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I have a major issue with one of my queries:

SELECT tpostime, gispoint 
FROM mytable 
WHERE idterminal = 233463 
ORDER BY idpos DESC

When idterminal does not exist in 'mytable' then this query is being processed forever, and then I'm presented with timeout (well 'canceling statement due to user request' message to be specific), but when I remove the order by clause, everything seems fine. Now I'm wondering - idpos is primary key for 'mytable', therefore it's indexed so ordering by it should be fast, I guess. And what's important - 'mytable' weights 3gb.

Table and index definitions:

CREATE TABLE mytable ( 
  idpos serial NOT NULL, 
  tpostime timestamp(0) without time zone, 
  idterminal integer DEFAULT 0, 
  gispoint geometry, 
  idtracks integer, 
  CONSTRAINT mytable_pkey PRIMARY KEY (idpos), 
  CONSTRAINT qwe FOREIGN KEY (idtracks) REFERENCES qwe (idtracks) 
    MATCH SIMPLE ON UPDATE NO ACTION ON DELETE CASCADE, 
  CONSTRAINT abc FOREIGN KEY (idterminal) REFERENCES abc (idterminal)
    MATCH SIMPLE ON UPDATE NO ACTION ON DELETE CASCADE, 
  CONSTRAINT enforce_geotype_gispoint 
    CHECK (geometrytype(gispoint)= 'POINT'::text OR gispoint IS NULL), 
  CONSTRAINT enforce_srid_gispoint CHECK (srid(gispoint) = 4326)
) WITH OIDS; 

CREATE INDEX idx_idterminal ON mytable USING btree (idterminal); 
CREATE INDEX idx_idtracks ON mytable USING btree (idtracks); 
CREATE INDEX idx_idtracks_idterminal ON mytable USING btree (idtracks, idterminal);
share|improve this question
    
Run explain analyze select ... to get details on where the time is spent. Then post the result –  a_horse_with_no_name Mar 22 '11 at 14:41
1  
Try explain select ... as explain analyze select ... will also likely be 'processed forever' –  Jack Douglas Mar 22 '11 at 14:46
    
Here are the results from explain select: "Limit (cost=0.00..240.64 rows=1 width=37)" " -> Index Scan Backward using mytable_pkey on mytable (cost=0.00..2605896.07 rows=10829 width=37)" " Filter: (idterminal = 233463)" –  marek Mar 22 '11 at 14:49
    
That means it is not using whatever index you have on idterminal. I think it would be good to see the other indexes on the table - can you post the result of \d mytable in psql? –  Jack Douglas Mar 22 '11 at 14:51
    
That is it'e schema: –  marek Mar 22 '11 at 15:01

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

It looks to me like the selectivity of idterminal is low enough for postgres to choose a full scan of mytable_pkey rather than the cost of ordering all the rows with idterminal = 233463

I suggest:

CREATE INDEX idx_idterminal2 ON mytable USING btree (idterminal, idpos);

and perhaps:

DROP INDEX idx_idterminal;

You don't mention if this is a production database or not - if it is of course you will need to test the impact of the change first elsewhere.

If you prefer not to change the schema you might like to try and trick the optimizer into the path you know is best with something like (not tested) for 8.4 and above:

SELECT * 
FROM ( SELECT tpostime, gispoint, idpos, row_number() over (order by 1)
       FROM mytable 
       WHERE idterminal = 233463 )
ORDER BY idpos DESC;

or perhaps just:

SELECT * 
FROM ( SELECT tpostime, gispoint, idpos
       FROM mytable 
       WHERE idterminal = 233463
       GROUP BY tpostime, gispoint, idpos )
ORDER BY idpos DESC;

or even:

SELECT tpostime, gispoint 
FROM mytable 
WHERE idterminal = 233463 
ORDER BY idpos*2 DESC
share|improve this answer
    
Setting index on idpos, idterminal worked just fine, but I was wondering if you'd be so kind and tell me how do I make this query above work (I don't have function called row_number() in my pg db, and pgadmin shows me errors when I'm using the word over. –  marek Mar 22 '11 at 16:14
    
@marek do you mean idterminal, idpos? What's your version of postgres - windowing functions are 8.4 and above. There are other tricks you could try depending on your version –  Jack Douglas Mar 22 '11 at 18:21
    
My pg version is 8.1, and yes - I meant I set compound index on idterminal and idpos. –  marek Mar 23 '11 at 8:37
    
@marek can you try explain select ... using the second/third SQL above and post the result? –  Jack Douglas Mar 23 '11 at 12:55
    
8.1 ?????????? There's been a huge quantity of added features, performance boosts and bug fixes since then... you should really upgrade... –  peufeu May 4 '11 at 8:48

Do you have an index on idterminal? Try adding a composite index with both (idpos, idterminal). What is probably happening if you do the explain plan, is it is ordering by idpos first, then scanning to find idterminal.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, idterminal is indexed. I'll try your advice about composite index, but first I'll run explain analyze select as a_horse_with_no_name suggested above –  marek Mar 22 '11 at 14:44
    
if anything you want (idterminal, idpos) - but that is only going to be a good thing to do if the selectivity of idterminal is low –  Jack Douglas Mar 22 '11 at 14:50

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