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I'm having the code as below.

- (void)viewDidLoad
{
 NSArray* myarr = [self createArray];
 for (NSString* str in myarr) 
 {
  NSLog(@"%@",str);
 }
 [myarr release];
}

-(NSArray*)createArray
{
 NSArray* arr1 = [[NSArray alloc] initWithObjects:@"APPLE",@"MAC",@"IPHONE",nil];
 return arr1;
}

When I "Build & Analyze", its showing two leaks. One at [myarr release] saying, incorrect decrement of the reference count of an object that is owned at this point. and Other at return arr1, saying, Potential leak of an object allocated on line 152 and stored into arr1.

From my above code, the method "createArray" is returning a pointer and I'm releasing it as well. Is my way of coding right or wrong?

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up vote 1 down vote accepted

From my above code, the method "createArray" is returning a pointer and I'm releasing it as well. Is my way of coding right or wrong?

that depends on how you look at it.

1) the ref counting looks ok

2) the static analyzer flags objc methods based on names, in some cases. so the issue will likely vanish if you rename createArray to newArray, or something named new*. so it expects a convention (the ones used by Apple) to be followed.

therefore, it's the message that's bit shallow, it doesn't really analyze the program, but bases its findings/results on convention -- and not an actual evident issue which a human can read.

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If you're just using the array in your viewDidLoad method, then you don't need to alloc an array in there at all. You can just use an autoreleased array returned as 7KV7 suggested. You can return an autoreleased array in your -(void)createArray as well without alloc'ing an object. Here is an example.

- (void)viewDidLoad
{
 NSArray* myarr = [self createArray];
 for (NSString* str in myarr) 
 {
  NSLog(@"%@",str);
 }
}

-(NSArray*)createArray
{
 return [NSArray arrayWithObjects:@"APPLE",@"MAC",@"IPHONE",nil];

}

If you don't have to alloc an object to use it, it makes for less, and cleaner code, IMO.

share|improve this answer
    
I know this. But I basically want to know why the compiler give leak errors in my code. please see the reply from justin. any way thanks for the reply. – Satyam Mar 22 '11 at 5:34

Try this

- (void)viewDidLoad
{
 NSArray* myarr = [[NSArray alloc] initWithArray:[self createArray]];
 for (NSString* str in myarr) 
 {
  NSLog(@"%@",str);
 }
 [myarr release];
}

-(NSArray*)createArray
{
 NSArray* arr1 = [[NSArray alloc] initWithObjects:@"APPLE",@"MAC",@"IPHONE",nil];
 return [arr1 auotrelease];
}

The problem with your code is that

  1. You do not allocate myarr using alloc or new so you do not take ownership of the object. Hence the issue in release.

  2. You allocate arr1 so you take ownership of the object and you return arr1. Hence you do not release it. That is the reason for the leak.

share|improve this answer
    
His code doesn't have any leaks. The static analyzer isn't smart enough to realize this. The code you offer needlessly creates two arrays. – imaginaryboy Mar 22 '11 at 5:36

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