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For some unknown reasons this silly thing cant be implemented.

I have an int count in the main form which I want to return to another class or form.

namespace my_speller
{
   public partial class login : Form
   {
       public login()
       {
        InitializeComponent();
       }

      int count;
      private void btnlogin_MouseUp(object sender, MouseEventArgs e)
      {
           dbaccess obj = new dbaccess();

           for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
           {
                    if (txtusername.Text == obj.Usersusername()[i])
                    {
                        count = i;
                        break;
                    }
           }
       } 

       public int namecount()
       {
        return count;
       }

    }
}

dbaccess is another class and I could successfully call a function (Usersusername) defined in that class to my login form. Everything works fine up to this. Now I want to get the int count from main form back to dbaccess class. So I implemented a public function namecount to return count. But count is always zero in the other class. In the main form, I get the value of count correctly (which is i). But nothing gets returned when I call from dbaccess class this way:

        login obj = new login();
       // do stuff

or from another form in the same program, like this:

namespace my_speller
{
   public partial class student : Form
   {
      public student()
      {
        InitializeComponent();
      }

    private void button3_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        login obj = new login();
        MessageBox.Show(obj.namecount().ToString());
    }

The messagebox here should display count which is some number, but what's displayed is zero. What could possibly be the cause??

The same thing happens when I'm trying to return a string from my main form. It's always null in other classes :(

Thanks in advance

Edit: Can you give the code snippet itself. I cant know the technical terms you might use to help me

share|improve this question
    
Although this isn't part of the question, I would suggest you capitalize the class names, as it adds unnecessary confusion- they look like variable names or functions at the moment. –  Alexander Kondratskiy Mar 22 '11 at 13:48
    
^ thanks. I'll take care of it in future –  nawfal Mar 22 '11 at 13:57
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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This code will create a new instance of your Login form. Each instance will have its own instance variable count.

login obj = new login();
MessageBox.Show(obj.namecount().ToString());

The default value for an integer is 0, so each time you create a new instance of the form it will have the value of 0 in the count variable. If you want to have all instances of the form have the same value for count, you should make count static.

private static int count;

When the variable is static, there will be only one instance of count shared by all instances of the Login form.

var form1 = new login();
// mouse up event fires on form1, value of count is set to 3 (for example)
var form2 = new login();
form2.namecount(); // returns 3

Depending on what you want to do, there are other patterns, like using events, or a mediator that can help pass messages between components. This way when something happens in one form, other forms can react to the change without actually needing to reference or even know about the other forms in the application.

share|improve this answer
    
What's var here? –  nawfal Mar 22 '11 at 13:33
    
Thanks, this worked. Every other answer should work fine too. But this did it for me. Thanks once again. –  nawfal Mar 22 '11 at 13:43
    
@nawfal the 'var' keyword is in c# 3 and 4. When you use it, the compiler figures out what the type is by looking at the operations on the right side of the assignment operator (=). In this case, new login() will return an instance of the login class, so the compiler knows that form1 is of type login. It is a shorter way of writing 'login form1 = new login();'. –  NerdFury Mar 22 '11 at 13:44
    
^yes absolutely. I use .net 2 and that's why I din find that. But yeah, I did this way as u mentioned now from my intuition (before seeing your post) and got it working :P –  nawfal Mar 22 '11 at 13:48
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private void button3_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
   login obj = new login();
   MessageBox.Show(obj.namecount().ToString());
}

Every time button3_Click is called, a new login object is instantiated. In other words, obj is not a reference to your main form; it is a reference to another object of the same type as your main form.

Every time a login object is instantiated, count defaults to zero.

share|improve this answer
    
Ok, then how to create a reference to main form? –  nawfal Mar 22 '11 at 13:22
    
You can't create a reference to an existing object out of thin air. I assume that your main form creates an instance of a student object. If so, then your main form will also need to pass a reference of itself to the student object. –  mbeckish Mar 22 '11 at 13:25
    
So, your student object will need to provide a public property or method that accepts an object of type "login". This is what your main form will then use to pass the reference. –  mbeckish Mar 22 '11 at 13:26
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Where do you show the form? What you're doing is code is simply creating a new instance of the login form, and reading the nameCount value, which is still at its initialized value: 0.

I think you should use ShowDialog and return the result in a DialogResult. If that's OK, then read the count value.

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