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Java has a convenient split method:

String str = "The quick brown fox";
String[] results = str.split(" ");

Is there an easy way to do this in C++?

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16  
How about the following: codeproject.com/KB/recipes/Tokenizer.aspx –  Matthieu N. Mar 20 '10 at 4:37
    
I had the same question and surprised this wasn't asked a looong time ago. –  cyberSecurity Sep 16 '10 at 19:03
56  
I can't believe this routine task is such a headache in c++ –  wbarksdale Sep 8 '11 at 5:05
1  
Its not headache in c++ - there are various ways to achieve it. programmers are less aware of c++ than c# - its about marketing and investments... see this for various c++ options to achieve the same: cplusplus.com/faq/sequences/strings/split –  hB0 Oct 31 '13 at 0:10
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29 Answers 29

up vote 94 down vote accepted

Your simple case can easily be built using the std::string::find method. However, take a look at Boost.Tokenizer. It's great. Boost generally has some very cool string tools.

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3  
Sadly, boost is not always available for all projects. I'll have to look for a non-boost answer. –  FuzzyBunnySlippers Dec 20 '13 at 21:00
2  
@NonlinearIdeas Change that. Boost should be available. Not providing it is an unreasonable restriction. –  Konrad Rudolph Dec 20 '13 at 21:07
1  
Not every project is open to "open source". I work in heavily regulated industries. It's not a problem, really. It's just a fact of life. Boost is not available everywhere. –  FuzzyBunnySlippers Dec 20 '13 at 23:19
    
@NonlinearIdeas The other question / answer wasn’t about Open Source projects at all. The same is true for any project. That said, I of course understand about restricted standards such as MISRA C but then it’s understood that you build everything from scratch anyway (unless you happen to find a compliant library – a rarity). Anyway, the point is hardly that “Boost is not available” – it’s that you have special requirements for which almost any general-purpose answer would be unsuitable. –  Konrad Rudolph Dec 21 '13 at 10:46
1  
This discussion sparked me to ask about my specific industry of concern: stackoverflow.com/questions/20714009/…. –  FuzzyBunnySlippers Dec 21 '13 at 12:02
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The Boost tokenizer class can make this sort of thing quite simple:

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <boost/foreach.hpp>
#include <boost/tokenizer.hpp>

using namespace std;
using namespace boost;

int main(int, char**)
{
    string text = "token, test   string";

    char_separator<char> sep(", ");
    tokenizer< char_separator<char> > tokens(text, sep);
    BOOST_FOREACH (const string& t, tokens) {
        cout << t << "." << endl;
    }
}

Updated for C++11:

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <boost/tokenizer.hpp>

using namespace std;
using namespace boost;

int main(int, char**)
{
    string text = "token, test   string";

    char_separator<char> sep(", ");
    tokenizer<char_separator<char>> tokens(text, sep);
    for (const auto& t : tokens) {
        cout << t << "." << endl;
    }
}
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1  
Good stuff, I've recently utilized this. My Visual Studio compiler has an odd whinge until I use a whitespace to separate the two ">" characters before the tokens(text, sep) bit: (error C2947: expecting '>' to terminate template-argument-list, found '>>') –  AndyUK Oct 1 '10 at 15:57
    
@AndyUK yes, without the space the compiler parses it as an extraction operator rather than two closing templates. –  EnabrenTane Jun 14 '11 at 3:23
    
Theoretically that's been fixed in C++0x –  David Souther Sep 1 '11 at 2:09
1  
beware of the third parameters of the char_separator constructor (drop_empty_tokens is the default, alternative is keep_empty_tokens). –  Benoit Feb 17 '12 at 10:56
3  
@puk - It's a commonly used suffix for C++ header files. (like .h for C headers) –  Ferruccio Dec 12 '13 at 22:44
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Use strtok. In my opinion, there isn't a need to build a class around tokenizing unless strtok doesn't provide you with what you need. It might not, but in 15+ years of writing various parsing code in C and C++, I've always used strtok. Here is an example

char myString[] = "The quick brown fox";
char *p = strtok(myString, " ");
while (p) {
    printf ("Token: %s\n", p);
    p = strtok(NULL, " ");
}

A few caveats (which might not suit your needs). The string is "destroyed" in the process, meaning that EOS characters are placed inline in the delimter spots. Correct usage might require you to make a non-const version of the string. You can also change the list of delimiters mid parse.

In my own opinion, the above code is far simpler and easier to use than writing a separate class for it. To me, this is one of those functions that the language provides and it does it well and cleanly. It's simply a "C based" solution. It's appropriate, it's easy, and you don't have to write a lot of extra code :-)

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16  
Not that I dislike C, however strtok is not thread-safe, and you need to be certain that the string you send it contains a null character to avoid a possible buffer overflow. –  tloach May 10 '10 at 13:18
6  
There is strtok_r, but this was a C++ question. –  Prof. Falken Oct 6 '10 at 9:14
2  
@tloach: in MS C++ compiler strtok is thread safe as the internal static variable is created on the TLS (thread local storage) (actually it is compiler depended) –  Ahmed Said Nov 28 '10 at 15:03
    
you can check this nibuthomas.wordpress.com/2008/06/25/… –  Ahmed Said Nov 28 '10 at 15:03
1  
@ahmed: thread safe means more than just being able to run the function twice in different threads. In this case if the thread is modified while strtok is running it's possible to have the string be valid during the entire run of strtok, but strtok will still mess up because the string changed, it's now already past the null character, and it's going to keep reading memory until it either gets a security violation or finds a null character. This is a problem with the original C string functions, if you don't specify a length somewhere you run into problems. –  tloach Nov 29 '10 at 13:23
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You can use streams, iterators, and the copy algorithm to do this fairly directly.

#include <string>
#include <vector>
#include <iostream>
#include <istream>
#include <ostream>
#include <iterator>
#include <sstream>
#include <algorithm>

int main()
{
  std::string str = "The quick brown fox";

  // construct a stream from the string
  std::stringstream strstr(str);

  // use stream iterators to copy the stream to the vector as whitespace separated strings
  std::istream_iterator<std::string> it(strstr);
  std::istream_iterator<std::string> end;
  std::vector<std::string> results(it, end);

  // send the vector to stdout.
  std::ostream_iterator<std::string> oit(std::cout);
  std::copy(results.begin(), results.end(), oit);
}
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13  
I find those std:: irritating to read.. why not use "using" ? –  user35978 Nov 28 '08 at 4:19
53  
@Vadi: because editing someone else's post is quite intrusive. @pheze: I prefer to let the std this way I know where my object comes from, that's merely a matter of style. –  Matthieu M. Apr 2 '10 at 8:49
5  
I understand your reason and I think it's actually a good choice if it works for you, but from a pedagogical standpoint I actually agree with pheze. It's easier to read and understand a completely foreign example like this one with a "using namespace std" at the top because it requires less effort to interpret the following lines... especially in this case because everything is from the standard library. You can make it easy to read and obvious where the objects come from by a series of "using std::string;" etc. Especially since the function is so short. –  cheshirekow Jul 16 '10 at 11:27
23  
Despite the "std::" prefixes being irritating or ugly, it's best to include them in example code so that it's completely clear where these functions are coming from. If they bother you, it's trivial to replace them with a "using" after you steal the example and claim it as your own. –  dlchambers Apr 11 '12 at 14:54
8  
yep! what he said! best practices is to use the std prefix. Any large code base is no doubt going to have it's own libraries and namespaces and using "using namespace std" will give you headaches when you start causing namespace conflicts. –  Miek Jul 18 '12 at 17:08
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Another quick way is to use getline. Something like:

stringstream ss("bla bla");
string s;

while (getline(ss, s, ' ')) {
 cout << s << endl;
}

If you want, you can make a simple split() method returning a vector<string>, which is really useful.

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2  
I had problems using this technique with 0x0A characters in the string which made the while loop exit prematurely. Otherwise, it's a nice simple and quick solution. –  HZC Jan 24 '11 at 23:00
    
Loved your solution!!! –  F Yaqoob Nov 22 '11 at 16:35
2  
This is good but just have to keep in mind that by doing this the default delimiter '\n' is not considered. This example will work, but if you are using something like : while(getline(inFile,word,' ')) where inFile is ifstream object containing multiple lines you will get funnny results.. –  hackrock Jun 19 '12 at 21:28
    
it's too bad getline returns the stream rather than the string, making it unusable in initialization lists without temporary storage –  fuzzyTew Aug 3 '13 at 12:34
    
Cool! No boost and C++11, good solution to the those legacy projects out there! –  Deqing Apr 30 at 7:09
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No offense folks, but for such a simple problem, you are making things way too complicated. There are a lot of reasons to use Boost. But for something this simple, it's like hitting a fly with a 20# sledge.

void
split( vector<string> & theStringVector,  /* Altered/returned value */
       const  string  & theString,
       const  string  & theDelimiter)
{
    UASSERT( theDelimiter.size(), >, 0); // My own ASSERT macro.

    size_t  start = 0, end = 0;

    while ( end != string::npos)
    {
        end = theString.find( theDelimiter, start);

        // If at end, use length=maxLength.  Else use length=end-start.
        theStringVector.push_back( theString.substr( start,
                       (end == string::npos) ? string::npos : end - start));

        // If at end, use start=maxSize.  Else use start=end+delimiter.
        start = (   ( end > (string::npos - theDelimiter.size()) )
                  ?  string::npos  :  end + theDelimiter.size());
    }
}

For example (for Doug's case),

#define SHOW(I,X)   cout << "[" << (I) << "]\t " # X " = \"" << (X) << "\"" << endl

int
main()
{
    vector<string> v;

    split( v, "A:PEP:909:Inventory Item", ":" );

    for (unsigned int i = 0;  i < v.size();   i++)
        SHOW( i, v[i] );
}

And yes, we could have split() return a new vector rather than passing one in. It's trivial to wrap and overload. But depending on what I'm doing, I often find it better to re-use pre-existing objects rather than always creating new ones. (Just as long as I don't forget to empty the vector in between!)

Reference: http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/string/string/.

(I was originally writing a response to Doug's question: C++ Strings Modifying and Extracting based on Separators (closed). But since Martin York closed that question with a pointer over here... I'll just generalize my code.)

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2  
+1: simplicity is a beautiful thing :) –  rubenvb Oct 29 '10 at 21:25
    
Thanks........... –  Mr.Ree Oct 30 '10 at 0:14
9  
Why define a macro you only use in one place. And how is your UASSERT any better than standard assert. Splitting up the comparison into 3 tokens like that does nothing other than require more commas than you'd otherwise need. –  crelbor May 13 '11 at 13:10
    
Maybe the UASSERT macro shows (in the error message) the actual relationship between (and values of) the two compared values? That's actually a pretty good idea, IMHO. –  Kronikarz Mar 17 '12 at 17:03
3  
Ugh, why doesn't the std::string class include a split() function? –  Mr. Shickadance Apr 18 '12 at 20:34
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Boost has a strong split function: boost::algorithm::split.

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Here's a real simple one:

#include <vector>
#include <string>
using namespace std;

vector<string> split(const char *str, char c = ' ')
{
    vector<string> result;

    do
    {
        const char *begin = str;

        while(*str != c && *str)
            str++;

        result.push_back(string(begin, str));
    } while (0 != *str++);

    return result;
}
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do I need to add a prototype for this method in .h file ? –  Suhrob Samiev Dec 22 '11 at 8:26
    
i added this vector<string> split(const char *str, char c = ' ') but gives me errors ! –  Suhrob Samiev Dec 22 '11 at 8:27
8  
This is the best answer here. It doesn't use string::find or find_first_of or getline or streams or Boost or regex or strtok. It just answers the question and doesn't f*** around. It could fit in 8 lines without any trouble and could easily be adapted to take a std::string instead of a char array, and even multiple delimiter characters. It could be parameterized for different return types, as the container only needs to support push_back. –  Oktalist Dec 19 '12 at 22:29
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I know you asked for a C++ solution, but you might consider this helpful:

Qt

#include <QString>

...

QString str = "The quick brown fox"; 
QStringList results = str.split(" "); 

The advantage over Boost in this example is that it's a direct one to one mapping to your post's code.

See more at Qt documentation

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Here is a sample tokenizer class that might do what you want

//Header file
class Tokenizer 
{
    public:
        static const std::string DELIMITERS;
        Tokenizer(const std::string& str);
        Tokenizer(const std::string& str, const std::string& delimiters);
        bool NextToken();
        bool NextToken(const std::string& delimiters);
        const std::string GetToken() const;
        void Reset();
    protected:
        size_t m_offset;
        const std::string m_string;
        std::string m_token;
        std::string m_delimiters;
}

//CPP file
const string Tokenizer::DELIMITERS(" \t\n\r");

Tokenizer::Tokenizer(const std::string& s) :
    m_string(s), 
    m_offset(0), 
    m_delimiters(DELIMITERS) {}

Tokenizer::Tokenizer(const std::string& s, const std::string& delimiters) :
    m_string(s), 
    m_offset(0), 
    m_delimiters(delimiters) {}

bool Tokenizer::NextToken() 
{
    return NextToken(m_delimiters);
}

bool Tokenizer::NextToken(const std::string& delimiters) 
{
    size_t i = m_string.find_first_not_of(delimiters, m_offset);
    if (string::npos == i) 
    {
        m_offset = m_string.length();
        return false;
    }

    size_t j = m_string.find_first_of(delimiters, i);
    if (string::npos == j) 
    {
        m_token = m_string.substr(i);
        m_offset = m_string.length();
        return true;
    }

    m_token = m_string.substr(i, j - i);
    m_offset = j;
    return true;
}

Example:

std::vector <std::string> v;
Tokenizer s("split this string", " ");
while (s.NextToken())
{
	v.push_back(s.GetToken());
}
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pystring is a small library which implements a bunch of Python's string functions, including the split method:

#include <string>
#include <vector>
#include "pystring.h"

std::vector<std::string> chunks;
pystring::split("this string", chunks);

// also can specify a separator
pystring::split("this-string", chunks, "-");
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1  
Wow, you have answered my immediate question and many future questions. I get that c++ is powerful. But when splitting a string results in source code like the above answers, it is plainly disheartening. I would love to know of other libraries like this that pull higher level langauges conveniences down. –  Ross Jun 14 '12 at 22:55
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Check this example. It might help you..

#include <iostream>
#include <sstream>

using namespace std;

int main ()
{
    string tmps;
    istringstream is ("the dellimiter is the space");
    while (is.good ()) {
        is >> tmps;
        cout << tmps << "\n";
    }
    return 0;
}
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I posted this answer for similar question.
Don't reinvent the wheel. I've used a number of libraries and the fastest and most flexible I have come across is: C++ String Toolkit Library.

Here is an example of how to use it that I've posted else where on the stackoverflow.

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <string>
#include <strtk.hpp>

const char *whitespace  = " \t\r\n\f";
const char *whitespace_and_punctuation  = " \t\r\n\f;,=";

int main()
{
    {   // normal parsing of a string into a vector of strings
       string s("Somewhere down the road");
       std::vector<std::string> result;
       if( strtk::parse( s, whitespace, result ) )
       {
           for(size_t i = 0; i < result.size(); ++i )
            std::cout << result[i] << std::endl;
       }
    }

    {  // parsing a string into a vector of floats with other separators
       // besides spaces

       string t("3.0, 3.14; 4.0");
       std::vector<float> values;
       if( strtk::parse( s, whitespace_and_punctuation, values ) )
       {
           for(size_t i = 0; i < values.size(); ++i )
            std::cout << values[i] << std::endl;
       }
    }

    {  // parsing a string into specific variables

       string u("angle = 45; radius = 9.9");
       string w1, w2;
       float v1, v2;
       if( strtk::parse( s, whitespace_and_punctuation, w1, v1, w2, v2) )
       {
           std::cout << "word " << w1 << ", value " << v1 << std::endl;
           std::cout << "word " << w2 << ", value " << v2 << std::endl;
       }
    }

    return 0;
}
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If you're willing to use C, you can use the strtok function. You should pay attention to multi-threading issues when using it.

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3  
Note that strtok modifes the string you're checking, so you can't use it on const char * strings without making a copy. –  Graeme Perrow Sep 10 '08 at 13:53
6  
The multithreading issue is that strtok uses a global variable to keep track of where it is, so if you have two threads that each use strtok, you'll get undefined behavior. –  JohnMcG Sep 10 '08 at 15:09
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You can simply use a regular expression library and solve that using regular expressions.

Use expression (\w+) and the variable in \1 (or $1 depending on the library implementation of regular expressions).

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Many overly complicated suggestions here. Try this simple std::string solution:

using namespace std;

string someText = ...

string::size_type tokenOff = 0, sepOff = tokenOff;
while (sepOff != string::npos)
{
    sepOff = someText.find(' ', sepOff);
    string::size_type tokenLen = (sepOff == string::npos) ? sepOff : sepOff++ - tokenOff;
    string token = someText.substr(tokenOff, tokenLen);
    if (!token.empty())
        /* do something with token */;
    tokenOff = sepOff;
}
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For simple stuff I just use the following:

unsigned TokenizeString(const std::string& i_source,
    					const std::string& i_seperators,
    					bool i_discard_empty_tokens,
    					std::vector<std::string>& o_tokens)
{
    unsigned prev_pos = 0;
    unsigned pos = 0;
    unsigned number_of_tokens = 0;
    o_tokens.clear();
    pos = i_source.find_first_of(i_seperators, pos);
    while (pos != std::string::npos)
    {
    	std::string token = i_source.substr(prev_pos, pos - prev_pos);
    	if (!i_discard_empty_tokens || token != "")
    	{
    		o_tokens.push_back(i_source.substr(prev_pos, pos - prev_pos));
    		number_of_tokens++;
    	}

    	pos++;
    	prev_pos = pos;
    	pos = i_source.find_first_of(i_seperators, pos);
    }

    if (prev_pos < i_source.length())
    {
    	o_tokens.push_back(i_source.substr(prev_pos));
    	number_of_tokens++;
    }

    return number_of_tokens;
}

Cowardly disclaimer: I write real-time data processing software where the data comes in through binary files, sockets, or some API call (I/O cards, camera's). I never use this function for something more complicated or time-critical than reading external configuration files on startup.

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I thought that was what the >> operator on string streams was for:

string word; sin >> word;
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1  
My fault for giving a bad (too simple) example. A far as I know, that only works when your delimiter is whitespace. –  Bill the Lizard Nov 25 '08 at 18:24
    
Now that I've gotten around to using it, the syntax is sin >> word; –  Bill the Lizard Dec 8 '08 at 15:17
    
>> can be used only if the delimiter is a space or tab. –  Tran Son Hai Jun 20 '13 at 3:57
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MFC/ATL has a very nice tokenizer. From MSDN:

CAtlString str( "%First Second#Third" );
CAtlString resToken;
int curPos= 0;

resToken= str.Tokenize("% #",curPos);
while (resToken != "")
{
   printf("Resulting token: %s\n", resToken);
   resToken= str.Tokenize("% #",curPos);
};

Output

Resulting Token: First
Resulting Token: Second
Resulting Token: Third
share|improve this answer
    
This Tokenize() function will skip empty tokens, for example, if there is substring "%%" in main string, there is no empty token returned. It is skipped. –  Sheen Jan 20 '11 at 16:49
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Here's an approach that allows you control over whether empty tokens are included (like strsep) or excluded (like strtok).

#include <string.h> // for strchr and strlen

/*
 * want_empty_tokens==true  : include empty tokens, like strsep()
 * want_empty_tokens==false : exclude empty tokens, like strtok()
 */
std::vector<std::string> tokenize(const char* src,
                                  char delim,
                                  bool want_empty_tokens)
{
  std::vector<std::string> tokens;

  if (src and *src != '\0') // defensive
    while( true )  {
      const char* d = strchr(src, delim);
      size_t len = (d)? d-src : strlen(src);

      if (len or want_empty_tokens)
        tokens.push_back( std::string(src, len) ); // capture token

      if (d) src += len+1; else break;
    }

  return tokens;
}
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There is no direct way to do this. Refer this code project source code to find out how to build a class for this.

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If the maximum length of the input string to be tokenized is known, one can exploit this and implement a very fast version. I am sketching the basic idea below, which was inspired by both strtok() and the "suffix array"-data structure described Jon Bentley's "Programming Perls" 2nd edition, chapter 15. The C++ class in this case only gives some organization and convenience of use. The implementation shown can be easily extended for removing leading and trailing whitespace characters in the tokens.

Basically one can replace the separator characters with string-terminating '\0'-characters and set pointers to the tokens withing the modified string. In the extreme case when the string consists only of separators, one gets string-length plus 1 resulting empty tokens. It is practical to duplicate the string to be modified.

Header file:

class TextLineSplitter
{
public:

    TextLineSplitter( const size_t max_line_len );

    ~TextLineSplitter();

    void            SplitLine( const char *line,
                               const char sep_char = ',',
                             );

    inline size_t   NumTokens( void ) const
    {
        return mNumTokens;
    }

    const char *    GetToken( const size_t token_idx ) const
    {
        assert( token_idx < mNumTokens );
        return mTokens[ token_idx ];
    }

private:
    const size_t    mStorageSize;

    char           *mBuff;
    char          **mTokens;
    size_t          mNumTokens;

    inline void     ResetContent( void )
    {
        memset( mBuff, 0, mStorageSize );
        // mark all items as empty:
        memset( mTokens, 0, mStorageSize * sizeof( char* ) );
        // reset counter for found items:
        mNumTokens = 0L;
    }
};

Implementattion file:

TextLineSplitter::TextLineSplitter( const size_t max_line_len ):
    mStorageSize ( max_line_len + 1L )
{
    // allocate memory
    mBuff   = new char  [ mStorageSize ];
    mTokens = new char* [ mStorageSize ];

    ResetContent();
}

TextLineSplitter::~TextLineSplitter()
{
    delete [] mBuff;
    delete [] mTokens;
}


void TextLineSplitter::SplitLine( const char *line,
                                  const char sep_char   /* = ',' */,
                                )
{
    assert( sep_char != '\0' );

    ResetContent();
    strncpy( mBuff, line, mMaxLineLen );

    size_t idx       = 0L; // running index for characters

    do
    {
        assert( idx < mStorageSize );

        const char chr = line[ idx ]; // retrieve current character

        if( mTokens[ mNumTokens ] == NULL )
        {
            mTokens[ mNumTokens ] = &mBuff[ idx ];
        } // if

        if( chr == sep_char || chr == '\0' )
        { // item or line finished
            // overwrite separator with a 0-terminating character:
            mBuff[ idx ] = '\0';
            // count-up items:
            mNumTokens ++;
        } // if

    } while( line[ idx++ ] );
}

A scenario of usage would be:

// create an instance capable of splitting strings up to 1000 chars long:
TextLineSplitter spl( 1000 );
spl.SplitLine( "Item1,,Item2,Item3" );
for( size_t i = 0; i < spl.NumTokens(); i++ )
{
    printf( "%s\n", spl.GetToken( i ) );
}

output:

Item1

Item2
Item3
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you can take advantage of boost::make_find_iterator. Something similar to this:

template<typename CH>
inline vector< basic_string<CH> > tokenize(
    const basic_string<CH> &Input,
    const basic_string<CH> &Delimiter,
    bool remove_empty_token
    ) {

    typedef typename basic_string<CH>::const_iterator string_iterator_t;
    typedef boost::find_iterator< string_iterator_t > string_find_iterator_t;

    vector< basic_string<CH> > Result;
    string_iterator_t it = Input.begin();
    string_iterator_t it_end = Input.end();
    for(string_find_iterator_t i = boost::make_find_iterator(Input, boost::first_finder(Delimiter, boost::is_equal()));
        i != string_find_iterator_t();
        ++i) {
        if(remove_empty_token){
            if(it != i->begin())
                Result.push_back(basic_string<CH>(it,i->begin()));
        }
        else
            Result.push_back(basic_string<CH>(it,i->begin()));
        it = i->end();
    }
    if(it != it_end)
        Result.push_back(basic_string<CH>(it,it_end));

    return Result;
}
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boost::tokenizer is your friend, but consider making your code portable with reference to internationalization (i18n) issues by using wstring/wchar_t instead of the legacy string/char types.

#include <iostream>
#include <boost/tokenizer.hpp>
#include <string>

using namespace std;
using namespace boost;

typedef tokenizer<char_separator<wchar_t>,
                  wstring::const_iterator, wstring> Tok;

int main()
{
  wstring s;
  while (getline(wcin, s)) {
    char_separator<wchar_t> sep(L" "); // list of separator characters
    Tok tok(s, sep);
    for (Tok::iterator beg = tok.begin(); beg != tok.end(); ++beg) {
      wcout << *beg << L"\t"; // output (or store in vector)
    }
    wcout << L"\n";
  }
  return 0;
}
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"legacy" is definitely not correct and wchar_t is a horrible implementation dependent type that nobody should use unless absolutely necessary. –  CoffeeandCode May 21 at 0:09
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Simple C++ code (standard C++98), accepts multiple delimiters (specified in a std::string), uses only vectors, strings and iterators.

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <string>
#include <stdexcept> 

std::vector<std::string> 
split(const std::string& str, const std::string& delim){
    std::vector<std::string> result;
    if (str.empty())
        throw std::runtime_error("Can not tokenize an empty string!");
    std::string::const_iterator begin, str_it;
    begin = str_it = str.begin(); 
    do {
        while (delim.find(*str_it) == std::string::npos && str_it != str.end())
            str_it++; // find the position of the first delimiter in str
        std::string token = std::string(begin, str_it); // grab the token
        if (!token.empty()) // empty token only when str starts with a delimiter
            result.push_back(token); // push the token into a vector<string>
        while (delim.find(*str_it) != std::string::npos && str_it != str.end())
            str_it++; // ignore the additional consecutive delimiters
        begin = str_it; // process the remaining tokens
        } while (str_it != str.end());
    return result;
}

int main() {
    std::string test_string = ".this is.a.../.simple;;test;;;END";
    std::string delim = "; ./"; // string containing the delimiters
    std::vector<std::string> tokens = split(test_string, delim);           
    for (std::vector<std::string>::const_iterator it = tokens.begin(); 
        it != tokens.end(); it++)
            std::cout << *it << std::endl;
}
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/// split a string into multiple sub strings, based on a separator string
/// for example, if separator="::",
///
/// s = "abc" -> "abc"
///
/// s = "abc::def xy::st:" -> "abc", "def xy" and "st:",
///
/// s = "::abc::" -> "abc"
///
/// s = "::" -> NO sub strings found
///
/// s = "" -> NO sub strings found
///
/// then append the sub-strings to the end of the vector v.
/// 
/// the idea comes from the findUrls() function of "Accelerated C++", chapt7,
/// findurls.cpp
///
void split(const string& s, const string& sep, vector<string>& v)
{
    typedef string::const_iterator iter;
    iter b = s.begin(), e = s.end(), i;
    iter sep_b = sep.begin(), sep_e = sep.end();

    // search through s
    while (b != e){
        i = search(b, e, sep_b, sep_e);

        // no more separator found
        if (i == e){
            // it's not an empty string
            if (b != e)
                v.push_back(string(b, e));
            break;
        }
        else if (i == b){
            // the separator is found and right at the beginning
            // in this case, we need to move on and search for the
            // next separator
            b = i + sep.length();
        }
        else{
            // found the separator
            v.push_back(string(b, i));
            b = i;
        }
    }
}

The boost library is good, but they are not always available. Doing this sort of things by hand is also a good brain exercise. Here we just use the std::search() algorithm from the STL, see the above code.

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I've been searching for a way to split a string by a separator of any length, so I started writing it from scratch, as existing solutions didn't suit me.

Here is my little algorithm, using only STL:

//use like this
//std::vector<std::wstring> vec = Split<std::wstring> (L"Hello##world##!", L"##");

template <typename valueType>
static std::vector <valueType> Split (valueType text, const valueType& delimiter)
{
    std::vector <valueType> tokens;
    size_t pos = 0;
    valueType token;

    while ((pos = text.find(delimiter)) != valueType::npos) 
    {
        token = text.substr(0, pos);
        tokens.push_back (token);
        text.erase(0, pos + delimiter.length());
    }
    tokens.push_back (text);

    return tokens;
}

It can be used with separator of any length and form, as far as I've tested. Instantiate with either string or wstring type.

All the algorithm does is it searches for the delimiter, gets the part of the string that is up to the delimiter, deletes the delimiter and searches again until it finds it no more.

Hope it helps.

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This a simple loop to tokenise with only standard library files

#include <iostream.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <math.h>
#include <conio.h>
class word
    {
     public:
     char w[20];
     word()
      {
        for(int j=0;j<=20;j++)
        {w[j]='\0';
      }
   }



};

void main()
  {
    int i=1,n=0,j=0,k=0,m=1;
    char input[100];
    word ww[100];
    gets(input);

    n=strlen(input);


    for(i=0;i<=m;i++)
      {
        if(context[i]!=' ')
         {
            ww[k].w[j]=context[i];
            j++;

         }
         else
        {
         k++;
         j=0;
         m++;
        }

   }
 }
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A simple Visual C++ version using System::String

array<String^>^ Tokenizer(System::String^ str, System::String^ chr){
    array<String^>^ result = gcnew array<String^>(1);
    System::String^ strtmp=str;
    System::Int32 pos;
    while((pos=strtmp->IndexOf(chr))!=-1){      
        result[result->Length-1]=strtmp->Substring(0,pos);
        strtmp=strtmp->Substring(pos+1); 
        System::Array::Resize(result, result->Length+1);
    }
    result[result->Length-1]=strtmp;
    return result;
}
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