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Is there anyway of getting rounded corners on the outline of a div element, similar to border-radius?

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Well I have got a Div box with a 2px Gray Border with 20px border-radius, I was wandering if I can then have a 10px Outine around that Border that follows the Border rather than being square –  Marc Guerin Mar 22 '11 at 16:12
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This is a good question. An element with border: 5px red and outline: 5px blue and border-radius: 5px, the border is rounded, but the outline is square. –  Matthew Rudy Aug 20 '12 at 10:37
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So far we can only use it in Firefox: -moz-outline-radius –  Wojciech Bednarski May 13 '13 at 14:37
    
It should be part of CSS3... If I think about it - I hate W3C :D –  m93a May 27 '13 at 13:34
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6 Answers

Old question now, but this might be relevant for somebody with a similar issue. I had an input field with rounded border and wanted to change colour of focus outline. I couldn't tame the horrid square outline to the input control.

So instead, I used box-shadow. I actually preferred the smooth look of the shadow, but the shadow can be hardened to simulate a rounded outline:

/* Smooth outline with box-shadow: */
input[type=text]:focus {
    box-shadow: 0px 0px 3pt 2pt red;
}

/* Hard "outline" with box-shadow: */
input[type=text]:focus {
    box-shadow: 0px 0px 0px 2pt red;
}
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IMO, this is the answer you're looking for. I've done this method but don't overlook turning your outline to 0. –  John Morton Jul 23 '12 at 22:40
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This is exactly what I was looking for, and fits even better than an outline radius. –  Zenexer Jun 8 '13 at 16:15
    
well played sir, very good to know this –  JDandChips Jul 17 '13 at 10:01
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I usually accomplish this using the :after pseudo-element: http://jsfiddle.net/6QUhf/

of course it depends on usage, this method allows control over individual borders, rather than using the hard shadow method.

you could also set -1px offsets and use a background linear gradient (no border) for a different effect once again.

a{ background: #999 ; padding: 10px 20px ; border-radius: 5px ; text-decoration: none ; color: #fff ; position: relative ; border: 2px solid #000 ; }
a:after{ content: '' ; display: block ; position: absolute ; top: 0 ; bottom: 0 ; left: 0 ; right: 0 ; border-radius: 5px ; border: 2px solid #ccc ; }
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Great solution! –  JohnK Sep 19 '12 at 5:53
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Similar to Lea Hayes above, but here's how I did it:

div {
 background: #999;
 height: 100px;
 width: 200px;
 border: #999 solid 1px;
 border-radius:10px;
 margin: 15px;
 box-shadow: 0px 0px 0px 1px #fff inset;
}

No nesting of DIVs or jQuery necessary, Altho for brevity I have left out the -moz and -webkit variants of some of the CSS. You can see the result at http://jsfiddle.net/Zq8XU/

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He's talking about the OUTLINE, not the border... "outline" radius –  android.nick Mar 2 '12 at 12:40
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correct, but since outline-radius is not available, my method gives the appearance of a border as well as an outline. This is a visual effect, so unless Marc's design is specified-down-to-the-pixel, the the fact that it doesn't actually use the outline property makes no difference. And since it's a practical solution, I'd appreciate the vote back –  Heraldmonkey Mar 4 '12 at 7:28
    
Thank you very much, a neat solution, you have my upvote! –  Gastón Sánchez May 28 '13 at 18:29
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This worked great. I didn't use inset, though, and got what I wanted. –  Paul Schreiber Aug 29 '13 at 19:09
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You're looking for something like this, I think.

div {
    -webkit-border-radius: 10px;
    -moz-border-radius: 10px;
    border-radius: 10px;
    border: 1px solid black;
    background-color: #CCC;
    height: 100px;
    width: 160px;
}

Edit

There is a Firefox-only -moz-outline-radius properly, but that won't work on IE/Chrome/Safari/Opera/etc. So, it looks like the most cross-browser-compatible way* to get a curved line around a border is to use a wrapper div:

HTML

<div class="outer"><div class="inner"></div></div>

CSS

div.inner {
    -webkit-border-radius: 10px;
    -moz-border-radius: 10px;
    border-radius: 10px;
    border: 1px solid black;
    background-color: #CCC;
    height: 100px;
    width: 160px;
}

div.outer {
    display: inline-block;
    -webkit-border-radius: 10px;
    -moz-border-radius: 10px;
    border-radius: 10px;
    border: 1px solid red;
}

Demo 2


*aside from using images

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No , I know how to get the Border Radius I was wandering if you could get an Outline-Radius –  Marc Guerin Mar 22 '11 at 16:08
    
Meaning what, exactly? A thicker outline, like this? jsfiddle.net/mattball/NXZFv/1 –  Matt Ball Mar 22 '11 at 16:09
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@Matt: a curved outline instead of a border, obviously. See w3.org/TR/CSS21/ui.html#dynamic-outlines –  Јοеу Mar 22 '11 at 16:10
    
Well I have got a Div box with a 2px Gray Border with 20px border-radius, I was wandering if I can then have a 10px Outine around that Border that follows the Border rather than being square. –  Marc Guerin Mar 22 '11 at 16:11
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Just one addition to your code matt, if you drop the border radius a few px on the inner box the corner then becomes much tighter, thanks for your help –  Marc Guerin Mar 22 '11 at 16:36
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I know what he means...

If you want to get an embossed look you could do something like the following:

http://jsfiddle.net/xxCT8/

he is looking for a way to have this work in other browsers.. no work-around that I have found but does anyone else have anything?

EDIT: The only other way you can do this is to use box-shadow, but then this wont work if you already have a box shadow on that element.

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You can use multiple shadows on the same element, separating them by commas. –  ArifHussain Apr 8 at 19:49
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No. Borders set on the outside of the element and on the inside of the box-model margin area. Outlines sit on the inside of the element and the box-model padding area ignores it. It isn't intended for aesthetics. It's just to show the designer the outlines of the elements. In the early stages of developing an html document for example, a developer might need to quickly discern if they have put all of the skeletal divs in the correct place. Later on they may need to check if various buttons and forms are the correct number of pixels apart from each other.

Borders are aesthetic in nature. Unlike outlines they are actually apart of the box-model, which means they do not overlap text set to margin: 0; and each side of the border can be styled individually.

If you're trying to apply a corner radius to outline I assume you are using it the way most people use border. So if you don't mind me asking, what property of outline makes it desirable over border?

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