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In my Rails 3 project I have a list of routes like this:

resources :projects do
    resources :studies
end

resources :sticky_notes
resources :study_templates

...

Currently by default the ids in the URLs from these routes can be called with params[:id], but I want to be able to call them with params[:sticky_note_id], params[:study_template_id], params[:study_id], etc. Is there a way I can specify the parameter name for the ID of these projects? Do I have to write each route out manually without 'resources'?

Thanks!

Edit: Here's an example of what i'm trying to do: This is what happens when the routes are defined as written above:

resources :projects do
    resources :studies
end
# results in /projects/:project_id/studies/:id
# /projects/:project_id/studies/:id/edit
# /projects/:project_id/studies/:id/new
# etc.

resources :sticky_notes
# results in /sticky_notes/:id
# /sticky_notes/:id/edit
# /sticky_notes/:id/new
# etc.

This is what I want:

match '/projects/:project_id/studies/:study_id' => 'studies#show'
match '/projects/:project_id/studies/:study_id/edit' => 'studies#edit'
match '/projects/:project_id/studies/:study_id/new' => 'studies#new'
...

# results in /projects/:project_id/studies/:study_id
# /projects/:project_id/studies/:study_id/edit
# etc

match '/sticky_notes/:sticky_note_id' => 'sticky_notes#show'
match '/sticky_notes/:sticky_note_id/edit' => 'sticky_notes#edit'
match '/sticky_notes/:sticky_note_id/new' => 'sticky_notes#new'
...

# results in /sticky_notes/:sticky_note_id
# /sticky_notes/:sticky_note_id/edit
# etc

I want the second part, but without all that work on my already-huge routes file. :) is it possible?

share|improve this question
1  
Just out of curiosity: Why do you want to do that? What's the upside? – Wukerplank Mar 22 '11 at 14:21
1  
I have a lot of nested routes, and pages that can also be accessed without the nested routes (i.e. there is projects/X/studies/Y and also studies/Y). one of the issues is I'm trying to create a universal "note" system that stores notes based on the parameters in the URL (study_id, project_id, etc). this would be much easier to do if I could specify the id name universally rather than always testing if params[:study_id].nil?, if so use params[:id], if not use [:study_id], and so on. – snacks Mar 22 '11 at 14:28
    
If it would make sense to have routes for both projects/:project_id/studies/:id and projects/:project_id/studies/:study_id I would do both, I just don't know if there's a simple way other than writing out all the routes (ugh) – snacks Mar 22 '11 at 14:29
1  
I see! Controllers can become quite crowded that way. I have the same problem on some projects. Let's hope for a good answer :) – Wukerplank Mar 22 '11 at 14:30
    
If it would make sense to have routes for both projects/:project_id/studies/:id and projects/:project_id/studies/:study_id I would do both. Route projects/:project_id/studies/:id is just a matcher and both params[:id] and params[:study_id] would match. So, if you will write both of them, only that which on top would work. It isn't a routes problem, but controller. You should provide an :id, and e.g. :type. – Oleksandr Skrypnyk Jan 26 '12 at 8:54
up vote 0 down vote accepted

after all 'routes.rb' is just a simple ruby file, so why not use ruby code and maybe even make a method to generate the necessary routes .. lets have a look at a simple example using an array of resources, if you want to use nested resources you might want to modify the method to use hash-chains in order to pass the resources you want to add a member:

def add_nested_resource(toadd=nil, controller=nil, resources=[])
  return if toadd.nil? || controller.nil? || ressources.empty?
  resources.each { |x|
    resources x do
      resources toadd, :controller => controller
    end
  }
end

add_nested_resource(:notes, "notes", [:resource1, :resource2, ..., :resourceX]

would be equivalent to

resources :resource1 do
  resources :notes, :controller => "notes"
end
resources :resource2 do
  resources :notes, :controller => "notes"
end
.
.
.
resources :resourceX do
  resources :notes, :controller => "notes"
end

That way you could simply write a lot of routes with few effort. Within the notes_controller of course you might have to distinguish which resource has called on it, I usually add a hidden field in the according forms where I leave a 'classified' name of the object that nests the nested object ... like

<%= form_for ... someform for resource1... do |f| %> 
 ...
 <%= hidden_field_tag :nesting_object, "Resource1" %>
 ...
<% end %>

Hope this helps you through your trouble...

share|improve this answer
2  
well you can of course write a method to generate the routes. that would naturally mean you'd have to setup a hash/array sort of container to define what you want to generate ... which again might be a lot of work. other than that, only metaprogramming comes to mind. I mean in ruby you always can reopen a class and overwrite a method. So the best way to get this done would probably to reopen the class that is responsible for setting the routes and overwrite the method to use ":#{object.singularize}_id" for the route generation wherever it by default uses ":id" shrug no clue where that is... – Ingo Mar 22 '11 at 20:38
    
These are some interesting ideas, thanks! – snacks Mar 23 '11 at 15:49

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