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I use shared_ptr in my application design, and I have tendency that more and more objects become heap-allocated instead of to be a simple objects on stack (or agregates of more complex objects).
Instead of simple (but with risk that Foo::bar will become dangling reference in more complex situation) ...

struct Bar { };
struct Foo { Foo(Bar& bar) : bar(bar) { }; Bar& bar; };
int main() {
  Bar bar;
  Foo foo(bar);
  // ...
}
... I need to do ...
struct Bar { };
struct Foo { Foo(shared_ptr bar) : bar(bar) { }; shared_ptr<Bar> bar; };
int main() {
  shared_ptr<Bar> bar = make_shared<Bar>();
  Foo foo(bar);
  // ...
}
... because I want to avoid of manual objects life-time tracking
Did I missed point in shared_ptr usage or this is pay for automatic life-time management ? Or maybe this is bad design sign ?

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shared_ptr should be used sparingly. The life-cycle of a given object is an integral part of the functional behavior. If you don't have a clear specification of the behavior, you won't get anywhere... and if you do, then you don't need to use shared_ptr everywhere. It's no panacea, or silver bullet, and at one point you'll realize that you're leaking memory like crazy because you have cycles of references, and no idea where to start because your collaboration diagram is a mess :/ –  Matthieu M. Mar 22 '11 at 14:53
    
What is your point? You wanted to work with shared_ptr and now you are. Since main() is an owner, he should have a shared_ptr. Using shared_ptr is more verbuous than using references. –  stefaanv Mar 22 '11 at 14:56
    
@Matthieu: when considering owners (shared_ptr) and users (weak_ptr) and using a layered approach, shared_ptr can really help you. With no design you're just replacing possible dangling pointers with possible memory leaks –  stefaanv Mar 22 '11 at 15:00
1  
@vnw: no there's nothing wrong with the first approach. When passing a reference, it is clear that the caller remains owner of bar, when passing a shared_ptr, both become owner, when passing an auto_ptr, the ownership would be transferred. However, when passing a raw pointer, it must be documented who is the intended owner, because that is not clear. –  stefaanv Mar 22 '11 at 15:38
1  
@vnm: about weak_ptr: yes, owners must get a shared_ptr, users must get a weak_ptr and lock whenever needed. Owners and users must be defined at design time –  stefaanv Mar 22 '11 at 15:40

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It is a question of your object life cycle. You should use shared_ptr when you really share an object between multiple other objects.

In your case the owner of FOO and BAR must control the lifecycle of both. Maybe it is possible to make BAR a private member of you class FOO and let FOO control the life cycle.

I personally use the smart pointers to express the ownership of an object. Shared_ptr means that it is really shared and I am not the only owner of this object. Scoped or unique pointer show that I am the only owner of the object. If you want to transfer the ownership you can use auto_ptr or the C++0x move semantics.

I have seen at least in bigger projects that the lack of life cycle control will lead to dangling objects. So you don't have a direct memory leak any longer because of automatic life-time management but you get circular dependencies. Which lead to the same result.

To answer your question if this is bad design. It depends on what you are doing.

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It is a sign of bad design. shared_ptr exists for when your objects must be heap allocated. You should never additionally allocate anything on the heap just because you can use shared_ptr. The stack is still the best choice by miles.

You need to know before you start deciding how you're going to implement it, what objects need to go on the heap and which need to go on the stack, and what the ownership is. Then you can use shared_ptr as an implementation tool.

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What if some class A controls lifefime of B, and C, controlled by someone other need pointer to B ? Should I use shared_ptr in this situation or, again, this is bad design ? –  cybevnm Mar 22 '11 at 15:14
    
@vnm: You can force shared_ptr as patches to a bad design, but the real solution requires thinking. You need to think whether A is responsible of B and C, and at the same time, whether that someone else should hold a reference to B (seemingly an internal detail of A) if A can be destructed before that last object. In some cases you will find that B is not owned by A, but rather shared by A and D, and that is a hint that you want to convert that to a pointer (smart pointer). In other situations it will be owned by A and D might still hold a reference... –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Mar 22 '11 at 15:45

Have you tried working on values instead of pointers ?

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No. I can't do this because pointee should be shared among several objects –  cybevnm Mar 22 '11 at 15:05

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