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I am trying to create an audit trigger without having to specifiy the column list more than once.

To this end, I want to product a temporary table of the content of the INSERTED or DELETED data in the trigger, then process that into an audit table.

If I use this:

IF @ChangeType = 'D'
  SELECT * INTO #tmp FROM DELETED
ELSE
  SELECT * INTO #tmp FROM INSERTED

Then I get a compilation error at the 2nd SELECT * INTO that the table #tmp already exists.

If I try and work around this using dynamic SQL:

SET @Sql = 'SELECT * INTO #tmp FROM '
IF @ChangeType = 'D'
   SET @Sql = @Sq + 'DELETED'
ELSE
   SET @Sql = @Sql + 'INSERTED'

EXEC (@Sql)

Then I get an error that the DELETED and INSERTED tables do not exist.

How can I get the INSERTED and DELETED tables in a trigger into a temporary or other in-memory table?

share|improve this question
    
Why do you not want to specify the column list more than once? I'm sure you have spent more time on this question than it would have taken to write out the SQL. :) – Tony Mar 22 '11 at 11:35
    
The only reason is because there should be no reason to have to specify them more than once. I guess 'to remove the scope for error when making changes' is the best explanation. – Craig Mar 22 '11 at 12:02
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Try to create the temporary table outside the if, like:

SELECT TOP 0 * INTO #tmp FROM DELETED

IF @ChangeType = 'D'
  INSERT INTO #tmp SELECT * FROM DELETED
ELSE
  INSERT INTO #tmp SELECT * FROM INSERTED
share|improve this answer
1  
made my answer too long... 7s! – RichardTheKiwi Mar 22 '11 at 11:37
    
I always used "WHERE 1=0", but reading this I dropped my head in shame. "TOP 0" is much more explicit about what is being done, and so I'm voting for what I should have been doing, rather than what I have been doing. – MatBailie Mar 22 '11 at 11:46

This is a known problem due to the resolve-on-parse of the temp table object. With two SELECT - INTO statements in the same scope, SQL Server throws the towel.

SELECT * INTO #tmp FROM DELETED WHERE 1=0
IF @ChangeType = 'D'
  INSERT #tmp SELECT * FROM DELETED
ELSE
  INSERT #tmp SELECT * FROM INSERTED
share|improve this answer

I'd be interested as to why you need to copy the data into another table in the first place. But, that's off-topic...

Temporary table (#temp) are notionally stored on disc, and Table Variables (@temp) are notionally only in memory and may be more optimal for small tasks. (Assumes writes to the table will normally only affect small numbers of rows.)

Temporary tables, however, can be created using the SELECT INTO trick, avoiding the need to know the table definition in advance.

If you do know the table definition in advance, however, can't you simply use something such as the following?

DECLARE @temp TABLE (id AS INT, val as INT)

IF @ChangeType = 'D'
   INSERT INTO @temp SELECT * FROM DELETED
ELSE
   INSERT INTO @temp SELECT * FROM INSERTED


Personally, I'd even avoid using * if possible. Your subsequent queries will only use specific fields, so I'd only copy the fields I was using. This has the added benefit that if fields are added to the table, the code doesn't break...

DECLARE @temp TABLE (id AS INT, val as INT)

IF @ChangeType = 'D'
   INSERT INTO @temp SELECT id, val FROM DELETED
ELSE
   INSERT INTO @temp SELECT id, val FROM INSERTED


In my mind, the advantage of specifying the fields (which is what you wish to avoid), is that you can ensure that you always only copy what you need.

share|improve this answer
    
All fields will later be used, so I select all fields. The point here is to remove the need to specifiy a field list more than once, and hence reduce the possibility of errors when making making changes. In the end, it seems very silly to be having to specify the same list of columns more than once. – Craig Mar 22 '11 at 12:04
    
The difference between table variables and #temp tables is logging,recompilation and statistics. Not memory vs disc. Try declare @a table(c int) insert into @a select 1 union all select 2 select sys.fn_PhysLocFormatter(%%physloc%%) from @a you will see the file:page:slot in tempdb of the rows. Of course that page may never get flushed to disc but the same is true of #temp tables. – Martin Smith Mar 22 '11 at 14:15

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