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I want to get a list of: Sides of Right Triangle

which are perfectly whole numbers.(where each sides less than 100)

Example:

//I want these combination to be printed 
3, 4, 5
6, 8, 10                    |'.
5, 12, 13               12  |  '.    13   (Figure is just Example)
.                           |    '.
.                           |______'.
.                               5


// I don't want these
1, 1, 1.414....            |'.
.                        1 |  '.    √ˉ2  = 1.414.... (Figure is just Example)
.                          |    '.
                           |______'.
                               1

Update:

I do like this: But this is very heavy code(regarding optimization)

for(int i=1;i<100;i++)
{
     for(int j=1;j<100;j++)
     {
         for(int k=1;k<100;k++)
         {
           if(i*i + j*j == k*k)
           { 
                //print i, j, k
           } 
         }         

     }

}
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9  
What have you tried so far? You don't expect us to do your homework, do you? –  R. Martinho Fernandes Mar 22 '11 at 14:57
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6 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted
// Obvious min is 1, obvious max is 99.
for(int i = 1; i != 100; ++i)
{
  // There's no point going beyond the lowest number that gives an answer higher than 100
  int max = 100 * 100 - i * i;
  // There's no point starting lower than our current first side, or we'll repeat results we already found.
  for(int j = i; j * j <= max; ++j)
  {
    // Find the square of the hypotenuse
    int sqr = i * i + j * j;
    // We could have a double and do hyp == Math.Round(hyp), but lets avoid rounding error-based false positives.
    int hyp = (int)Math.Sqrt(sqr);
    if(hyp * hyp == sqr)
    {
      Console.WriteLine(i + ", " + j + ", " + hyp);
      // If we want to e.g. have not just "3, 4, 5" but also "4, 3, 5", then
      // we can also here do
      // Console.WriteLine(j + ", " + i + ", " + hyp);
    }
  }
}
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1  
The second loop should probably just be for(int j = i; j <= 100-i; ++j) since all three sides must be less than 100 -- your current loop will check pairs like 99,14. –  Whatsit Mar 22 '11 at 15:36
1  
@Whatsit It won't check for the pair {99, 14} as after i = 70, j = 71 no i meets the condition of j * j <= max. It will check for {14, 99} as it should (14 * 14 + 99 * 99 < 100 * 100). Your suggestion would miss the pair 65, 72 as 72 > 100 - 65, and so miss a correct result. –  Jon Hanna Mar 22 '11 at 15:56
    
Yes you're right, I'm getting my triangle properties mixed up. –  Whatsit Mar 22 '11 at 19:04
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What you're looking for are the Pythagorean triples.

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I've used this formula in C# for generating Pythagorean triples in the past. But there are many other options on that page.

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You can improve your code by removing the innermost loop if you take advantage of the fact that for each pair of catheti, there is only one possible value for the hypotenuse. Instead of looping around to find that value, you can compute it using the Pythagorean theorem and test if it is an whole number.

Something like:

// compute the hypotenuse
var hypotenuse = Math.Sqrt(i*i + j*j);
// test if the hypotenuse is a whole number < 100
if(hypotenuse < 100 && hypotenuse == (int)hypotenuse)
{
     // here's one!
}

Some other improvements you can do include:

  • Once you've checked a pair of catheti (x,y), don't check for (y,x) again;
  • Once you find a triangle (x,y,z), you can include all triangles with the same sides multiplied by a constant factor (k*x, k*y, k*z), i.e, if you find (3,4,5) you can include (6,8,10), (9,12,15), (12,16,20), etc (this one might be a too much effort for little gains);
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3  
Well he does, as noted in his example: √2 = 1.414... –  Groovetrain Mar 22 '11 at 14:58
    
@Javed: I changed my answer to reflect your edit. Does this help? –  R. Martinho Fernandes Mar 22 '11 at 15:27
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A fairly good exhaustive search:

for(i=1;i<100;i++) {
    k=i;
    for(j=1;k<100;j++) {
        while(i*i+j*j<k*k) {
            k++;
        }
        if(i*i+j*j==k*k) {
            printf("%d %d %d", i, j, k);
        }
    }
}
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2  
"To do it as efficiently as possible:" That's a joke right? –  Yuriy Faktorovich Mar 22 '11 at 15:02
    
Bad choice of wording. As far as I know that's close to the cleanest way of doing an exhaustive search. –  zebediah49 Mar 22 '11 at 15:03
    
exhaustive search is a bad way to handle this problem unless you need relatively few triples. –  Yuriy Faktorovich Mar 22 '11 at 15:05
    
"(where each sides less than 100)" sounds like relatively few to me. –  zebediah49 Mar 22 '11 at 15:06
1  
You're right. But it also says C# and your code doesn't actually work. –  Yuriy Faktorovich Mar 22 '11 at 15:08
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In a declarative language (Mathematica):

FindInstance[x^2 + y^2==z^2 &&1<=z<=100 && 1<=y<=x<=100, {x, y, z}, Integers,100]
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