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I have some fragments that need to show a regular dialog. On these dialogs the user can choose a yes/no answer, and then the fragment should behave accordingly.

Now, the Fragment class doesn't have an onCreateDialog() method to override, so I guess I have to implement the dialogs outside, in the containing Activity. It's ok, but then the Activity needs to report back the chosen answer somehow to the fragment. I could of course use a callback pattern here, so the fragment registers itself at the Activity with a listener class, and the Activity would report back the answer thru that, or something like that.

But this seems to be quite a big mess for a simple task as displaying a damn yes-no dialog in a fragment. Also, this way my Fragment would be less self-contained.

Is there some cleaner way to do this?

Edit:

The answer to this question doesn't really explain in detail how one should use DialogFragments to display dialogs from Fragments. So AFAIK, the way to go is:

  1. Display a Fragment.
  2. When needed, instantiate a DialogFragment.
  3. Set the original Fragment as the target of this DialogFragment, with .setTargetFragment().
  4. Show the DialogFragment with .show() from the original Fragment.
  5. When the user chooses some option on this DialogFragment, notify the original Fragment about this selection (e.g. the user clicked 'yes'), you can get the reference of the original Fragment with .getTarget().
  6. Dismiss the DialogFragment.
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1  
Your technique works, except when a screen rotation occurs. I get a force close then. Any ideas? – Weston Nov 22 '11 at 22:16
    
@Weston check out the first answer by Zsombor: stackoverflow.com/questions/8235080/… – EverythingTech96 Aug 31 '12 at 21:01
up vote 29 down vote accepted

You should use a DialogFragment instead.

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7  
Unfortunately this approach is a bit more verbose than the classic managed dialogs approach of previous Android revisions, but it is now the preferred method. You can avoid referencing the Activity entirely by using the putFragment and getFragment methods of FragmentManager, allowing the DialogFragment to report back directly to the calling fragment (even after orientation changes). – Dave Jun 28 '11 at 12:25
    
What if you have a ListFragment that needs to display Dialogs, can't extend them both – marchinram Aug 11 '11 at 0:17
14  
The ListFragment subclass would use DialogFragments by instantiating new ones, not by subclassing DialogFragment. (A DialogFragment is a dialog implemented as a Fragment, not a Fragment which may display Dialogs.) – nmr Sep 1 '11 at 22:07

I must cautiously doubt the previously accepted answer that using a DialogFragment is the best option. The intended (primary) purpose of the DialogFragment seems to be to display fragments that are dialogs themselves, not to display fragments that have dialogs to display.

I believe that using the fragment's activity to mediate between the dialog and the fragment is the preferable option.

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10  
Since the managed dialogs (onCreateDialog) approach is soon to be deprecated, I'd disagree and say that DialogFragment is indeed the way to go. – Dave Jun 28 '11 at 12:22
2  
Accepted answer means use a DialogFragment instead of a Dialog, not instead of a ListFragment, AFAICS. – nmr Sep 1 '11 at 22:04
    
Actually a dialog fragment can be used as both a dialog and a normal fragment - see embedding developer.android.com/reference/android/app/DialogFragment.html – Clive Jefferies Feb 14 '14 at 15:08

Here is a full example of a yes/no DialogFragment:

The class:

public class SomeDialog extends DialogFragment {

    @Override
    public Dialog onCreateDialog(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
        return new AlertDialog.Builder(getActivity())
            .setTitle("Title")
            .setMessage("Sure you wanna do this!")
            .setNegativeButton(android.R.string.no, new OnClickListener() {
                @Override
                public void onClick(DialogInterface dialog, int which) {
                    // do nothing (will close dialog)
                }
            })
            .setPositiveButton(android.R.string.yes,  new OnClickListener() {
                @Override
                public void onClick(DialogInterface dialog, int which) {
                    // do something
                }
            })
            .create();
    }
}

To start dialog:

        FragmentTransaction ft = getSupportFragmentManager().beginTransaction();
        // Create and show the dialog.
        SomeDialog newFragment = new SomeDialog ();
        newFragment.show(ft, "dialog");

You could also let the class implement onClickListener and use that instead of embedded listeners.

Callback to Activity

If you want to implement callback this is how it is done In your activity:

YourActivity extends Activity implements OnFragmentClickListener

and

@Override
public void onFragmentClick(int action, Object object) {
    switch(action) {
        case SOME_ACTION:
        //Do your action here
        break;
    }
}

The callback class:

public interface OnFragmentClickListener {
    public void onFragmentClick(int action, Object object);
}

Then to perform a callback from a fragment you need to make sure the listener is attached like this:

@Override
public void onAttach(Activity activity) {
    super.onAttach(activity);
    try {
        mListener = (OnFragmentClickListener) activity;
    } catch (ClassCastException e) {
        throw new ClassCastException(activity.toString() + " must implement listeners!");
    }
}

And a callback is performed like this:

mListener.onFragmentClick(SOME_ACTION, null); // null or some important object as second parameter.
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2  
This does not explain how to start it from a Fragment – akohout Jan 28 '14 at 11:47
    
@raveN you'd simply make a callback to your activity which then would start the fragment. – Warpzit Jan 28 '14 at 12:43
    
@Warpzit Thank you for the comprehensive answer. I dread touching the FragmentManager, which I'm already doing ungodly things with... How I can pass onClick events back to the (non-Dialog)Fragment which needed user input? BTW, shouldn't the transaction be added to backstack? – kaay Jul 8 '14 at 12:57
    
@kaay from the activity you can call any public method in the given fragment that needs the new input. From there it should be pretty easy updating with the new content. – Warpzit Jul 9 '14 at 13:26
1  
@RichardLeMesurier Indeed, fragments are ups and downs. – Warpzit Sep 15 '14 at 11:29

For me, it was the following-

MyFragment:

public class MyFragment extends Fragment implements MyDialog.Callback
{
    ShowDialog activity_showDialog;

    @Override
    public void onAttach(Activity activity)
    {
        super.onAttach(activity);
        try
        {
            activity_showDialog = (ShowDialog)activity;
        }
        catch(ClassCastException e)
        {
            Log.e(this.getClass().getSimpleName(), "ShowDialog interface needs to be     implemented by Activity.", e);
            throw e;
        }
    }

    @Override
    public void onClick(View view) 
    {
        ...
        MyDialog dialog = new MyDialog();
        dialog.setTargetFragment(this, 1); //request code
        activity_showDialog.showDialog(dialog);
        ...
    }

    @Override
    public void accept()
    {
        //accept
    }

    @Override
    public void decline()
    {
        //decline
    }

    @Override
    public void cancel()
    {
        //cancel
    }

}

MyDialog:

public class MyDialog extends DialogFragment implements View.OnClickListener
{
    private EditText mEditText;
    private Button acceptButton;
    private Button rejectButton;
    private Button cancelButton;

    public static interface Callback
    {
        public void accept();
        public void decline();
        public void cancel();
    }

    public MyDialog()
    {
        // Empty constructor required for DialogFragment
    }

    @Override
    public View onCreateView(LayoutInflater inflater, ViewGroup container, Bundle savedInstanceState)
    {
        View view = inflater.inflate(R.layout.dialogfragment, container);
        acceptButton = (Button) view.findViewById(R.id.dialogfragment_acceptbtn);
        rejectButton = (Button) view.findViewById(R.id.dialogfragment_rejectbtn);
        cancelButton = (Button) view.findViewById(R.id.dialogfragment_cancelbtn);
        acceptButton.setOnClickListener(this);
        rejectButton.setOnClickListener(this);
        cancelButton.setOnClickListener(this);
        getDialog().setTitle(R.string.dialog_title);
        return view;
    }

    @Override
    public void onClick(View v)
    {
        Callback callback = null;
        try
        {
            callback = (Callback) getTargetFragment();
        }
        catch (ClassCastException e)
        {
            Log.e(this.getClass().getSimpleName(), "Callback of this class must be implemented by target fragment!", e);
            throw e;
        }

        if (callback != null)
        {
            if (v == acceptButton)
            {   
                callback.accept();
                this.dismiss();
            }
            else if (v == rejectButton)
            {
                callback.decline();
                this.dismiss();
            }
            else if (v == cancelButton)
            {
                callback.cancel();
                this.dismiss();
            }
        }
    }
}

Activity:

public class MyActivity extends ActionBarActivity implements ShowDialog
{
    ..

    @Override
    public void showDialog(DialogFragment dialogFragment)
    {
        FragmentManager fragmentManager = getSupportFragmentManager();
        dialogFragment.show(fragmentManager, "dialog");
    }
}

DialogFragment layout:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<RelativeLayout xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android"
    android:layout_width="wrap_content"
    android:layout_height="wrap_content"
    android:layout_gravity="center"
    android:orientation="vertical" >

    <TextView
        android:id="@+id/dialogfragment_textview"
        android:layout_width="wrap_content"
        android:layout_height="wrap_content"
        android:layout_marginTop="20dp"
        android:layout_centerHorizontal="true"
        android:layout_marginBottom="10dp"
        android:text="@string/example"/>

    <Button
        android:id="@+id/dialogfragment_acceptbtn"
        android:layout_width="200dp"
        android:layout_height="wrap_content"
        android:layout_marginTop="20dp"
        android:layout_centerHorizontal="true"
        android:layout_below="@+id/dialogfragment_textview"
        android:text="@string/accept"
        />

    <Button
        android:id="@+id/dialogfragment_rejectbtn"
        android:layout_width="200dp"
        android:layout_height="wrap_content"
        android:layout_marginTop="10dp"
        android:layout_alignLeft="@+id/dialogfragment_acceptbtn"
        android:layout_below="@+id/dialogfragment_acceptbtn"
        android:text="@string/decline" />

     <Button
        android:id="@+id/dialogfragment_cancelbtn"
        android:layout_width="200dp"
        android:layout_height="wrap_content"
        android:layout_marginTop="10dp"
        android:layout_marginBottom="20dp"
        android:layout_alignLeft="@+id/dialogfragment_rejectbtn"
        android:layout_below="@+id/dialogfragment_rejectbtn"
        android:text="@string/cancel" />

     <Button
        android:id="@+id/dialogfragment_heightfixhiddenbtn"
        android:layout_width="200dp"
        android:layout_height="20dp"
        android:layout_marginTop="10dp"
        android:layout_marginBottom="20dp"
        android:layout_alignLeft="@+id/dialogfragment_cancelbtn"
        android:layout_below="@+id/dialogfragment_cancelbtn"
        android:background="@android:color/transparent"
        android:enabled="false"
        android:text=" " />
</RelativeLayout>

As the name dialogfragment_heightfixhiddenbtn shows, I just couldn't figure out a way to fix that the bottom button's height was cut in half despite saying wrap_content, so I added a hidden button to be "cut" in half instead. Sorry for the hack.

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1  
+1 the reference set with setTargetFragment() is recreated correctly by the system when it restarts the Activity/Fragment set after rotation. So the reference will point to the new target automatically. – Richard Le Mesurier Sep 15 '14 at 9:55
    
I'd punch myself in the nose now for not using ButterKnife back in the day, though. Use ButterKnife, it makes your view handling much prettier. – EpicPandaForce Nov 28 '14 at 0:22
    
And you can use Otto to send event from Fragment to Activity, so that you don't need the interface attach magic. Otto example here: stackoverflow.com/a/28480952/2413303 – EpicPandaForce Mar 4 '15 at 18:48
 public void showAlert(){


     AlertDialog.Builder alertDialog = new AlertDialog.Builder(getActivity());
     LayoutInflater inflater = getActivity().getLayoutInflater();
     View alertDialogView = inflater.inflate(R.layout.test_dialog, null);
     alertDialog.setView(alertDialogView);

     TextView textDialog = (TextView) alertDialogView.findViewById(R.id.text_testDialogMsg);
     textDialog.setText(questionMissing);

     alertDialog.setPositiveButton("Ok", new DialogInterface.OnClickListener() {
         public void onClick(DialogInterface dialog, int which) {
             dialog.cancel();
         }
     });
     alertDialog.show();

}

where .test_dialog is of xml custom

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