include whatever information you need in the thrown exception? –  Eric J. Mar 21 '11 at 22:16
add comment

Its also important to note that you will lose the chronological stack trace of the exception if you you have a void return type on an async method. I would recommend returning Task as follows. Going to make debugging a whole lot easier.

public async Task DoFoo()
    {
        try
        {
            return await Foo();
        }
        catch (ProtocolException ex)
        {
            /* Exception with chronological stack trace */     
        }
    }
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.