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I have a class with the following schema

class MyClass
{
   const x = 'abc';
   const y = '123';

   function _contruct() {}
}

Is there any way for me to have the constants remain unset in the class body, and be set dynamically after the constructor has been called? E.g something like this:

class MyClass
{
   const x;
   const y;

   function _contruct()
   {
      $this->setStuff();
   }

   function setStuff()
   {
     $this->x = Config::getX();
     $this->y = Config::getY();
   }
}
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1  
Just curious, what are you trying to accomplish here? –  Mark Nenadov Mar 22 '11 at 9:54
    
@Mark the classs right now requires some config values to be hard coded in the class body, I'm trying to change it so they are fetched from the config class later on in the class –  Click Upvote Mar 22 '11 at 9:56
1  
Seems pointless to make them constants then. –  Mark Nenadov Mar 22 '11 at 9:58
    
I didn't, its from legacy code. I'm refactoring it.. –  Click Upvote Mar 22 '11 at 10:19
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5 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

As the name suggests, that value cannot change during the execution of the script (except for magic constants, which aren't actually constants) (http://php.net/manual/en/language.constants.php)

So, no. You could make them private vars.

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No. Class constants (and global or namespace constants defined with the const keyword) have to be literal values and must be set prior to runtime. That's where they differ from the old-school define() constants that are set at runtime. It's not possible to change or set a const constant during the execution of a script.

The value must be a constant expression, not (for example) a variable, a property, a result of a mathematical operation, or a function call.

from PHP manual: Class Constants

So that's possible:

define('MY_CONST', someFunctionThatReturnsAValue());

But that's not:

const MY_CONST = someFunctionThatReturnsAValue();

// or

class MyClass {
    const MY_CONST = = someFunctionThatReturnsAValue();
}

// or

namespace MyNamespace;
const MY_CONST = someFunctionThatReturnsAValue();

And by using $this in your example one might assume that you try to set the constants on the instance level but class constants are always statically defined on the class level.

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The problem with old skool define statements is that they are not limited in scope. It would be useful if they took a cue from C++, and allowed constants the functionality to be assigned at run time. This way, if we want to save some data for later verification (such as a User ID), we can still declare it at run time (say, from a $_SESSION variable), restrict it to a class, and make it unchangeable. Very good explanation, however. Thanks guys! –  Atomox Nov 29 '11 at 21:40
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No, constants are constants because they are supposed to be constant. Declaring them with empty values first and changing those values with something else effectively means they are variable. Since your aim seems to be to set them once, but not ever after, consider Constructor Injection, e.g.

class MyClass
{
    private $x;
    private $y;
    public function __construct($x, $y)
    {
        $this->x = $x;
        $this->y = $y;
    }
}

As long as your class doesnt expose any methods to modify $x and $y and you're not chaning them internally, they are effectively constant. The only thing you cannot do with non-public variables is MyClass::X then, but I'm of the opinion that you shouldn't use class constants outside their respective classes anyway because it introduces coupling between the consumer and the class.

Simple as that.

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Constants is "constant". You cant change it.

You can use variable for this.

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Impossible. If you could set x and y in setStuff(), you could also (re-)set them in any other method. Per definition a constant cannot change. Therefore your x and y would be variables, not constants.

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