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i have the following problem
Given a string, return a "cleaned" string where adjacent chars that are the same have been reduced to a single char. So "yyzzza" yields "yza".

stringClean("yyzzza") → "yza"      
stringClean("abbbcdd") → "abcd"       
stringClean("Hello") → "Helo"

Im trying my code for the input stringClean("abbbcdd") → "abcd"

My code is below.Im getting the partial appended string after doing the adjacent character comparison hence as of now im getting appended stringBuilder "sb=abc" which is not the correct output i should get the output as "abcd",

class cleanString{

    public static String stringClean(String str){
        int startIndex = str.indexOf(str);
        char startChar = '\u0000';
        char adjacentChar = '\u0000';
        System.out.println("startIndex-->" + startIndex);
        final StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();

        for(startIndex = 0; startIndex < str.length(); startIndex += 1){
            startChar = str.charAt(startIndex);
            System.out.println("startIndex ::" + startIndex);
            System.out.println("startChar ::" + startChar);

            final int adjacentPosition = startIndex + 1;
            System.out.println("adjacentPosition ::" + adjacentPosition);
            if(adjacentPosition != str.length()){
                adjacentChar = str.charAt(adjacentPosition);
                System.out.println("adjacentChar ::" + adjacentChar);
            }
            if(startChar == adjacentChar){
                System.out.println("startChar ::" + startChar);
                System.out.println("adjacentChar::" + adjacentChar);

                System.out.println("Before Substring string --->" + str);
                str = str.substring(1);
                startIndex--;
                System.out.println("After Substring string --->" + str);
                System.out.println("IndexOf check ---->"
                    + sb.toString().indexOf(startChar));
                if(sb.toString().indexOf(startChar) != -1){
                    sb.append(adjacentChar);
                    System.out.println("Appended String in if part-->"
                        + sb.toString());
                }
            } else{
                str = str.substring(1);
                startIndex--;
                sb.append(startChar);
                System.out.println("Appended String --->" + sb.toString());
            }
        }// end of for loop
        return sb.toString();
    }

    //im getting output as abc...which is partial appended string      
    public static void main(String ...args){     
        String outputCleanString=new cleanString().stringClean("abbbcdd");      
        System.out.println("Cleaned String --->"+outputCleanString);
    }      

}  

*Observation:*after i get the appended string "abc",and then when i move to compare the final set of characters "dd" im facing the problem in that part.

share|improve this question
    
can you check whats wrong with my code,i need correction there –  Deepak Mar 22 '11 at 9:14
    
Is this a homework question? If so, then please flag it as such. –  Michael Kjörling Mar 22 '11 at 9:19
    
no,Michael its not a homework question.i just saw this question in one of the websites and im solving it –  Deepak Mar 22 '11 at 9:22

12 Answers 12

up vote 0 down vote accepted

For your code and the specific issue you have mentioned if the adjacent position is beyond the bounds of your string set adjacentChar to the null char as otherwise adjacentChar is seen as the last character in the string, which means that an append is not done.

if(adjacentPosition != str.length()){
     adjacentChar = str.charAt(adjacentPosition);
     System.out.println("adjacentChar ::" + adjacentChar);
}

else {
     adjacentChar = '/u0000';
}

EDIT

I think that the second issue you have mentioned is in this piece of code

 if(sb.toString().indexOf(startChar) != -1){
      sb.append(adjacentChar);
      System.out.println("Appended String in if part-->"
         + sb.toString());
 }

As e and o are in the buffer from Hello they are being appended when Bookkeeper is being checked. I don't think you need that line so remove it and that should fix Hello Bookkeeper.

Although Mohoamed's answer will also work.

share|improve this answer
    
you made my day it works fine.!!!!Thanks Belinda –  Deepak Mar 22 '11 at 9:51
    
adjacentChar='\u0000' –  Deepak Mar 22 '11 at 9:58
    
@Belinda,it fails for one condition stringClean("Hello Bookkeeper") → "Helo Bokeper" could you help me out now,im getting "Helo Bookeeper",The Second Part of Bookeeper is not getting reduced. –  Deepak Mar 22 '11 at 10:28
    
Remove the append if the character is already in the buffer (e, l and o will be in it from Hello) and I think that that will fix it. Let me know if it works. –  Belinda Mar 22 '11 at 10:48
1  
Read Peter's solution below, and consider the items I listed above. If this is homework where you were asked to fix a broken routine, I suggest you do so yourself rather than asking someone else to do it. –  AndyT Mar 22 '11 at 13:20

If a regex based solution is acceptable you can do:

str = str.replaceAll("(.)\\1+","$1");

Ideone Link

share|improve this answer
    
can you check whats wrong with my code,i need correction there –  Deepak Mar 22 '11 at 9:12
5  
Sometimes, the correct solution is to throw out what you have and start over from scratch. –  Michael Kjörling Mar 22 '11 at 9:20
1  
+1 for really simple and function solution –  michal.kreuzman Mar 22 '11 at 9:22

First of all, your code is overly complicated. There is absolutely no need to

            str = str.substring(1);
            startIndex--;

inside the loop - you are effectively keeping startIndex at 0 and chopping off characters from the beginning of the string. Instead, you should just iterate through the characters of string (and print str.substring(startIndex) if you want to see what's left to process).

Also, here

            if(sb.toString().indexOf(startChar) != -1){
                sb.append(adjacentChar);
                System.out.println("Appended String in if part-->"
                    + sb.toString());
            }

you aim to prevent adding the same character again if it is repeated more than twice in a row - but the code actually prevents adding a character to the builder ever if it is already in there, i.e. an input like "aba" will yield the incorrect output "ab".

And actually, there is the source of your error too. The condition is wrong:

            if(sb.toString().indexOf(startChar) != -1){

yields true when startChar is found in the string contained by sb! If you change != to ==, you will get your 'd' in the output (however, you will get an extra 'b' too).

Corrected algorithm

Your approach of always comparing the actual character to the next one fails when the same character is repeated more than twice in a row. The better approach is to just remember the last character appended to the buffer and skip until you find a character different from it:

public static String stringClean(String str){
    final StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
    char lastAppendedChar = '\u0000';

    for(int index = 0; index < str.length(); index += 1){
        char actualChar = str.charAt(index);

        if (actualChar != lastAppendedChar){
            sb.append(actualChar);
            lastAppendedChar = actualChar;
        }
    }// end of for loop
    return sb.toString();
}
share|improve this answer
    
Could you alter my code and correct it,Im struggling with this for a long time –  Deepak Mar 22 '11 at 9:18
    
whats the fix for my code,Could you alter it please –  Deepak Mar 22 '11 at 9:34
    
@Deepak, I added the fixed code. –  Péter Török Mar 22 '11 at 9:51
    
Thanks Peter,you came to my rescue.SOS –  Deepak Mar 22 '11 at 9:52
    
Peter is absolutely correct, and his solution is much, much cleaner. Before I read his answer, I went off and wrote my own routine and matched his line for line. A good solution is usually the 'obvious' solution and this seems to be it. –  AndyT Mar 22 '11 at 12:10

The problem in you code is that you append the char not when new is found but when adjetance is different then curent, so always last character would not be appended.

share|improve this answer
    
whats the fix for my code –  Deepak Mar 22 '11 at 9:26
    
As the last char or chars would never by appended, so ugly solution is to append to result last char. But I would change it totally, MarcoS solution seams to be correct. –  Damian Leszczyński - Vash Mar 22 '11 at 9:36
    
Thanks Vash...... –  Deepak Mar 22 '11 at 9:54
public static String stringClean(String str) {
    if (str == null || "".equals(str)) {
        return str;
    }
    char lastChar = str.charAt(0);
    StringBuilder resultBuilder = new StringBuilder();
    resultBuilder.append(lastChar);
    for (int index = 1; index < str.length(); index++) {
        char next = str.charAt(index);
        if (lastChar != next) {
            resultBuilder.append(next);
            lastChar = next;
        }
    }

    return resultBuilder.toString();
}
share|improve this answer
    
can you check whats wrong with my code,i need correction there ,Please help to solve my code as well –  Deepak Mar 22 '11 at 9:16

I would do it like this:

public static String stringClean(String str) {
    if (str == null || "".equals(str))
        return str;
    StringBuffer buffer = new StringBuffer();
    char[] chars = str.toCharArray();
    buffer.append(chars[0]);
    for (int i = 1; i < chars.length; i++) {
        if (chars[i] != chars[i-1])
            buffer.append(chars[i]);
    }
    return buffer.toString();
}
share|improve this answer
public static String stringClean(String str){
    int startIndex = str.indexOf(str);
    char startChar = '\u0000';
    char adjacentChar = '\u0000';
    boolean flag = false; // added
    System.out.println("startIndex-->" + startIndex);
    final StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();

    for(startIndex = 0; startIndex < str.length(); startIndex++){
        startChar = str.charAt(startIndex);
        System.out.println("startIndex ::" + startIndex);
        System.out.println("startChar ::" + startChar);

        final int adjacentPosition = startIndex + 1;
        System.out.println("adjacentPosition ::" + adjacentPosition);
        if(adjacentPosition != str.length()){
            adjacentChar = str.charAt(adjacentPosition);
            System.out.println("adjacentChar ::" + adjacentChar);
        } else {
            flag = true;
        }
        if(startChar == adjacentChar){
            System.out.println("startChar ::" + startChar);
            System.out.println("adjacentChar::" + adjacentChar);

            System.out.println("Before Substring string --->" + str);
            str = str.substring(1);
            startIndex--;
            System.out.println("After Substring string --->" + str);
            System.out.println("IndexOf check ---->"
                + sb.toString().indexOf(startChar));
            if(sb.toString().indexOf(startChar) != -1){
                sb.append(adjacentChar);
                System.out.println("Appended String in if part-->"
                    + sb.toString());
            } else if(flag) {                   /* added */
                sb.append(adjacentChar);
            }
        } else{
            str = str.substring(1);
            startIndex--;
            sb.append(startChar);
            System.out.println("Appended String --->" + sb.toString());
        }
    }// end of for loop
    return sb.toString();
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Mohammed –  Deepak Mar 22 '11 at 9:53

How about trying this one:

public String stringClean(String string){
    char sc[] = string.toCharArray();

    for(int i =0;i<sc.length;i++){
        if(i!=sc.length-1){
            if(sc[i]!=(sc[i+1])){
                output+=sc[i];
            }
        }else {
            output+=sc[i];
        }
    }
    return  output;
    //System.out.println(output);
}
share|improve this answer

If you aren't restricted to use collections from java.util I recommend to use Set. See example below.

public static String stringClean(String input) {
    Set<Character> result = new LinkedHashSet<Character>();

    for (char c : input.toCharArray()) {
        result.add(c);
    }

    StringBuilder sb  = new StringBuilder();
    for (char c : result)
        sb.append(c);
    return sb.toString();
}
share|improve this answer
function cleanString(toClean){
    return toClean.replace(/(\S)\1(\1)*/g,"$1")
}

Demo in jsFiddle

share|improve this answer
1  
\1(\1)* = \1+ –  codaddict Mar 22 '11 at 9:44
    
(insert slap to one's forehead here) –  Xhalent Mar 22 '11 at 10:42
    
hey wtf, why did you add this cleanString cluggy unreadable method? the code supposed to be simple, it is for beginners; your code is appreciated but, nobody cares about writing extremely smart piece of code, –  ERJAN May 6 '13 at 15:21

How about:

public String stringClean(String str) {
  if (str.length() < 2)return str; 

  String nextStr = str.substring(1);

  if (str.charAt(0) == str.charAt(1)) {
    return stringClean(nextStr);
  }

  else return str.substring(0,1) +  stringClean(nextStr);
}
share|improve this answer

Looks like you are solving codingbat problems, it is good,

I m a beginner too. This exercise is supposed to be just using recursion

This is my solution:

public String stringClean(String str) {
  if (str.length() <= 1)
      return str;

  String adj1 = str.substring(0,1);
  String adj2 = str.substring(1,2);

  String rest = str.substring(1);

  if (adj1.equals(adj2)) {
      return stringClean(rest);
  } else
      return adj1 + stringClean(rest);
}

Hope it helps

share|improve this answer
    
hey nhathd, you should not change my solution, the question is for beginners, don't add some smart code here. i value it , but this was a wrong move! –  ERJAN May 6 '13 at 15:23

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