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I just created a custom finding function for strings in a map. I developed some kind of the linear search algorithm (which I found out later) and was not satisfied with the speed of the function. So I searched for a faster function and found map's own function: map::find.

This was incredibly faster than the linear algorithm I was using.

In another example STL's function find was also much faster than another linear function I am using.

But how is this possible? If you use the binary search algorithm you need to sort the map first which would take (hypothetically) more time the bigger your map is.

Also how to find out the algorithms behind those core functions? Is there a list or some kind of database to find this out?

Thanks for all your answers! I upvoted the best answers and accepted Max Lybbert's answer because it was the most detailed one.

Paul :)

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I found these intro videos on channel9 to be really useful as well when starting out with STL –  MarkB42 Mar 21 '11 at 20:56
    
Not worth an answer, but gcc's find uses a regular while loop for input iterators (i.e. istream) and forward/bidirectional iterators (i.e. list). For random access iterators (i.e. vector), it uses a for loop, but it checks four elements at a time. Visual Studio's implementation is just a regular for loop checking one element at a time, but it's specialized for searching strings. –  dauphic Mar 21 '11 at 22:28
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5 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I developed some kind of the linear search algorithm (which I found out later) and was not satisfied with the speed of the function. So I searched for a faster function and found map's own function: map::find.

This was incredibly faster than the linear algorithm I was using.

std::map is designed to keep data sorted as it's inserted into the container. That's one of it's main jobs. It's also the reason you must define some sort of partial ordering for the data you put into a std::map.

This means each insertion takes a little longer than inserting into other containers (inserting into a std::list, once you have the insertion point, for instance is O(1), as is appending to a std::vector or appending/prepending to a std::deque). But look up is guaranteed to use binary search (or, rather, to navigate the red-black tree behind the std::map (under "Premature or Prudent Optimization")).

In another example STL's function find was also much faster than another linear function I am using.

But how is this possible? If you use the binary search algorithm you need to sort the map first which would take (hypothetically) more time the bigger your map is.

There's nothing hypothetical about it. Sorting your data takes time, and always takes more time the more items of data.

std::find is able to handle unsorted data, so it must be implemented as a linear search (compare std::binary_search). But std::find is allowed to be sneaky and unroll loops, compare more than one item at a time (if the items are small, and especially if they are primitive types that lend themselves to low-level bit fiddling), etc. I believe that std::find is allowed to use multiple threads for the comparisons, but I'm not aware of any STL implementation that does so.

Also how to find out the algorithms behind those core functions? Is there a list or some kind of database to find this out?

Personally, I learned a lot of algorithms by reading what was available in the STL and a few other languages. I found it easier to study the containers first..

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std::map stores its elements in sorted order (almost always in a self-balancing binary search tree).

std::map::find takes advantage of this and uses a dichotomic search.

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In what way? Depending on the index (map[index])? –  Paul Engstler Mar 21 '11 at 20:47
    
@Paul This is a good place to start: secure.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/wiki/Red-black_tree Most implementations will use something smarter then a simple RB tree. –  Let_Me_Be Mar 21 '11 at 20:49
    
yes, sorted by the key value –  Inverse Mar 21 '11 at 20:49
    
@Let_Me_Be: It would be better to learn about simple BSTs (binary search trees) before the more advanced red-black tree. –  Emile Cormier Mar 21 '11 at 21:38
    
Is there a difference between a binary search of a sorted array and search of a binary tree? My understanding is that a binary search was restricted (best performed) on contiguous, random access, data structures. A binary tree is not contiguous nor provides random access; but it is designed for optimized searching by key. Am I pedantic? –  Thomas Matthews Mar 22 '11 at 0:33
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Technically, there are no such algorithms. The standard defines how well should every algorithm perform, not how it should do it. Each compiler ships an implementation of the standard library.

That being say, there are free implementations of the STL. You could look at their code. For example, STL Port.

Also how to find out the algorithms behind those core functions? Is there a list or some kind of database to find this out?

Well, there is the Dictionary of Algorithms and Data Structures but it's a bit messy.

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Thanks for answering that part. I hope the code is not too much above my level to understand it. ;) –  Paul Engstler Mar 21 '11 at 20:55
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The implementation is well, implementation dependent.

But as far as the generic complexity classes go, you can check for example this page with an overview for the common STL methods:

http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/stl/

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The STL algorithms are almost always faster than anything you could write yourself because it makes a lot of optimizations under the covers. It's also faster to use iterators than operator[] when iterating through a vector or other random access container because there's less overhead.

You should checkout Scott Meyers' books Effective C++ Third Edition and Effective STL. (The material in More Effective C++ is contained within the 3rd Edition of Effective C++.)

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I would be very surprised to find iterator access to a vector to be any different than using operator[]. There should be minimal overhead in either case. A quick test with gcc 4.2.1 shows this to be the case. –  KeithB Mar 21 '11 at 21:38
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The performance difference between vector iterators and operator[] is almost negligeable. –  Emile Cormier Mar 21 '11 at 21:49
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