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I'm not sure how to explain this but this piece of code bellow can compile perfectly but when you run it, SIGSEV. Please, can anyone tell precisely where I got things wrong? The fact is I want to be able to access elements by index as below and at the same time to be able to work with struct.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

/* This is a struct describing properties of an element */
struct element{
    int age;
    char* name;
};

/* This struct contains a pointer to a pointer on a element "struct element" */
struct person{
    struct element** p;
    int id;
};

/* Thus function initializes a struct person by allocation memory for it */
struct person* init(int size)
{
    struct person* sample = (struct person* )malloc(size*sizeof(struct person));
    sample->p = NULL;
    sample->id = 0;
    return sample;
}

/* use this function to insert a new element in the struct */
void insert(struct person* sample, char* _name, int _age)
{
    sample->p[sample->id]->name = _name; /* the program crashes here  according to the debugger , but why?? */
    sample->p[sample->id]->age = _age;  /* of course, this will cause trouble too because it has the same construct as the previous one */
    sample->id++;
}


/* main entry */
int main()
{
    struct person* student = init(10); /* Allocating space for 10 students */
    insert(student, "kido", 8);
    printf("Your name is %s and your age is %d", student->p[0]->name, student->p[0]->age); /* we can't write student->p->name */
    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
    
"can anyone tell precisely" Debugger can. –  Cat Plus Plus Mar 22 '11 at 17:32
    
@Piotr: See comments in the code: "the program craches here according to the debugger , but why??" Also, +1 for including complete code. –  nmichaels Mar 22 '11 at 17:36
    
@nmichaels: Ah, I'm blind then. Sorry. –  Cat Plus Plus Mar 22 '11 at 17:41

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The problem is in the insert method at the line of code you flagged in the question

sample->p[sample->id]->name = _name;

Nowhere in your program do you allocate memory for the p array inside of the person struct. Hence this value will always be NULL. Attempting to assign to this value will rightfully lead to a crash of your program.

To fix this you need to ensure the p array is large enough to accommodate the index provided by the expression sample->id. Best way to accomplish this is to use the realloc function and add a field to person to store the size of the p array

Here's a quick sample. Note: Error checking and 0 initialization of memory omitted for bevity.

struct person{
    struct element** p;
    size_t length;
    int id;
};

void insert(struct person* sample, char* _name, int _age)
{
  if (sample->id >= sample->length) {
    sample->p = realloc(sample->p, sizeof(element*) * sample->id);
  }
  ...
}

It does seem odd though that the name and age are always indexed via the sample->id field. This indicates that it's always placed in the same location in which case an array is not needed. Can you elaborate on how this is supposed to function?

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! That was a stupid error i made there. –  Khan2011 Mar 22 '11 at 17:49
    
Sorry, I'm not sure I get your question but since element is a struct, even if accessing its members works like an array, age and name will just be at a contiguous addresses. in my case, I have: So accessing those members of element will just work like a normal struct. And because we have dynamic memory allocation, the whole thing will behave like a dynamic array. In case I got your question wrong, Please enlighten me. Regards –  Khan2011 Mar 22 '11 at 19:04
    
!continued! In my case I have: age @0x67a1e0 name @0x67a1e4 –  Khan2011 Mar 22 '11 at 19:11

In your init() function you set sample->p = NULL. In your insert() function you try to dereference the ->p member sample->p[sample->id]->name . Since you've not pointed ->p to any storage, you can't dereference it.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks guys!!! It's working now! –  Khan2011 Mar 22 '11 at 17:51
Starting program: /home/nathan/c/seg 

Program received signal SIGSEGV, Segmentation fault.
0x0000000000400597 in insert (sample=0x601010, _name=0x400730 "kido", _age=8)
    at seg.c:28
28          sample->p[sample->id]->name = _name; /* the program craches here  according to the debugger , but why?? */
(gdb) backtrace
#0  0x0000000000400597 in insert (sample=0x601010, _name=0x400730 "kido", 
    _age=8) at seg.c:28
#1  0x0000000000400601 in main () at seg.c:38
(gdb) p sample->id
$1 = 0
(gdb) p sample->p
$2 = (struct element **) 0x0

sample->p is not being properly initialized. If you look in init, it is indeed initialized to NULL. sample->p[anything] therefore dereferences a null pointer, causing a segfault.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 cute debugging. This was useful!!! Thanks –  Khan2011 Mar 22 '11 at 18:05

When you call your init() function, you allocate memory for a number of person structures, and set the 'p' pointer of the first structure to NULL.

Then you try to write the memory pointed by 'p'. Which is, of course, still NULL.

Given your comments, I don't think init() is doing what you want it to do. It's allocating space for a person structure array, rather than a person with a 'p' array. Also, why the double pointer?

Recheck your design :) I usually do it in a whiteboard, or pencil and paper, using boxes for my 'objects' and arrows for my pointers. It will clarify your ideas, and possibly show you mistakes before they ever reach the code.

share|improve this answer
struct person* init(int size)
{
    struct person* sample = (struct person* )malloc(size*sizeof(struct person));
    sample->p = NULL; // p is a pointer to a pointer which is initialized to NULL
                      // So, it cannot be dereferenced with out pointing to a valid
                      // memory location.

    // sample -> p = (struct person**) malloc( sizeof(struct *person) );
    // sample[p] = (struct(person*)) malloc( sizeof(struct person) );

    // struct** -> struct* -> struct

    sample->id = 0;
    return sample;
}

And now, these two statements are valid -

sample->p[sample->id]->name = _name;
sample->p[sample->id]->age = _age;
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, it is quite the same thing with JaredPar: i was trying to access elements on struct pointer whose value is NULL. –  Khan2011 Mar 22 '11 at 17:50

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