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I've got a 'Task' table with the following columns (the TaskOrder is for ordering the children within the scope of the parent, not the entire table):

TaskId
ParentTaskId
TaskName
TaskOrder

I've got this CTE query to return all the rows:

with tasks (TaskId, ParentTaskId, [Name]) as
(
    select parentTasks.TaskId,
           parentTasks.ParentTaskId,
           parentTasks.[Name]
    from   Task parentTasks
    where  ParentTaskId is null

    union all

    select childTasks.TaskId,
           childTasks.ParentTaskId,
           childTasks.[Name]
    from   Task childTasks
    join   tasks
    on     childTasks.ParentTaskId = tasks.TaskId
)

select * from tasks

This query returns all the tasks ordered by their level as you'd expect. How can I change it to order the results into their hierarchy order as below?

- Task 1
-- Task 1 Subtask 1
-- Task 1 Subtask 2
- Task 2
- Task 3

Thanks.

Edit: The answer should work with an unlimited numbr of levels.

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Are you just experimenting with CTEs, or is this simpler to you than straight SQL? –  le dorfier Feb 11 '09 at 22:53
    
Yes, experimenting with CTE, but if there's a better solution with straight SQL I'll use that.. –  Nick Feb 11 '09 at 23:04
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4 Answers

One way you could do this is to add a hierarchy column that has all previous IDs in a list:

with tasks (TaskId, ParentTaskId, [Name], TaskIdList) as
(
    select parentTasks.TaskId,
           parentTasks.ParentTaskId,
           parentTasks.[Name],
           parentTasks.TaskId
    from   Task parentTasks
    where  ParentTaskId is null

    union all

    select childTasks.TaskId,
           childTasks.ParentTaskId,
           childTasks.[Name],
           tasks.TaskIdList + '.' + childTasks.TaskId
    from   Task childTasks
    join   tasks
    on     childTasks.ParentTaskId = tasks.TaskId
)

select TaskId, ParentTaskId, [Name] from tasks
   order by TaskIdList

Note that this assumes that TaskId is a string-based ID. If not, you should cast it to a varchar before concatenating it.

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Thanks, was hoping to find a solution that didn't require additional columns; this makes it a bit harder to maintain when child tasks are moved between parents. –  Nick Feb 12 '09 at 18:23
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up vote 2 down vote accepted

Solved the problem using a variation of Mark's method, but I'm not retaining the node path in every node, so I can more easily move them around the tree. Instead I changed my 'OrderBy' column from an int to varchar(3) left-padded with zeros so I can concatenate them into a master 'OrderBy' for all the rows returned.

with tasks (TaskId, ParentTaskId, OrderBy, [Name], RowOrder) as
(
    select  parentTasks.TaskId,
            parentTasks.ParentTaskId,
            parentTasks.OrderBy,
            parentTasks.[Name],
            cast(parentTasks.OrderBy as varchar(30)) 'RowOrder'
    from    Task parentTasks
    where   ParentTaskId is null

    union all

    select  childTasks.TaskId,
            childTasks.ParentTaskId,
            childTasks.OrderBy,
            childTasks.[Name],
            cast(tasks.RowOrder + childTasks.OrderBy as varchar(30)) 'RowOrder'
    from    Task childTasks
    join    tasks
    on      childTasks.ParentTaskId = tasks.TaskId
)

select * from tasks order by RowOrder

This returns:

TaskId  ParentTaskId  OrderBy  Name                              RowOrder
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
1       NULL          001      Task One                          001
15      1             001      Task One / Task One               001001
2       NULL          002      Task Two                          002
7       2             001      Task Two / Task One               002001
14      7             001      Task Two / Task One / Task One    002001001
8       2             002      Task Two / Task Two               002002
9       8             001      Task Two / Task Two / Task One    002002001
10      8             002      Task Two / Task Two / Task Two    002002002
11      8             003      Task Two / Task Two / Task Three  002002003
3       NULL          003      Task Three                        003
4       NULL          004      Task Four                         004
13      4             001      Task Four / Task One              004001
5       NULL          005      Task Five                         005
6       NULL          006      Task Six                          006    
17      NULL          007      Task Seven                        007
18      NULL          008      Task Eight                        008
19      NULL          009      Task Nine                         009
21      19            001      Task Nine / Task One              009001
20      NULL          010      Task Ten                          010

It doesn't allow for an unlimited hierarchy (max 10 levels / max 1000 children per parent node - if I'd started the OrderBy at 0) but more than enough for my needs.

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You don't need all that union stuff, I think this should work:

select
 TaskId,
 ParentTaskId,
 [Name],
 COALESCE(ParentTaskId, TaskId) as groupField
from
 task
order by
 COALESCE(ParentTaskId, TaskId), ParentTaskId, TaskId
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1  
Almost, but only works for 2 levels. I need more.. Thanks –  Nick Feb 12 '09 at 18:19
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Since you don't specify "ORDER BY", how do you expect that it returns them in any particular order (other than hoping the query analyzer will work in some expected fashion?).

If you want it in ParentTaskId, TaskId order, then select the TaskId as ParentTaskId and NULL as TaskId in the first UNION element; then

ORDER BY ParentTaskId, TaskId?

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Correct, big omission! I've got an 'order by' column too for ordering the children within the parent –  Nick Feb 12 '09 at 18:26
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