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If I have an inner class that extends BroadcastReceiver within my Service class, should I care about synchronization, when the BroadcastReceiver class reads/writes to objects from the Service class? Or to put it in another way: Are BoradacstReceivers onReceive() Methods started in an extra thread?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 14 down vote accepted

The onReceive() method is always called on the main thread (which is also referred to as "UI thread"), unless you requested it to be scheduled on a different thread using the registerReceiver() variant:

Context.registerReceiver(BroadcastReceiver receiver, IntentFilter filter, String broadcastPermission, Handler scheduler)
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The onReceive() method is called on the main thread. So, in case all your access to the service class is done from within the main thread, you don't need any synchronization.

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4  
So the answer to his question is no! The onReceive method does not run on an extra thread. –  Joseph Earl Mar 22 '11 at 20:14
    
Android Cookbook: Be aware that the BroadcastReceiver runs on the same thread that the intent is Broadcast on; in our example this is the main/GUI thread! –  JohnyTex Oct 2 at 9:05

Are Android's BroadcastReceivers started in a new thread?

Usually, it all depends how you register it.

If you register your BroadcastReceiver using:

registerReceiver(BroadcastReceiver receiver, IntentFilter filter)

It will run in the main activity thread(aka UI thread).

If you register your BroadcastReceiver using a valid Handler running on a different thread:

registerReceiver (BroadcastReceiver receiver, IntentFilter filter, String broadcastPermission, Handler scheduler)

It will run in the context of your Handler

For example:

HandlerThread handlerThread = new HandlerThread("ht");
handlerThread.start();
Looper looper = handlerThread.getLooper();
Handler handler = new Handler(looper);
context.registerReceiver(receiver, filter, null, handler); // Will not run on main thread

Details here & here.

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Also, you can specify the "android:process" receiver element attribute in the AndroidManifest.xml. See here. That way you can specify that the receiver runs as a separate process and isn't tied to the main UI thread.

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