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I've got a problem sending a file to a serverside PHP-script using jQuery's ajax-function. It's possible to get the File-List with $('#fileinput').attr('files') but how is it possible to send this Data to the server? The resulting array ($_POST) on the serverside php-script is 0 (NULL) when using the file-input.

I know it is possible (though I didn't find any jQuery solutions until now, only Prototye code (http://webreflection.blogspot.com/2009/03/safari-4-multiple-upload-with-progress.html)).

This seems to be relatively new, so please do not mention file upload would be impossible via XHR/Ajax, because it's definitely working.

I need the functionality in Safari 5, FF and Chrome would be nice but are not essential.

My code for now is:

$.ajax({
    url: 'php/upload.php',
    data: $('#file').attr('files'),
    cache: false,
    contentType: 'multipart/form-data',
    processData: false,
    type: 'POST',
    success: function(data){
        alert(data);
    }
});
share|improve this question
7  
Please mark Raphael answer as correct. it is awesome! –  Kim Stacks Oct 5 '12 at 6:16
    
Sadly using FormData object doesn't works on IE<10. –  Alejandro Iglesias May 13 '13 at 16:52
    
@GarciaWebDev supposedly you can use a polyfill with Flash to support the same API. Check out github.com/Modernizr/Modernizr/wiki/… for more info. –  yuxhuang Jul 12 '13 at 4:09
    
Possible duplicate. –  Raphael Schweikert Mar 26 at 13:19

7 Answers 7

up vote 264 down vote accepted

With Safari 5/Firefox 4, it’s easiest to use the FormData class:

var data = new FormData();
jQuery.each($('#file')[0].files, function(i, file) {
    data.append('file-'+i, file);
});

So now you have a FormData object, ready to be sent along with the XMLHttpRequest.

$.ajax({
    url: 'php/upload.php',
    data: data,
    cache: false,
    contentType: false,
    processData: false,
    type: 'POST',
    success: function(data){
        alert(data);
    }
});

It’s imperative that you set the contentType option to false, forcing jQuery not to add a Content-Type header for you, otherwise, the boundary string will be missing from it. Also, you must leave the processData flag set to false, otherwise, jQuery will try to convert your FormData into a string, which will fail.

You may now retrieve the file in PHP using:

$_FILES['file-0']

(There is only one file, file-0, unless you specified the multiple attribute on your file input, in which case, the numbers will increment with each file.)

share|improve this answer
2  
Also, there is a FormData emulation which will make porting this solution to older browsers quite simple. All you have to do is to check for data.fake and set the contentType property manually as well as overriding xhr to use sendAsBinary(). –  Raphael Schweikert Aug 24 '11 at 8:01
    
Hi @Raphael Schwekert, we tried this, but it didn't seem to work (stackoverflow.com/questions/10215425/…). Where do you set the boundary for the multipart/form-data? –  Crashalot Apr 19 '12 at 1:07
2  
Could you elaborate on “didn't seem to work”? What exactly have you tried? The FormData emulation or the native class? When using the emulation, the boundary is in data.boundary so you’d add xhr: function() { var xhr = jQuery.ajaxSettings.xhr(); xhr.send = xhr.sendAsBinary; return xhr; }, to the options and use "multipart/form-data; boundary="+data.boundary for the contentType option. –  Raphael Schweikert Apr 19 '12 at 6:27
6  
So you’re neither using jQuery nor the FormData class and you’re asking me in the context of a question specific to jQuery and an answer specific to using FormData? I’m sorry but I don’t think I can help you there… –  Raphael Schweikert Apr 19 '12 at 9:44
1  
@RoyiNamir It’s only documented in code, I’m afraid. –  Raphael Schweikert Jan 6 at 18:30

Just wanted to add a bit to Raphael's great answer. Here's how to get PHP to produce the same $_FILES, regardless of whether you use JavaScript to submit.

HTML form:

<form enctype="multipart/form-data" action="/test.php" 
method="post" class="putImages">
   <input name="media[]" type="file" multiple/>
   <input class="button" type="submit" alt="Upload" value="Upload" />
</form>

PHP produces this $_FILES, when submitted without JavaScript:

Array
(
    [media] => Array
        (
            [name] => Array
                (
                    [0] => Galata_Tower.jpg
                    [1] => 518f.jpg
                )

            [type] => Array
                (
                    [0] => image/jpeg
                    [1] => image/jpeg
                )

            [tmp_name] => Array
                (
                    [0] => /tmp/phpIQaOYo
                    [1] => /tmp/phpJQaOYo
                )

            [error] => Array
                (
                    [0] => 0
                    [1] => 0
                )

            [size] => Array
                (
                    [0] => 258004
                    [1] => 127884
                )

        )

)

If you do progressive enhancement, using Raphael's JS to submit the files...

var data = new FormData($('input[name^="media"]'));     
jQuery.each($('input[name^="media"]')[0].files, function(i, file) {
    data.append(i, file);
});

$.ajax({
    type: ppiFormMethod,
    data: data,
    url: ppiFormActionURL,
    cache: false,
    contentType: false,
    processData: false,
    success: function(data){
        alert(data);
    }
});

... this is what PHP's $_FILES array looks like, after using that JavaScript to submit:

Array
(
    [0] => Array
        (
            [name] => Galata_Tower.jpg
            [type] => image/jpeg
            [tmp_name] => /tmp/phpAQaOYo
            [error] => 0
            [size] => 258004
        )

    [1] => Array
        (
            [name] => 518f.jpg
            [type] => image/jpeg
            [tmp_name] => /tmp/phpBQaOYo
            [error] => 0
            [size] => 127884
        )

)

That's a nice array, and actually what some people transform $_FILES into, but I find it's useful to work with the same $_FILES, regardless if JavaScript was used to submit. So, here are some minor changes to the JS:

// match anything not a [ or ]
regexp = /^[^[\]]+/;
var fileInput = $('.putImages input[type="file"]');
var fileInputName = regexp.exec( fileInput.attr('name') );

// make files available
var data = new FormData(fileInput);
jQuery.each($(fileInput)[0].files, function(i, file) {
    data.append(fileInputName+'['+i+']', file);
});

That code does two things.

  1. Retrieves the input name attribute automatically, making the HTML more maintainable. Now, as long as form has the class putImages, everything else is taken care of automatically. That is, the input need not have any special name.
  2. The array format that normal HTML submits is recreated by the JavaScript in the data.append line. Note the brackets.

With these changes, submitting with JavaScript now produces precisely the same $_FILES array as submitting with simple HTML.

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I've just build this function based on some info I read.

Use it like using .serialize(), instead just put .serializefiles();.
Working here in my tests.

//USAGE: $("#form").serializefiles();
(function($) {
$.fn.serializefiles = function() {
    var obj = $(this);
    /* ADD FILE TO PARAM AJAX */
    var formData = new FormData();
    $.each($(obj).find("input[type='file']"), function(i, tag) {
        $.each($(tag)[0].files, function(i, file) {
            formData.append(tag.name, file);
        });
    });
    var params = $(obj).serializeArray();
    $.each(params, function (i, val) {
        formData.append(val.name, val.value);
    });
    return formData;
};
})(jQuery);
share|improve this answer
1  
I was trying to get this working, but it seemed to not recognize serializefiles() as a function, despite this definition going at the top of the page. –  Fallenreaper Sep 19 '12 at 15:09
    
that works for me just fine. getting data with var data = $("#avatar-form").serializefiles(); sending this via ajax data parameter and analysing with express formidable: form.parse(req, function(err, fields, files){ thank you for that code snippet :) –  SchurigH Nov 19 '13 at 21:53

If your form is defined in your HTML, it is easier to pass the form into the constructor than it is to iterate and add images.

$('#my-form').submit( function(e) {
    e.preventDefault();

    var data = new FormData(this); // <-- 'this' is your form element

    $.ajax({
            url: '/my_URL/',
            data: data,
            cache: false,
            contentType: false,
            processData: false,
            type: 'POST',     
            success: function(data){
            ...
share|improve this answer

The FormData class does work, however in iOS Safari (on the iPhone at least) I wasn't able to use Raphael Schweikert's solution as is.

Mozilla Dev has a nice page on manipulating FormData objects.

So, add an empty form somewhere in your page, specifying the enctype:

<form enctype="multipart/form-data" method="post" name="fileinfo" id="fileinfo"></form>

Then, create FormData object as:

var data = new FormData($("#fileinfo"));

and proceed as in Raphael's code.

share|improve this answer
    
I had a problem with my jquery ajax uploads silently hanging in Safari and ended up doing a browser conditional $('form-name').submit() for Safari instead of the ajax upload that works in IE9 and FF18. Probably not an ideal solution for multi-uploads but I was doing this for a single file into an iframe from a jquery dialog so it worked ok. –  glyph Mar 1 '13 at 21:17

As an alternative to AJAX, you could add a hidden iframe in your document, copy your form there and post it (so that no redirection occurs in your visible page). I guess you could delete the iframe afterwards.

(HTML and JS are technologies for hackers, not for programmers. You will have to hack your way out of this... It's been... God knows how many year of patching and 'evolving' JS and HTML and you still can't do something so simple without using external libs. I'm sick of it. (I know about HTML5, just it's not enough and not widely supported))

share|improve this answer
  1. get form object by jquery-> $("#id")[0]
  2. data = new FormData($("#id")[0]);
  3. ok,data is your want
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