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In a REST server that I've written, I have several collection classes that wrap single items to be returned from my services:

@XmlAccessorType(XmlAccessType.NONE)
@XmlRootElement(name = "person_collection")
public final class PersonCollection {
    @XmlElement(name = "person")
    protected final List<Person> collection = new ArrayList<Person>();

    public List<Person> getCollection() {
        return collection;
    }
}

I would like to refactor these to use generics so the the boilerplate code can be implemented in a superclass:

public abstract class AbstractCollection<T> {
    protected final List<T> collection = new ArrayList<T>();

    public List<T> getCollection() {
        return collection;
    }
}

@XmlAccessorType(XmlAccessType.NONE)
@XmlRootElement(name = "person_collection")
public final class PersonCollection extends AbstractCollection<Person> {}

How do I set the @XmlElement annotation on the superclass collection? I am thinking of something involving a @XmlJavaTypeAdapter and reflection, but was hoping for something simpler. How do I create the JAXBContext? BTW, I am using RestEasy 1.2.1 GA for the JAX-RS front-end.

UPDATE (for Andrew White): Here is code that demonstrates getting the Class object for the type parameter(s):

import java.lang.reflect.ParameterizedType;
import java.lang.reflect.Type;
import java.lang.reflect.TypeVariable;
import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.List;

public class TestReflection
        extends AbstractCollection<String> {
    public static void main(final String[] args) {
        final TestReflection testReflection = new TestReflection();

        final Class<?> cls = testReflection.getClass();
        final Type[] types = ((ParameterizedType) cls.getGenericSuperclass()).getActualTypeArguments();
        for (final Type t : types) {
            final Class<?> typeVariable = (Class<?>) t;
            System.out.println(typeVariable.getCanonicalName());
        }
    }
}

class AbstractCollection<T> {
    protected List<T> collection = new ArrayList<T>();
}

Here is the output: java.lang.String.

share|improve this question
    
You don't have to specify the name attribute on @XmlElement, so you can just add @XmlElement to AbstractCollection.collection, and let JAXB infer the element name. –  skaffman Mar 23 '11 at 11:14
    
@skaffman: Its not working. I get a javax.xml.bind.JAXBException: class com.example.Person nor any of its super class is known to this context –  Ralph Mar 23 '11 at 12:19
    
Well that's an error in how you're creating your JAXB context. Add that to your question, and I'll post an answer. –  skaffman Mar 23 '11 at 12:38
    
@skaffman: Added. See above :-). –  Ralph Mar 23 '11 at 13:04
1  
+1 Great question - Currently debugging this issue with EclipseLink JAXB (MOXy). –  Blaise Doughan Mar 23 '11 at 18:52
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Reflection Issue

The following is the reflection test that needs to be made work. I believe type erasure is what is preventing this from happening:

import java.lang.reflect.Method;
import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.List;

public class TestReflection extends AbstractCollection<String> {

    private List<Integer> childCollection = new ArrayList<Integer>();


    public List<Integer> getChildCollection() {
        return childCollection;
    }

    public static void main(final String[] args) throws Exception {
        final TestReflection testReflection = new TestReflection();

        final Class<?> cls = testReflection.getClass();
        Method method1 = cls.getMethod("getChildCollection", new Class[] {});
        System.out.println(method1.getGenericReturnType());

        Method method2 = cls.getMethod("getCollection", new Class[] {});
        System.out.println(method2.getGenericReturnType());
   }

}

The above code will output what is shown below. This is because the "getCollection" method is in the context of AbstractCollection and not TestReflection. This is to ensure backwards compatibility of the Java binaries:

java.util.List<java.lang.Integer>
java.util.List<T>

Alternative Approach

If the items in the collection will be annotated with @XmlRootElement, then you could achieve what you want to do with the following:

import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.List;
import javax.xml.bind.annotation.XmlAnyElement;

public abstract class AbstractCollection<T> {

    protected List<T> collection = new ArrayList<T>();

    @XmlAnyElement(lax=true)
    public List<T> getCollection() {
        return collection;
    }

}

And assuming Person looks like the following:

import javax.xml.bind.annotation.XmlRootElement;

@XmlRootElement
public class Person {

}

Then the following demo code:

import javax.xml.bind.JAXBContext;
import javax.xml.bind.Marshaller;

public class Demo {

    public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
        JAXBContext jc = JAXBContext.newInstance(PersonCollection.class, Person.class);

        PersonCollection pc = new PersonCollection();
        pc.getCollection().add(new Person());
        pc.getCollection().add(new Person());

        Marshaller marshaller = jc.createMarshaller();
        marshaller.setProperty(Marshaller.JAXB_FORMATTED_OUTPUT, true);
        marshaller.marshal(pc, System.out);
    }

}

Will produce:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8" standalone="yes"?>
<person_collection>
    <person/>
    <person/>
</person_collection>

For more information see:

share|improve this answer
    
In this case, though, can't we just read the generic type from the subclass (<String>)? I can't find a good tutorial on JAXB that does not involve an XML schema. I hand-coded my classes and need to annotate them so that they marshal/unmarshal correctly. I have it working well if I do not refactor to an abstract superclass, but I dislike the amount of boilerplate code that produces. –  Ralph Mar 24 '11 at 13:19
    
@Ralph - The trick is knowing that <String> from the subclass can be applied to the List (I'm hoping there is a way). I have added an alternate approach to my answer that may work for you. My blog is a good example of using JAXB starting from classes: bdoughan.blogspot.com –  Blaise Doughan Mar 24 '11 at 13:23
    
Your edit looks right on target. I'll have to play with it. I'll take a look at your blog. –  Ralph Mar 24 '11 at 13:23
    
@Ralph - You may find the following article useful: bdoughan.blogspot.com/2010/08/… –  Blaise Doughan Mar 24 '11 at 13:26
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I think what you are asking is not possible due to type erasure. Any generic solution would lose the "type" of the container needed for unmarshalling.

share|improve this answer
    
I believe that I can get the type information using reflection (if necessary). The method java.lang.reflect.Field.getGenericType() returns a Type object (probably instance of TypeVariable) that can be used to retrieve the actual type of the collection. In the worst case, I can have each subclass constructor pass a single Class<?> parameter of its "child" type to AbstractCollection. –  Ralph Mar 22 '11 at 13:00
    
I hope you are right but I think there is a limitation there; honestly, I can't remember the caveats of reflection and generics right off the top of my head, only that some exist. –  Andrew White Mar 22 '11 at 13:05
    
See the update to my question. –  Ralph Mar 22 '11 at 13:57
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