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Good morning, afternoon or night,

When implementing a given class as an immutable one, with no methods or properties exposing private/internal fields in any way, is shallow copying a bad practice or can it be done with no problems since it may require a lot less objects to be instantiated?

Thank you very much.

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4 Answers

Generally speaking (and there may be some exceptions to this), if your type is completely immutable it is rarely necessary to copy it at all, shallow or deep. You can just pass around the original instance.

One of the great advantages of properly immutable types is that I can pass around the same instance to all consumers, safe in the knowledge that none of them can alter it and corrupt it for another consumer.

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The reason you need to make a shallow copy is to change it. Since it's immutable, the only way to change it is to make a copy. Fortunately, that copy can always be shallow. –  Gabe Mar 22 '11 at 17:42
3  
@Gabe: You cannot change the copy, it's immutable :-) –  Vlad Mar 22 '11 at 17:44
1  
If you are going to change it, you would generally be creating a new instance, not copying it. It may be that you copy some of the references to existing children on the new instance (in which case a shallow copy of these items is fine), but if the class is truly immutable, you cannot "copy it to change it" per se. –  Rob Levine Mar 22 '11 at 17:46
    
In order to change a property of an immutable data structure, you have to do a shallow copy all of its properties to the new object and then set the one changed property on the copy. –  Gabe Mar 22 '11 at 18:17
    
I added an example to my answer (stackoverflow.com/questions/5395501/…) to see where you do a shallow copy to modify an immutable class. –  Gabe Mar 22 '11 at 19:10
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One of the advantages of using immutable data structures is that you can be much more efficient by only doing shallow copies when you need to change something. Obviously, you don't need to make any copy at all if you're not changing anything.

For example, you could have an immutable class like this:

class Data
{
    ...

    Datum x;
    public Datum X { get { return x; } }
    public Data WithX(Datum x)
    {
        var newData = (Data)this.MemberwiseClone(); // <-- Shallow copy!
        newData.x = x;
        return newData;
    }
}
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I do see what you mean with this pattern, although strictly speaking your type isn't immutable, because it can be mutated by another instance of itself. To be immutable in the strictest sense of the word, "Datum x" would be declared as readonly (as would all the private fields, and all their private fields). Your pattern would not work in this situation as you wouldn't be able to assign newData.x. In this scenario it is common to have a Type/BuilderType approach to creating instances based on other instances. System.Uri and System.UriBuilder are examples that spring to mind. –  Rob Levine Mar 22 '11 at 21:03
    
Rob: Strictly speaking, then, no type is immutable. You can always use reflection or access an instance through a pointer (or ref for value types) to mutate it. Being immutable means that there's no interface to change the bits, not that the bits are in ROM. –  Gabe Mar 22 '11 at 21:32
    
I was just pointing out that the term "immutable type" is generally taken to mean "write-once" immutability for C# devs IMHO. If, after object creation, you can mutate the type via properties or methods, then you don't have the compiler enforced safety of knowing it can't be changed. You do with readonly fields (once you understand the issues around collecitons/arrays of course). And yes - you can circumvent many compiler guarantees with reflection. Your pattern is still a good one, and very useful, but isn't immutable in the C# "readonly" sense. That was the only point I was trying to make –  Rob Levine Mar 23 '11 at 9:38
    
I ran this debate past a couple of my colleagues this morning. There view was that my argument is far more about whether I've enlisted the compiler to help guarantee the immutability of my types, to protect my from myself as a developer, than whether the type is immutable for all practical purposes. It might be good practice to use readonly (plus it helps the CLR optimize things), but the guarantee that the type cannot be mutated after construction is not necessary provided, like yours, you don't pass a reference out to consumers if there is a chance it can still change. So I'll shut up :) –  Rob Levine Mar 23 '11 at 9:56
    
Incidentally, one pattern which can work well is to use a POD structure to hold data (no code except maybe a constructor--just exposed fields), and have a data-storage class which accepts such a POD in its constructor and copies it to an immutable field. Such an approach combines the ability to piecewise-tweak the data for a new object while retaining true immutability for the data storage class. –  supercat Jul 31 '12 at 22:25
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It depends on the semantics of immutability you want to support - if you use a shallow copy you have to be guaranteed that the objects that you are sharing are not changing either, otherwise this would be perceived as a change from an observer. Besides this, sharing objects can actually be very beneficial in terms of performance, i.e. you need those objects only once as opposed to N times (also see Flyweight pattern).

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Assuming you mean that the objects copied (the "first level" in the graph) are immutable, then doing a shallow copy is good practice.

Also, immutable objects can have clone methods returning themselves, so if an object containing them is "deep copied" it will really be such a shallow copy. System.String for example, implements ICloneable with:

public object Clone()
{
  return this;
}

Personally, I'd recommend the following variant that reduces the need for casting when not called through the interface:

public class MyImmutableClass : ICloneable
{
  public MyImmutableClass Clone()
  {
    return this;
  }
  ICloneable.Clone()
  {
    return this;
  }
}
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