Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

ok, I know this is asked a million times, but I still can't seem to find a working solution. Hopefully I'm just missing something. Using entity with silverlight, through RIA I have a many to many table structure in my DB.

[System] - [SystemUsers] - [Users] 

The bridge table just has the two IDs so naturaly entity doens't include it in the model.

I know RIA doesn't like many to many relationships, so I've added Association attribute tags to the collection, and can now at least see the collection property on the client side.

[Association("DMSSystem_Users", "DMSSystemId", "UserId")]
[Include]
[Composition]
public EntityCollection<Users> Users { get; set; }

In my domain service I've tried including the users:

public IQueryable<DMSSystem> GetSystem()
{
    return this.ObjectContext.DMSSystem.Include("Users");
}

I never get the users on the client side Is there something else I am missing to get the users to be inculded and sent to the client?

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

RIA with EF has a dislike for M:M relationships. What you need to do is to help RIA see the M:M as two 1:M relationships.

On your link table add an extra column (I add something like IgnoreThisField) and make it a bit type.

When EF sees this table it will now interpret it differently allowing you to handle the M:M relationship.

share|improve this answer
    
can this be avoided by using the [Association] attrubute? (assuming I can figure out how to use it properly) I don't really want to modify my datamodel and re-create my domains AGAIN .... –  Shaboboo Mar 22 '11 at 15:03
    
I think you need to modify your datamodel (sorry). Adding an association is only going to add more relationship information to your entities, on top of the RIA generated M:M. –  Rus Mar 22 '11 at 16:13
3  
This is by far the most absurd limitation of RIA. It should never have shipped in this state - it's utterly shameful that they use words like "domain model" to fool developers into thinking we can develop actual rich domains with such fundamental limitations. –  Martin Doms Mar 22 '11 at 20:16
    
I would keep an eye on the RIA wish list dotnet.uservoice.com/forums/57026-wcf-ria-services. The M:M problem is on the list. –  Rus Mar 22 '11 at 20:55

I don't know Entity Framework but here's how this works in RIA with NHibernate...

My model is Users - UserRoleGrant - Role. You'll have to do the translation to your model in your head.

The important parts of the following code are... ensure you have the correct association names on your model, ensure you have the correct property names set in your associations, set the UserID property on the UserRoleAssociation when you set it's User property. If you don't set this ID you wont have access to the related entity via the assocation property.

You probably don't need the Composition attribute either but you might so read this to find out... http://ria.feedables.com/story/4583193/Composition-Support-in-RIA-Services

public class User 
{
    ...snip...
    [Include]
    [Association("UserToRoleAssociation", "Id", "UserId", IsForeignKey = false)]
    public virtual IList<UserRoleAssociation> RoleGrants
    { 
        get
        {
            return this.roleGrants;
        }
    }
}

public class UserRoleAssociation 
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Backing field for User
    /// </summary>
    private User user;

    /// <summary>
    /// Gets or sets the id.
    /// </summary>
    /// <value>The relationships id.</value>
    [Key]
    public virtual long Id { get; set; }

    /// <summary>
    /// Gets or sets the user id.
    /// </summary>
    /// <value>The assigned users id.</value>
    public virtual long UserId { get; set; }

    /// <summary>
    /// Gets or sets the user.
    /// [Association("UserRoleGrants", "UserId", "Id", IsForeignKey = false)]
    /// </summary>
    /// <value>The user who has been granted this operation.</value>
    [Include]
    [Association("UserToRoleAssociation", "UserId", "Id", IsForeignKey = true)]
    public virtual User User
    {
        get
        {
            return this.user;
        }

        set
        {
            this.user = value;

            if (value != null)
            {
                this.UserId = value.Id;
            }
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I think I may have just completely answered a question which wasn't asked. –  BenCr Mar 22 '11 at 14:12
    
I've read conflicting information on the Association attribute, is it nessecary to create the bridge class "UserRoleAssociation"? I made one to start with, but still see the property on the client side without and something I read seemed to suggest it wasn't required... This could be my missing peice! I'll try it now. –  Shaboboo Mar 22 '11 at 14:19
    
You might not need the attribute in EF, I'm working with NHibernate so it's definately required for associations. The reason I thought i'd come in with a wrong answer is that when I re-read the question i thought it asked how can you do Many to Many without a link entity. I think the answer is, it isn't possible. –  BenCr Mar 22 '11 at 14:32

Just ran across this: http://m2m4ria.codeplex.com/

It requires some setup, but exposes a view to the client which solves the whole many-to-many issue, without modifying your database or entity model. I found it very useful.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.