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I have a web page which includes insane amount of minified JS files. The web page works perfectly fine on my local network but throws some JS error on staging. There is an issue in JS and I wan't to debug it. When I load the JS in Firebug's script tag it appears in one long horizontal line. Is there a way out in Firebug that expands or beautifies the script for debugging? I know I can use jsbeautifier but they wont help me. I can not upload an expanded file to CDN, defeats the purpose of using CDN.

Points to be noted,
a) I can not control the box which serves JS, its on CDN, I mentioned it.
b) I can use beautifiers etc but would that help me in debugging the script in run time? IMHO, no
c) Being bound by NDA and other legal things I can not share the script but its a generic problem, you can encounter it with a minified jQuery

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What's your OS/web server? –  Andrey Mar 22 '11 at 4:35
    
what type of minified js ? can u post some initial code of dat –  diEcho Mar 22 '11 at 4:36
    
Have a look at the accepted answer for this question: stackoverflow.com/questions/718795/… –  Alastair Pitts Mar 22 '11 at 4:37
    
@Alastair, I searched on SO but the questions didnt match what I am looking for, I can debug a JS in Firebug, its how do I debug a minified JS in firebug, is there a way out? –  Kumar Mar 22 '11 at 4:43

7 Answers 7

up vote 27 down vote accepted
  1. Beautify your script
  2. Add the CDN host in /etc/hosts or your local DNS to resolve it to your own web server
  3. Host the beautified version and everything that you need on said web server
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Update: There's now a firebug extension that beautifies JavaScript:

https://addons.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/addon/javascript-deminifier/

It's working perfectly for me in Firefox 12.0.

Credit to this answer for spotting it.

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That's really useful. Was hunting some strange problem that only appeared on production, and this really helps pinpointing where things go wrong. Thanks. –  gingerlime Dec 20 '13 at 21:11
    
This is an old answer. My answer below (Load the minified file and press the {} button) now applies to Firefox 31+ –  Kyle Heironimus Nov 7 at 15:35

This is a common problem and the Chrome dev team have recently come up with an elegant solution, which they've called Source Maps - see http://www.html5rocks.com/en/tutorials/developertools/sourcemaps/ for more info, I think you'll find it's exactly what you (and the rest of us) have been crying out for! :)

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I found that 2 months ago, but the question is an year old now. I mostly use Firefox, just out of habit and hence was the question. –  Kumar Apr 17 '12 at 11:53
    
Source Maps sound very useful. –  Matthew Flaschen Feb 27 '13 at 20:40
    
Unfortunately, *.min.js.map files cannot show you mapping between original and renamed variables (arguments). Theoretically, I think, in case of function arguments it could be done, but in practice browsers don't do that. –  dizel3d Oct 31 at 9:24
    
This is an old answer. My answer (Load the minified file and press the {} button) now applies to Firefox 31+ –  Kyle Heironimus Nov 7 at 15:36

Edit: This answer is correct for Firefox 31+ too

I know this question is for Firefox/Firebug, but Chrome handles this quite nicely. Just load the minified file and press the {} button at the bottom and it instantly beautifies, making breakpoints and other debugging possible.

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Oh, Firefox has that too, I didn't notice. –  svick Aug 14 at 16:38

This is more a workaround, but it can help. The idea is that we will replace files coming from the server by files on your machine.
This will work with any browser.
It takes a bit of setup the first time (15 minutes maybe), but then it can be very convenient.
It can also helps testing your bug-fixes in a live/prod environment.

  1. Get Fiddler (it's a web debugging proxy), install it, run it.
    http://www.fiddler2.com/fiddler2/
    (Restart browser after install to get the Fiddler extension)
  2. If you debug an HTTPS website, check this first:
    http://www.fiddler2.com/Fiddler/help/httpsdecryption.asp
  3. From now on, you should see in Fiddler ("Web Sessions" pane on the left) all downloads made by your browser, including JS files.
    If not, check this : Fiddler not displaying sessions
  4. Find the file you want to debug in the list (Ctrl+F works)
  5. Click on the file. Then either:
    • get the file content from the inspectors pane (textView tab), beautify it, save to a file on your local computer
    • or have access to a file which contains the source code (ex: from your source control)
  6. Go to AutoResponder tab (top left pane).
    Select "Enable automatic responses" checkbox.
    Select "Unmatched requests passthrough" checkbox.
  7. Drag your file from left pane to right pane (prefills rule editor at the bottom)
  8. Set the other field with the path of your local file
  9. Click the Save button
  10. Reload the page and enjoy your debugging session.

Fiddler can do many more things, but this use-case answers the initial question.

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It solved my issue to use the Dev code to debug.thanks. –  Mohamed Hussain Sep 22 at 4:36

Pretty-print your JavaScript. Google this and you'll find multiple on-line JS beautifiers.

I happen to use http://jsbeautifier.org/ myself and it works fine, but search for others and use one that suits your needs.

Caveat: You still won't be able to get meaningful local variable names (which are usually renamed by a minifier). If the code was compiled by the Closure Compiler, then you absoutely won't get any useful information back at all, even when beutified, because then all variables and functions and properties are mangled (not only local ones).

Now, if your problem is with debugging code that comes from outside (e.g. a CDN), obviously that code would be minified, and you can't save your beautified version back there. In this case, you can replace the tags that load code from a CDN with a url pointing to your local version, then you can beautify the code (downloaded from the CDN) into your own server and you can then debug with FireBug.

Now, if you don't even control the HTML that contains those tags (e.g. they reside on a outside server), then unfortunately there is no way for you to do what you want without physically downloading the entire site to your own server. Even if you downloaded the entire site (with all the files), it may not work since the site may be driven by a back-end processing language or accesses a back-end database. In such case you'll also need to simulate all those data. It can be done, however -- you just have to go through a lot of pain. My recommendation is to save a version of the web page and run it on your own server, serving beautified code from your own server to debug.

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I guess you didn't understand the issue, I have added clarifications –  Kumar Mar 22 '11 at 4:41
    
See my caveat. You won't be able to reverse engineer a minified piece of JS code without the original source because local variables are usually renamed. The standard jQuery distribution is minified with the Closure Compiler in Simple Mode (not Advanced). It does a very good job in obfuscating everything except public function/property names. –  Stephen Chung Mar 22 '11 at 4:51
    
in my case the script is just minified not obfuscated, white spaces removed thing –  Kumar Mar 22 '11 at 4:52
    
However, you can always "map" the beautified code with the original source (if you have it). Then you can just compare lines one by line to see which line in the minified code corresponds to which line in the original source, and which renamed local variable corresponds to which original variable name. Notice that if the code is processed by the Closure Compiler in Advanced Mode (like most of Google's JS code), then the compiled code will show little resemblance with the original source -- and you'll need to be extremely well-trained in using the Closure Compiler to map them back. –  Stephen Chung Mar 22 '11 at 4:54
    
In this case, check my edited answer. –  Stephen Chung Mar 22 '11 at 4:55

Consider a Change!

Firefox w/ Firebug was my favorite JavaScript debugging method for almost a year, but I've recently moved to Google-Chrome's Developer-Tools which is far more superior.

  • Chrome supports an On-The-Fly (built-in feature) beautification of JavaScript resources enter image description here

  • Once beautified, you are free to debug the JavaScript resource file, as it was "natively" downloaded beautified from the web-server. Breaking-points are set by clicking the line number. enter image description here

  • One of the most extremely powerful feature,
    Is once You've Stopped In A Breaking-point, You Are Free To Execute Commands (using console) In The Same Scope You ARE In The Breaking-point. In Firefox you can't do that. enter image description here Its so easy to debug (even anonymous functions), You'll never be back to Firefox.
    Try It!

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