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I would like to use atomic variables in C.

I tried the following suggested builtin functions in gcc but I received a link error undefined reference to `_sync_fetch_and_add'.

  type __sync_fetch_and_add (type *ptr, type value);
  type __sync_fetch_and_sub (type *ptr, type value);
  type __sync_fetch_and_or (type *ptr, type value);
  type __sync_fetch_and_and (type *ptr, type value);
  type __sync_fetch_and_xor (type *ptr, type value);
  type __sync_fetch_and_nand (type *ptr, type value);

I am assuming that my architecture doesn't support them..I thought that probably because it is not INTEL but looking a the CPU info I discovered that I have Intel CPU.

  >less /proc/cpuinfo

  processor       : 0
  vendor_id       : GenuineIntel
  cpu family      : 6
  model           : 26
  model name      : Intel(R) Xeon(R) CPU           X5570  @ 2.93GHz
  stepping        : 5
  cpu MHz         : 1600.000



   >uname -a
   Linux xxxxxx 2.6.24.7-108.el5rt #1 SMP PREEMPT RT 
   Mon Mar 23 10:58:10 EDT 2009      x86_64 x86_64 x86_64 GNU/Linux

Do you know other ways or libraries that might implement atomic variables for my architecture or if am I doing something wrong( maybe some compilation flags that I hould check out )?

NOTE: I found stdatomic.h but is for C++ only unfortunately

Usage example:

int i =0;
i = _sync_fetch_and_add (&i,2);
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2  
Could you show how you use these functions? It looks like you are missing one underscore out of two in function name __sync_XXX. –  Nikolai N Fetissov Mar 22 '11 at 15:22
    
Well I feel a bit stupid 'cos now it compiles with no problem.You were right..I was missing the first underscore..:( –  Abruzzo Forte e Gentile Mar 22 '11 at 15:52
    
No problem, everyone can use a second pair of eyes once in a while :) –  Nikolai N Fetissov Mar 22 '11 at 16:25

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

This answer is going to become relevant in the year 201X. :-)

The upcoming C1X standard is to introduce atomics as a C language feature. See the draft C1X standard.

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1  
:) I even didn't know that also C was going versus its C1X versions. I personally focused last years only in C++ and C++0x that I even could believe C was going to progress as well. Thanks for the good updated. –  Abruzzo Forte e Gentile Mar 22 '11 at 16:50

Try the -march command line option, the atomic builtins are not available for all target architectures. See also

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+1 In particular consider using -march=native. If your version of gcc doesn't support this, this is a good indication that it is too old. AFAIR versions up to 4.2 or so are a bit difficult in that they just leave the symbol undefined when they are not implementing this stuff. –  Jens Gustedt Mar 22 '11 at 15:53

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