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It seems like when I calculate int i = -1 % 2 I get -1 in Java. In Python I get 1. What do I have to do to get the same behavior in Java?

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17  
No. Math teaches us an idea of modulo to group all numbers into equivalence classes so that for a modulo n all numbers a are identified with some number in range 0..n (n is positive). This is what we usually need in programming for wrapping array indeces. ** (uncensored) the division. We do not need any division. We need to work with circular buffers. Producing negative result for negative a contradicts this idea. Everybody needs index to stay in the range 0..array'length. So, there is a bug in math and Java but not in Python. That is why you want to fix it. –  Val Jan 31 '13 at 13:36
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Wait, this is actually a duplicate question. It also has a perfect answer stackoverflow.com/a/4412200/1083704 –  Val Jan 31 '13 at 13:41
    
@Val you mentioned modulo n equivalence classes: this range {0,1,2..n-1} is good for programmers, but {-n,n+1,n+2,-1} is equivalent and has the same right to exist –  Tim Jan 8 '14 at 20:44

4 Answers 4

up vote 59 down vote accepted

The problem here is that in Python the % operator returns the modulus and in Java it returns the remainder. These functions give the same values for positive arguments, but the modulus always returns positive results for negative input, whereas the remainder may give negative results. There's some more information about it in this question.

You can find the positive value by doing this:

int i = (((-1 % 2) + 2) % 2)

or this:

int i = -1 % 2;
if (i<0) i += 2;

(obviously -1 or 2 can be whatever you want the numerator or denominator to be)

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2  
@amit_gr - no I believe it works in general –  andrewmu Mar 21 '11 at 23:56
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you are right - my mistake. +1 –  amit Mar 21 '11 at 23:59
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@Cachapa please provide an example to support that statement. I believe the OP's solution is general already, consider that (((-3 % 4) + 4) % 4) = 1 (the intended result) and also that (((3 % 4) + 4) % 4) = 3 (also the intended result). It works with both positive and negative dividends. –  The111 Jan 5 '13 at 8:54
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@The111 Imagine the range of your integer is [-8, 7], (((5 % 6) + 6) % 6) = ((5 + 6) % 6) = (-5 % 6) = -5, but 5 % 6 is supposed to be positive. Substitute appropriately large numbers for 32 bit ints like 536887296 and 1610612736 and it is clear the second method is the better one. –  Greg Rogers Jan 2 '14 at 20:23
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It isn't the modulus, it's the remainder. Fix your answer. –  Eduardo León May 22 at 2:47

If you need n % m then:

int i = (n < 0) ? (m - (abs(n) % m) ) %m : (n % m);

mathematical explanation:

n = -1 * abs(n)
-> n % m = (-1 * abs(n) ) % m
-> (-1 * (abs(n) % m) ) % m
-> m - (abs(n) % m))
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This expression didn't work for me. For negative values I was getting values between 1:m instead of the expected 0:m-1, as in the case where n is positive. The solution from andrewmu functioned as expected. –  Cachapa Dec 16 '12 at 13:42

Since Java 8 you can use the Math.floorMod() method:

Math.floorMod(-1, 2); //== 1

Note: If the modulo-value (here 2) is negative, all output values will be negative too. :)

Source: http://stackoverflow.com/a/25830153/2311557

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If the modulus is a power of 2 then you can use a bitmask:

int i = -1 & ~-2; // -1 MOD 2 is 1

By comparison the Pascal language provides two operators; REM takes the sign of the numerator (x REM y is x - (x DIV y) * y where x DIV y is TRUNC(x / y)) and MOD requires a positive denominator and returns a positive result.

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