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I need to genarate a random number with exactly 6 digits in Java. I know i could loop 6 times over a randomicer but is there a nother way to do this in the standard Java SE ?

EDIT: Follow up question: Now that I can generate my 6 digits i got a new problem, the whole ID I'm trying to create is of the syntax 123456-A1B45. So how do i randomice the last 5 chars that can be either A-Z or 0-9? I'm thinking of using the char value and randomice a number between 48 - 90 and simply drop any value that gets the numbers that represent 58-64. Is this the way to go or is there a better solution?

EDIT 2: This is my final solution. Thanks for all the help guys!

protected String createRandomRegistryId(String handleId)
{
    // syntax we would like to generate is DIA123456-A1B34      
    String val = "DI";      

    // char (1), random A-Z
    int ranChar = 65 + (new Random()).nextInt(90-65);
    char ch = (char)ranChar;        
    val += ch;      

    // numbers (6), random 0-9
    Random r = new Random();
    int numbers = 100000 + (int)(r.nextFloat() * 899900);
    val += String.valueOf(numbers);

    val += "-";
    // char or numbers (5), random 0-9 A-Z
    for(int i = 0; i<6;){
        int ranAny = 48 + (new Random()).nextInt(90-65);

        if(!(57 < ranAny && ranAny<= 65)){
        char c = (char)ranAny;      
        val += c;
        i++;
        }

    }

    return val;
}
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marked as duplicate by fglez, Shikiryu, gaige, Roman C, Sébastien Renauld Apr 11 '13 at 11:09

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
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8 Answers 8

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Generate a number in the range from 100000 to 999999.

// pseudo code
int n = 100000 + random_float() * 900000;

I’m pretty sure you have already read the documentation for e.g. Random and can figure out the rest yourself.

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2  
what is random_float() ?? –  Jigar Joshi Mar 22 '11 at 14:25
    
Arbitrary method that returns a random float. Random.nextFloat for instance. –  aioobe Mar 22 '11 at 14:25
    
random_float() is a pseudo-code function (i.e. it does not exist) that returns a random floating-point number between 0 (inclusive) and 1 (exclusive). –  Bombe Mar 22 '11 at 14:26
    
Thank you this worked great! Got any solution for my follow up q also? –  Marthin Mar 22 '11 at 14:43
    
@Marthin, I updated my answer. –  aioobe Mar 22 '11 at 15:03
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[...] is there a nother way to do this in the standard Java SE ?

Yes. Using Random and nextInt should do the trick:

Random rnd = new Random();
int n = 100000 + rnd.nextInt(900000);

Note that n will never equal 100000 + 900000 = 1000000 since the nextInt(900000) returns a number between 0 (inclusive) and 900000 (exclusive).


So how do i randomice the last 5 chars that can be either A-Z or 0-9?

Here's a fairly efficient and easy-to-understand solution:

char[] alphNum = "ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ0123456789".toCharArray();

Random rnd = new Random();

StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder((100000 + rnd.nextInt(900000)) + "-");
for (int i = 0; i < 5; i++)
    sb.append(alphNum[rnd.nextInt(alphNum.length)]);

String id = sb.toString();

System.out.println(id);
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int n = 100000 + rnd.nextInt(900000); it can go beyond outer limit –  Jigar Joshi Mar 22 '11 at 14:23
    
@org.life.java, how? –  aioobe Mar 22 '11 at 14:24
    
What “outer limit?” If you are referring to the 6-digit range: no, it can not. –  Bombe Mar 22 '11 at 14:24
    
ah......... misread the Q. I assumed OP needs random no between 10000-900000 –  Jigar Joshi Mar 22 '11 at 14:28
    
Thanks for the help, i almost did the same thing for the last 5 chars. –  Marthin Mar 23 '11 at 10:31
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try this:

public int getRandomNumber(int min, int max) {
    return (int) Math.floor(Math.random() * (max - min + 1)) + min;
}
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If you need to specify the exact charactor length, we have to avoid values with 0 in-front.

Final String representation must have that exact character length.

String GenerateRandomNumber(int charLength) {
        return String.valueOf(charLength < 1 ? 0 : new Random()
                .nextInt((9 * (int) Math.pow(10, charLength - 1)) - 1)
                + (int) Math.pow(10, charLength - 1));
    }
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int rand = (new Random()).getNextInt(900000) + 100000;

EDIT: Fixed off-by-1 error and removed invalid solution.

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2  
Yay, off-by-1!​ –  Bombe Mar 22 '11 at 14:23
    
Mod a huge number by 899999 won't necessarily result in a uniform randomization. –  aioobe Mar 22 '11 at 14:27
    
Yeah, that's embarrassing. –  T.K. Mar 22 '11 at 14:28
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for the follow up question you can get a number between 36^5 and 36^6 and convert it in base 36

UPDATED:

using this code

http://javaconfessions.com/2008/09/convert-between-base-10-and-base-62-in_28.html

It's written BaseConverterUtil.toBase36(60466176+r.nextInt(2116316160))

but in your use case it can be optimized by using a StringBuilder and having the number in the reverse order ie 71 should be converted in Z1 instead of 1Z

EDITED:

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Thanks for yore answer but I'm not sure how you mean? Coudl you please explain a bit more? –  Marthin Mar 22 '11 at 15:22
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Generate a random number (which is always between 0-1) and multiply by 1000000

Math.round(Math.random()*1000000);
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Would that work for you?

public class Main {

public static void main(String[] args) {
    Random r = new Random(System.currentTimeMillis());
    System.out.println(r.nextInt(100000) * 0.000001);
}

}

result e.g. 0.019007

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seems I was a little bit late :) –  idefix Mar 22 '11 at 14:26
    
You can skip the argument to currentTimeMillis. The Random() constructor has a better approach. –  aioobe Mar 22 '11 at 14:35
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